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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, June 09, 1904, Image 2

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JAPAN M)NDI
PROUD OF THE LOSS OF A SON
OR HUSBAND IN THE SERVICE
OF THE MIKADO.
ARE NOW- EAGER TO
SERVE AS NURSES.
No nation has a better right to be
proud of tvliat its tvomen have done j
?-W; in war time than Japan. Even the !
k-. .... mothers and wives of ancient Sparta;
have been rivaled in deeds of patriot- I
ism and self-sacrifice by the women
!%; of Japan, says the Mew York Sun,
-'r In the feudal times, which came to
an end in Japan only 30 years ago, .
'^11. gentlewomen were trained in the;
~ " nse of the sword and lance. The '
fe-, women of the samurai class received !
a re gular( military education and if '
B the castle of a daimio was besieged J
they Were Capable of assisting in the ,
defense if necessary.
- A . noted instance of the martial ;
|j. prowess of the Japanese women oc- i
curred during the siege of the castle j
ft of AVakamatstt in 1SC9, where the I
JtlV Shogun made his final stand against i
tiie forces of the Mikado. Nearly one j
0 . thousand women and girls belonging]
to the families of samurai attached ;
iKtH.- to. the Shogun fought behind the bar- ;
fe&'t'''ricades and on the castle walls. Many |
jK- of' them were killed in battle, while ]
$_ . not a few of them committed suicide j
fi-iw'i; rather than undergo the humiliation ;
Iff" of defeat.
1111^ Yet the Amazonian, qualities of the j
^ ' women of old Japan did not detract
teA-A from their Womanliness. They were
jriL tender mothers and loving wives. The
llllgjr,. nursing of' the wounded and sick was j
part of the education of every samurai
Bgji., With the passing away of the age
I* ol chivalry in Japan, upon the downj?:'
fall of the ..Shogunate, the Japanese
- woman was called upon to face new
iff . . conditions, and now she met these
conditions is shown in the history of
the Chinese war in 1S95.
' It is a matter of record . that some
.10,000 Japanese women volunteered to
So to the front as nurses in she field j
hospitals at the outbreak of the
Chinese war, and advices from Japan
state that the number of women volIjPlsf
unteering to go to the front as nurses
p to-day is greater than in 1S95. But
the women who stay at home are not
lacking in patriotic, devotion.
' There is an anecdote concering the
mother of the heroic Commander
IP Sakamoto, who was killed on the
ife ' bridge of his ship, the Akagi. at the
battle of Yalu, which shows how the
|P spirit of patriotism flames in the
f : hearts of Japanese women.
X An official of the navy department
called on the family of the naval
(officer to convey, as delicately as possible,
the news of his death. Having
communicated his tidings to a memI
'. ber of the family, he was about to
|| depart, when the shoji slid open
? ' softly and the aged mother of the
fcg dead commander staggered into the
i" room.
f% - She had been an accidental eaves- :
V dropper and had heard all. Trembling :
x with emotion she bowed to the vis?&
' > iting officer and said:
fe. "Tell the emperor I rejoice that a
I son of mine has been able to be of
X some service to him."
? aome Japanese women ieiu?eu iu
jT 1 weep over their dead, because it was
pi . considered disloyal to the Mikado to
weep for those who had the honor to
die fighting for him. When a wife
|;iv or a mother heard that a husband or
jp .a 'son had been killed in battle, the
Et'r first expressioning uttered was an
tej... acknowledgement of the honor con|f;.i
ferred upon her by the gods in being
?p:.' bereaved for the cause of the empeKh
- ror.
Ifcc' To the Western mind such patriotpoi-",
ism appears to he fantastic and hard
. to understand. In the light of JapStv
'anese history it does not seem so
&- - strange.
|j'The spirit of patriotism in the Japanese
women of the present gcneraj?.
tion is the outgrowth of ages of feu?.rV'
.. dalism. The loyalty and devotion
which the women of past generations
gave to their feudal family head are
j; in the present generation given to the
few Mikado.*
Sps In time of war the Empress of Ja:
pan sets an example for all the wog
men of the country by her activity in
behalf of all those who are suffering
or in distress. She may he seen fre_
quently visiting the great military
. hospitals, accompanied by a party of
fit; court women and noblemen's wives.
|te Following the example of the Empress,
all the great women of Toltio
society do what they can to relieve
i&v;.; ? xn? uisuuss auu humiiu?
Ks& . tably foilotvs -war. There is no class
"!. of women that does not contribute
gi#jtometiing to this cause; even those
" v:erfiies, the geishas, and the un y'
creatures in''the Voshiwares
- f, ' C
;:e.T share.
only the women of the
who show passionate
esented in the
9g|fe. s Proof
3MEN
SRFUL IN WAR
that she is cjuite as devoted to the
Mikado as the sumarai woman.
A story is tcid of an old peasant
woman who sent her only son to fight
for the Emperor in the Chinese war.
By depriving herself of everything
but the' barest necessaries of life,!
and toiling early and late in the
fields, she had been able to give her
son a superior education, and she had
the satisfaction of seeing him fairly
started on a business career, which
promised to he successful, when the.
call to arms sounded.
The little peasant mother made her
son give tip his business and enter the
ranks oi' the army. The boy did as
his mother wished/and his regiment
was one of the first to set loot on
Chinese soil.
Every morning just before daybreak
the little peasant woman rose and.
after making a careful toilet, as an
orthodox Buddhist, she went to a little
shrine nearby and prayed to Ojin,
the god of war. She did not pray
for her son to come home safe and
sound, but she prayed that he might
prove worthy of the honor of wearing
the Mikado's uniform.
One day, when the old woman was
returning to her home from the temple,
she met a messenger who told
her that her son had keen killed in
the attack on Port Arthur. The
mother's eyes grew dim with tears,
and she swayed unsteadily for a moment.
Then she turned and started
to go back to the temple.
"Where are you going?" cried the
i messenger. "Don't you understand
what I say? Your son has been kill|
od."
"Yes. i understand," said the old j
I woman, calmly, "and I am going to i
| thank Ojin for the honor he has con-j
j ferred upon me."
I The Japanese woman who above
j till others distinguished herself in war i
I time was the Empress Jingu Kogo, j
who led a Japanese army in person
! to Korea in 20 J A. D. and conquered
i that .country. She was equally re|
nowned for her beauty, her piety, her
; energy and her martial valor.
She assumed the supreme power
on the death of her husband, the Mikado
Cliiunai, in 200 A. D.. and immediately
demonstrated her military
I genius by suppressing a formidable
rebellion. A Jew years later she invaded
Korea and quickly subjugated
that country.
She dressed in male attire and
fought at the head of her soldiers.
After her return from Korea she
gave birrli to a son, who became the
Mikado Ojin and like his mother a
great warrior. Jingo Kogo is worshiped
as the goddess of war in Japan
to-day, and her son Oji as the god
of war.
The history of the feudal warfare
in Japan is replete with instances of
the heroism of the women. It often
happened that the wife of a daimio
was called upon to defend the castle
from attack during the absence of
| her husband. She was well quali?
1 fieil for the task both by training and
experience.
Considering what Japan has been in
the past, it does not seem strange ;
that the Japanese women of to-day
shouhl possess a keen martial spirit
and intense -patriotism.
C
Urn
? * ' ? -% ? ? -* * *
j * ? I * * *?,** * *
| * *
14. COSTUMED MAUD MULLERS 4.
* ?
: * *
: ?-? In Pink, White, Veiiow, Blue
j And Red On fvlorrow Lawn ?? i
; Thursday Evening, ?
I ?- June the 9th. ??
1 ?
6 *
4- Save your eyes to look upon 4.
4. the bevy of pretty Maud Mullers 4.
4* Fast oue meal so you may 4*
4- heartily partake of ice cream, 4"
4. and rich, juicy strawberries 4*
4* fresh from Baltimore. And? 4"
4* and?did you say what else? 4*
4. Cake of course?such as the 4*
4. Presbyterian women make. 4*
4. Yes?ail l'or 25c?with your 4.
4. ears all the while poured brim 4*
4. full of the sweetest of sweet 4.
4. music. The Greater Fairmont 4*
4. Band. 4*
*
NOTICE
I will sell all street hats and flowers
I now have on hands regardless of
cost this week. Come and get hats
and flowers almost at your own price.
.Mrs. Laura Frazer,
423 Jackson St. X
Hot plates, oil stoves, ice cream
freezers, garden hose, lawn sprinklers,
water coolers, screen doors and windows,
are some of the summer necessities
to be found at J. L. Hall's
Hardware Store. x
; '
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
~~ ~ ICIWYERS ~
JAS. A. MEREDITH,
Attorney at. Iyaw,
FAIRMONT, JVV. Va.
Office, B. A. Fleming Building.
JOHN L. LEHMAN,
Latvyer,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
A. O. STANLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, T. \V. Fleming Building.
W. 3. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, \V. Ya.
Office, "Hall Block.
A. L, LEHMAN,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, \V. Va.
Office, Hull Block.
C. hi. LEEDS,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, \Y. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
HARRY SHAW,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, \V. Ya.
Olllce. Haymonil bl'tlg., Jefferson St
E. M. SHOV/ALTER,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT. \V. Va.
Oflice in \V. A. Fleming Building.
T. N. PARKS,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, \Y. Ya.
Office Main St., Opposite Court-house
A. S, FLEMING,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT. \Y. Ya.
Office. 202 Main Street.
. E. F. HARTLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT. \V. Ya.
Office, First National Bank Building
PHYSICIANS.
C. O. HENRY, M. D?
Physician and Surgeon,
FAIRMONT. W. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hall Block.
H. R. JOHNSON. M. D.,
Practice Hi mi ted to the Eye, Ear, Nos
and Throat.
FAIRMONT, V. Va.
Office, Second Floor. Hall Bloclc.
DR. L. B. BURK,
Treatment. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throal
OFFICE, 304 MAIN STREET.
Hours?*12 to 3 P. M., 7 to 9 P. M.
Otherwise by Appointment.
JOHN R. COOK. M. D-,
FAIRMONT. W. Va.
OiFice at Hospital.
DR. D. L. L. YOST.
Office 225 Jefferson Street.
Residence, new building. Fairmont avt
DR. V. A. SELBY,
FAIRMONT, TV. Va.
Office in Cunningham Block.
W. C. <2. JESSE A. JAMISON.
Physicians and Surgeons,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office 30C Main Street.
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL,
F. W. Hill, M. D.?Corner of Quinc
and Jackson street. Office Hours
10 A. M. to 12 M., T to 9 P. M.
DR. EUGENE W. LOMAX,
312 Main St.. Fairmont, TV. Va.
HOURS?S to It A. M.; 2 to 5 P. M.
G to 9 P. M. Consolidated 'Phone 331
LUC! AN N. YOST, M. D.,
Electric .Physician and Surgeon.
City Office Over Manshach's Store.
Honrs?10 to 12 A. II., 2 to 4 P. M
G to S P. M. Res. hours?7 to 9 /
M? 12 to 2 P. ,M? 5 to G P. M.
dentistsTDr.
A. R. BADGLEY,
DENTIST: Vitalized Air Given fo
Extraction if Desired. Prices Ret
sonable. All Work Guaranteed.
Dr. J. O. McNEELY,
DENTIST.
Main Street.
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
DR. W. J. BOYDSTON,
Dental Surgeon.
Office, 107 Main street. Opposit
Postoffice.
L. G. ICE, ?
DENTIST.
Porcelain Work a Specialty.
Yost Building.
OPTICIANS.
A. O. & H. H. HEDGES,
I Jewelers and Opticians,
J2i water street.
Expert Watch and Optica! Work.
Over 20 years" experience.
YETERIXART AX SURGEOX.
DR. JAMES E, MAGEE,
Veterinarian Surgeon and Dentist.
Oflice at Chilson & Claytor's LiverStable.
Bell "^hoiie 1C4 R.
1? it's an ideal xvedding gift you an
looking for, Cochran, the reliabh
jewe.er, has it specially selected fo;
the occasion. >
You will, find a complete line o
base ball goods and bicycle repair;
at J. L. Hall's Hardware Store. t
.. . - '...jdlii
PALMIST
AND I
clairvoyant;
THE ORIGINAL AND CELEBRATED ,
EUROPEAN PSYCHIC ADEPT
AND LIFE READER,
VICTOR CO RING A, M. P. S,
AUTHOR, SCHOLAR^ LECTURER 1
AND GIFTED OCCULT
WORKER.
PRESIDENT OF THE COLUMBUS
INSTITUTE OF PSYCHOLOGY,
NEW YORK CITY.
Author cf "The Christ Power of Yesterday
and the New Psychology of
To-Day," "Soul Forces and Mental
Powers," Etc.
He is famous throughout Europe and
America for his many marvelous revelations
and inspired lectures, which
have astonished the foremost scientists
and deepest thinkers of the age. 1-Ie
remains in your city to see the fulfillment
of his predictions, and offfers a
cash guarantee for each and every as:.
sertion he makes. Fifteen years of un~
paralleled success in his gifted profession.
Where will you be this time next
year? What changes will take place in
your life in that time? What happiness
and sorrow will you experience?
What will the year bring forth?
If your past has been sorrowful make
;. sure that your future will be happy.
- Success, truth, harmony. love, wealth
and health can he gained by one consultation.
Life holds for every man
and woman health, wealth and success
in all undertakings if vou know how,
when and where to obtain it, which
- will be told you. Wonderful powers
to control people at a distance, in fore
eign lands or near by \t with powers of
mind to travel in spirit, to read the
minds of others, or change their disposition.
By this power a strong and
lasting love for yourself can be createtl
in the heart of the one of your
choice, or the influence of another person
over the one you love can be readily
broken off. It is that power by
- which cue person can control the
minds of others, cause persons to love
and respect them, make friends and rer
tain their friendship. It is the secret
of success in all undertakings. Valuable
information, advice and instruction
given on all matters of importance,
such as business, investments,
wills, property, estates in foreign countries.
law suits, marriage, domestic
_ troubles, divorce, promotion or advancement
in occupation or business,
collection of money, payment of debts,
etc. Absent friends, lost or stolen articles
located and returned. Buried
treasures, valuable minerals, oils, gas,
etc., located by maps and charts re.
coived in psychic trance state. Marriage
with the one of your choice
brought about speedily by strong silent
forces. Drunkenness, morphine
and other had habits cured without
: medicine or the person's knowledge of
!. same. Everything private, secret and
confidential. You do not come in contact
with other callers.
if you come to him honest and fairminded,
he will, before you speak a
single v/ord,
" : TELL YOU YOUR NAME,
I where you were born, what you called ;
for, who is true or false, when and
whom j'ott will marry, how to gain
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val or enemies, how to influence and
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give other evidences of his wonderful
powers, taking no fee in advance,
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Could anything he fairer?
NOT LIKE OTHERS.
CORINGA is the only exponent of
e Thebitian Lama knowledge in America.
Please do not associate him in
_ your mind with others of a similar
profession for he has no equal in America,
which is sufficiently demonstrated
by the fact that he has a standing offer
of 51,000, which he will give to any
medium or clairvoyant in this country,
who can give the reading he does.
- Is patronized by kings, princes and" the.
aristocracy of all nations that he visits.
His parlors are visited by ladies
and gentlemen of the highest walks in
life, anxious for reliable information
as to the outcome of future or past
: moves.
"The experiments of Victor Coringa
have attracted the attention of those,
interested in psychical phenomena and
the most advanced scientific men of
the capital.?Washington,D.C.Times,
_ May 11, 1902.
e Full reading with complete advice
a and instructions for one-fifth regular
r price first seven days only. Come now
? and take advantage of low rates.
Hours 19 A. M. to S P. M.
; Parlors, Hotel Kenyan.
S The WARft
%
? \A/oe&s~ir
<$. If you. wi
? store we <
in showi
y3 which, wi
fortable t
| HOI
Serge, Crash
@ weight StraA
ford Shoes, e
I H/W/E
t
X Rand
5 31
? HE/\D TO Fr<
Ji
READ THIS
If you are a
not, we want you.
THE DAILY
is new, and lias its
about tliat. You
But we are workhij
second to none in t'
IT TAKES MON
to establish an up-1
not know about tin
for it. We knew it
felt that some int
needed such a pa*
WE ARE "BOOST!
We believe Eg
hold of her great'
promote her best
various institution!
We need, all tlie en1
courage tlie men w
tliis community wi]
try to give
ALL
and occasionally te
TENSGENTS
forty cents is tlie p:
dollars pays for it a
"Come tliou w
good.
First Floor Ne
Street and Porter A
I weather suggests #
r
DOL i |i
?' WW
ajojdeii-^i. s )] /
II come into our
shall take pleasure jl I I
mg you 'the kind M !
11 make you com? ? ! j '
^ese "
' . DAYS. J /
and Linen Suits, Light ? f
Hats, Canvas Ox- gt'
tc., etc. ^
/\ LOOK !!! | [
-K -* M -fc * *
lal! & Co.5 f I
17 ftfiairi St. ;
DOT OUTFITTERS. ? ??
i COPY OF THE
st>! Virginian I
H
subscriber, that's nice; if - | I
WEST VIRGINIAN '
SB
shortcomings. You kno\3 9
were new once yourself 1" ffi
g hard to make our papesr [ p
Liis region. ' S
EY AND HARD WORK jj
bo-date paper. If you ?io H
it, you can take our word j 11
; before we started, but we i
erests in tliis community \.fl
>er as we propose to rim. '
EES," NOT "KNOCKERS." j 1
lirrnont to be at tbe thres- fl
est era of prosperity. Tex I
interests and npbold ter j
3 will be our daily concern. j fl
;erprises we have. To en- j
ho are helping to build up \ fl
I be our delight. We will j fl
THE NEWS, |
II you what we think about things I
jflfMB
xys the Daily one weelc, fl
cice per raontii; wmie tornr i nn
, wliole year. I
itla us and we will do tliee M
; - : /. ' ' ' '':
w Jacobs Building, Monroe ' H

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