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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, June 16, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092557/1904-06-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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DEATH LISJ M
RKACIl I)
:.r. ' . " *
"THE GENERAL SLOCUM HORROR
GREW DURING THE NIGHT.
!T IS SIMPLY AWFUL.
SOME VERY SERIOUS CHARGES
ARE MADE BY SURVIVORS
AGAINST MANAGEMENT
OF THE BOAT.
-cYioir irniA 1G.?Health J
JSi VV i ViVik, v, ..? _
' Commissioner Darlington, who had
.heen on North Brothers Island most
of the night," came down with a boat
"load of dead to the morgue this morning.
"I am satisfied that fully 1.000
" ."have lost their lives in this disaster,"
..said Commissioner Darlington. "This
--/estimate is being made after carefully
-going over the entire accident. There
were 1,500. persons on the boat. Only
200 of these were cared for at North
"Brothers Island hospital. The ruins
of the boat are still choked with
"bodies."
Superintendent Rickard, of Belle*.vne
Hospital, said this morning:
"It will take days and days to iden- tify
all the bodies. In all my IS
..years of hospital experience, this is
""? ?annallin? accident I ever
-?t.t itrz auwoi. ^
iheard of. I believe that 1,200 people
-are dead."
4. TCEW YORK. June 1C.?Up to 8:30
^o'clock this morning four hundred
and eighty bodies of victims of the
-disaster on the steamboat General
iSIoeum had been recovered. Eight
bodies, in one group were picked up
-<off bJdrth Brothers Island. The divers
~at dawn resumed work in the sunken
bail of the Slocum. They have by
their efforts added to the ghastly list.
The horror grew during the night.
'The total number of dead, it is now
^estimated will reach at least eight
t "hundred. Some estimates put it as
."high as 1,000.
Grief stricken crowds thronged the
morgues, the vicinity or St. iviai-K. s
'Chnrch and the shores near the wreck
-all night looking for loved ones. One
^<*tlier-'-who--iaietttifled -- "the Inrfhwr
body of her child at the morgue this
morning tried to jump from the piers
pn which the body Tay.
She was restrained with difficulty
' rand led away by friends.
The serious charge is made by survivors
that the steamboat was supplied
with rotten life preservers.
"The authorities are investigating the
charges.
About two hundred feet from the
\New York shore off the place known
as Hunt's Point, the uper part of a
paddle box, two smoke stacks, a
scorched flagstaff and some twisted
and bent iron work all sticking out of
the water at an angle of 45 degrees,
lie the remains of the ill-fated steamboat,
General Slocum. It is a temporary
and hideous monument of the
scene where nearly 1,000 persons, j
rv,,-, nr bulk of whom were women j
-and children, lost their lives in fire j
-and water. To-day there are grave
murmurirgs and charges that this
terrible sacrifice of life was needless
?that the officers of the boat, though
" their bravery is admitted, erred when
they drove the burning vessel for
halt' a mile before beaching her, that
-the life belts were rotten and unserviceable
and the construction of the
upper works of the boat was faulty,
inasmuch as they were all of wood
-and gave a free sweep to the flames.
This latter complaint is true of
steamboats all over the country.
There is no law providing that superstructures
should be built of steel,
"hut with the Slocum horrors as a
terrible loss, it will not be surprising
'if such a steamboat regulation were
, Long Island Sound was covered.
'this morning with a thick white mist
|it that settled around the wreck of the
Ck Slocum as if in an endeavor to cover
the horror spot with a huge white
I mantle. All through the night rela|
tives of the dead were looking for
| their loved ones. Half a dozen divers
I were at work this morning, led by
h John Rice, the hero of the Boonton
catastrophe, in which Diver Oleson
lost his life. Every now and then the
people on shore would see a man in
' a weird looking suit, slip over the
. side of a tug and sink to the bottom.
When he returned he would have a
~ Rmiro In his
' Otacjvfcjueu, uiii/yiui, ?
.-arms, a victim of the disaster.
. The Captain's Statement.
Half crazed after his terrible experience
Captain William Van
, "Schaick, of the ill-fated General Slo-trtim,
lies in Lebanoh Hospital a prisoner.
He was removed to the Hos
pita! from the Alexander Avenue po-'
AY
NE THOUSAND
lice station after he had collapsed r
In reply to the charges that he J
might have saved scores of lives, j
had he heaehed his vessel immediate- j
ly after the fire was discovered in- }
stead of running her up the river for :
neatly a mile to North Brothers j
Islam!. Captain Van scnaicn sa;u i?jday:
"I think there were about 1400 pas- j
sengers aboard when we left the
dock. I took the vessel up the river
slowly and was bearing over toward
Sunk Meadows when my blood turned j
cold at the sight of fire issuing from !
the companionways. I sounded the j
alarm for the fire drill and left the j
pilot house to direct the crew in fight- j
ing the flames. I was met by a terri- j
ble rush of panic-stricken people.
The situation was beyond the control
of any man. I stood powerless to
stop the panic among the passengers. !
The flames came up like lightning, j
I ran up by the pilot house and swung j
the boats towards North Brother !
Island.
Men, women and children were
jumping overboard. 3Iy God, what a
sight it was to me. I ran for the
sand spit of the Island, and continually
signalled the engine room to crowd
on every pound of steam. Followed
by my pilots I ran over to the rail
and leaped into the river.
I do not think more than five minutes
elapsed from the time the fire
was discovered to the time we ran j
the shin on the beach."
To-day the bravery exhibited by
Captain Van Schaiclt is admitted by
surt ivors. There are many who
think he erred in making the longer
run to North Brothers Island instead
of putting into the New York Shore,
but they give him credit for sticking
by his ship to the last. The Captain's
hat was burned from his head
and his clothing was on fire when he
leaped into the water. He- had also
accomplished what he started out to
do?to beach his boat?before he
d4ed_ho_save_himself ?J .
NEW YORK. June 1C.?3 P. M.?
During the last hour 12 additional
identifications have been made at the
morgue. Two tugs, the Massasoit
and the Fidelity have arrived there,
the first with 26 bodies on board and
the latter with seventy. This makes
577 bodies that have reached the
morgue.
CORBIN
RELIEVED
OF HIS COMMAND IN THE EAST j
?HE IS TO'HAVE CHARGE OF
THE DIVISION OF PHILIPPINES
AFTER OCT. 1.
WASHINGTON, June 1G.?An order
was issued at the War Department
to-day by direction of the President
relieving Major General Kenry
C. Corbin of the Command of the
Department of the East on October
1. and assigning him to the command
of the Division of the Philippines
Vice General James Wade. This announcement
came as quite a surprise,
it having been generally expected
that General WoocJ would succeed
Geneial Wade. It is believed that the
opposition in the Senate to the promotion
of General Wood is largely
responsible for the change of program.
It. is also runted that it is
the desire of General Chaffee to be
succeeded as the Chief of Staff by
General Corbin, and that the assignment
of the latter to the Philippines
is for the purpose of putting him in
line for that, poshion. General Chaffee
will retire in February, 1906, and
Corbin in September of the same
year.
Eagles Flying Homeward.
The members of the local Aerie of
Eagles are returning on every train.
The Greater Fairmont band accompanied
them, and returned last night.
The Eagles who have returned report
the time of their lives. Mounds
ville Aerie took the pirze our dujs
ought to have captured. \
All Trimmed Hats Reduced at
The Bon Ton. x
If you are in need of a bicycle "we
carry a complete line from $20 to $40.
J. L. Hall's Hardware Store. x
/xotiiri
/ HIM, THtS f
/ BOUQUET ;
y I BECAUSE; VO
Grover Cleveland has indors
WT_ c&s c-fcs < ?- c-'l-i e&i c&? cle e$* ds!U 55
- > - ?. -> -* -j. o. -v a
I NORMAL S
J Many Intere
??= ?$, %> ^ =? *$, -?? ^ *$> ??_.
ALL OVER
THE LAST OF THE COMMENCEMENT
EXERCISES TOOK J
PLACE LAST NIGHT?THE
AI IIMNI BANQUET
WAS THE FINALE.
The Xormal Alumni held a business
meeting in the library yesterday
afternoon. Short speeches were
made by the members present, several
of whom were among the school's
first graduates. The Alumni meeting's
are always interesting, being
something like the old time experience
meetings. The officers for the
coming year were elected. They
are: President, Hon. Harvey W. Harmer:
Vice Presidents, Miss Alice
Ohley. Wade Robinson, Willa Hickman
and W. X. Engle; Secretary,
Miss Jane Etta McKinney; Corresponding
Secretary, Miss Willa j
Butcher, and Treasurer, Miss Olive
Men ear.
Alumni Banquet.
Last evening the members of the j
Alumni met at the Normal Audito- i
rium and held a memorial exercise j
in behalf of the members who have i
died within the past year. Eulogies |
were pronounced on W. S. Fleming I
by B. L. Butcher: on C. B. Hickman
by Herschel Rose, and on Mrs. Sallie
Gallahue Fleming by Stuart F. Reed,
after which the Alumni proceeded to
the Watson Hotel where a delectable
menu was served. About one hundred
were present and the time was
spent in pleasure.
Harvey W. Harmer. of Clarksburg,
was toastmaster and he performed
that task in a manner highly pleasing
to all present. A. J. Wilkinson responded
with "The Pleasant Side of
School Life." Mrs. J. 0. Watson
spoke of "Our Future" and "The Editor"
was the subject of Stuart F.
Reed. M. D. Boland read a paper,
prepared by Perry A. Sidells, of Dallas,
Texas. Short speeches were also
made by Miss Clara Reinheimer and
Herschel Rose , J. W. Robinson, Mrs.
-- ? --??- ? j v>~.- t w Clark
1V1. AL. INCCO auu.
were on the program, but were unable
to be present. J. Walter Barnes
and Principal McCowan each gave a
short address, after which the class
roll was called and the representatives
of the different classes stood
up. A. J. Wilkinson invited the
Alumni to attend, a banquet to be
given by him. at the time of commencement
.next-yearT Soon , after
; twelve o'clock the guests departed,
; v ' ?5;
; iKrlBN.
3 ;r\UTlH;L \
I r A.-RS- /
;ed Parker in very glowing terms for th
f- 'f< ajc ^ *T> ~f-?$? ?$? ? -i4
CHOQL COMM
:sting and Entertaining
T lr * -a <- < 1r ,tr kr <r Hr
pl-V T -T- *T= T gg ; ?1 *< 'i ~i
each feeling that the time liad been
well spent. This is the first time the
banquet has been given away from
the Normal.
The reunion and banquet last
evening closed the exercises of the
Normal for the present year.
Most of the students have gone to
-l- ~1 - homes and to-day the
LllCil ICOl/VVw.v
building has a deserted appearance.
Some of the faculty have already
left and others will go this evening.
It is not known whether the same faculty
will return next fall or not.
There may be many changes which
may be for better or for worse.
The Normal School is very near to
Fairmont citizens, and they are very
anxious for its continued success.
As the years go by. the school ought
to enlarge in its equipment and scope
of work. It ought to be a true Normal
with training teachers and every
appliance to make it rank with
the great schools of the country.
GUILTY
FRANKLIN S. EATON CONVICTED
OF HEINOUS CRIME.
PARKERSBURG, W. Va.. June 1G.?
Prank S. Eaton, of Baltimore, is
guilty of attempting to commit a
criminal assault on a mere child.
After deliberating for four hours
the criminal court Jury returned a
verdict of guilty yesterday afternoon.
When the verdict of guilty was being
read the prisoner underwent a partial
physical collapse and almost fell
upon the floor but soon again regained
his composure. His attorney at once
made a motion for a new trial and
the motion Is now under consideration
by the court.
Eaton was arrested in March on
South Side charged with attempting
to assault Leona, the eleven year old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W._ C. Morehead,
of South Side, and a short time
before he was arrested he was seen
with the child in a stone quarry by
?on,t ntthnnsrh the child
LWU |iCl suuo, lwv.
was in a serious physical condition
tor several days afterwards and
could not be taken to the court of the
magistrate for the preliminary, gave
a description of the man. and it tallied
with that o?. Eaton. He was 'seen
leading the child, by the hand by several.
persons some time before . he
made an attempt" to criminally assault
, F
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4* 4* 4s 4- 4* 4- 4- 4- 4* t 4* 4*?^ lv
n\TrCMC\!T ?;
Cnt'LiULII I T .
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' Exercises. J *
" *5* 'j
s. sj-.. _j\ ?$* ?j> -j; -? . -j. <$f? ?$> ?i- ji
BIG PURSE 1
C
IS UP ON THE NEW YORK RACES ?
v.
TO TAKE PLACE THIS AFTER- t,
NOON?IRISH LAD IS A ii
FAVORITE. C
s;
NEW YORK, Juno If,.?The twen- ||
ty-first renewal of the suburban
handicap will be run this afternoon at
the Coney island Jockoy Clubs track
at Sheepshead Bay. The Suburban
is the blue ribbon event of American
racing and is worth S20.000 of which T
-1?* 1 * ftit trt the winner.
CilJUUL ^XU,VVV
Cornelius Fellows, Secretary of
the Coney Island Jockey Club expects
to have fifty thousand racing enthusiasts
at the track to see this great c<
race run, and lie has prepared ac- g>
commodations for that number. T
Seven of the horses in training, lc
the cream of the turf, have been hi
carded to start in this rich event, lc
and a fast pace from start to finish
is looked for. The starters will be al
Irish Cad who won the Metropolitan
handicap; Hermls the $00,000 horse; 01
the Picket who won the Brooklyn si
handicap; Proper, who finished third R
in the Brooklyn handicap; African- '
der. who won JSO.OOO in stakes last R
year; Major Dangerfield, who ranged <1
close to the champion as three year ei
old and Short Hose, who won many "i
rich prizes last year as a three year
old. In the anti-post betting, Irish e!
I.ad, is the favorite S to 5; The Picket e
second choice at 3 to 1; Hermis 4
to-1; Proper at 4 to 1; Major Danger- h
field at S to 1; Africander 2 to 1 and n
Short Hose 1 to 1. The other feature ci
of the double event for two years
olds at Ave and a half furlongs. Four
other well filled races were also on
the card. The weather is clear and t
the track fast. n
t
Miss Bessie and John RicTgely, of g
Cumberland, arrived in the city yest
err lav for a two weeks visit at the
home of their grandmother, Mrs. Wil- '
liam Ridgely, and their father, *
Lloyd Ridgely.
?
While John E. Smith, the popular .
landlord of the Marion, and a friend
were enjoying last evening I on the
river in Mr. Smith's launch, the boat .
caught Are and was badly damaged. .
They managed to get the- craft to
town, however. . ' ,
Mriw
SiSPOtiDS TO THE WEST VIRGIN- ?
lAN'S TELEGRAM BUT IT
CAME TOO LATE FOR J
YESTERDAY'S PAPER. 5
Ac stated yesterday, as soon as v/e |
ettived the dispatch referring to the
r.vitat'on of Mr. Dayton to enter the |
:resident's Cabinet, we at once sought
o verify it. Mrs. Dayton was called
- I stated test she was awared?|?^9^|
7 such a plan being under considers- I
'on. hut knew nothing of the state- '?
sent which had been given out. We
ten wired Mr. Dayton, and last even- Z
nr we received the following mesrgefrorn
him:
"PARSONS, W. Va., June 15. |
M. C. Lough, Fairmont West Vir- [
"Have not been invited to succeed
iccretary Moody. Have not discussed
natter with President. .
"ALSTON G. DAYTON." |
OntRAMPAGE i
iRstwarder with plenty op |
MONEY CROSSES THE RUBI- |
CON MUCH TO HIS DETRI- \__J
MENT.
It Is reported that a grocer of the
"irst ward, started out the other day
II a boozer. When pretty well tank- i
(I up. he caught .sight of the local
ollce whom he sought to evade; and
laplaying a quantity of silver In' one . .
and and a wad of bills In the othr.
defiantly remarked that he guessd
he had enough to carry him be- f
ond their jurisdiction, where lie
oiild quaff the desired beverage to t
he full, and so betook himself across
he river. The next heard from him - -|
as, that he entered the kind of I
lace he was hunting, ordered up I
rinks, hut refused to pay for them
xcept In badly coined language. f
.ater he called for a box of dice, re- civiug
which he at once made for
he door and out into the street in
n attempt to make off with them. j
"he wily bartender was on to his
ol., however, and following in close |
tirsuff, soon overhauled hfin and pro- t
ceded to play havoc with bis |
hyslogiiouiy- with remarkable rapidy.
When he returned with his "flz" ;|
hus bruised and sacrificed, he could f
learlv see with the. only eye left
*"?*? that If our liberty loving" cltf
ens of the First ward cannot ven- 1
J re- across the rubicon without be- vj
to tints maltreated, they must proure
heitor protection in advance or
offer the consequences. Sobriety is ;
re b?it security, while the way of : )
ic Iransgressor is hard. 1 ' - gljjMB
BIG LOSS 1
HE TOKIO CORRESPONDENT
SAYS A BIG BATTLE HAS
BEEN FOUGHT.
LONDON, June 10.?The Toklo
jrrespondent of the Iteutcr Teleram
Company says that in a light at |
elissa, near Fou Chow, the Russians
>st five hundred killed 'and three
undred taken prisoners. They also-:
pst 14 guns.
t Hot o
J lit:? iJUimucct; V.M.-J x
ST. PETERSBURG, June 16.?An
ffieial dispatch received to-day
atfs thai the fighting between the
ussians and Japanese at Vafangcw.. ,
iao Tung Peninsula continues. The -'?j|j
ussian' losses on June 11. says the
Ispatch. were two generals wound- . | : s
I, twenty officers and three hundred .
ica killc-d and wounded. On June tr
5 the Russians attached the Japan- - its
io. who returned the attach at sev- '*-"3
ral points.
Heavy Japanese reinforcements
ave been received. The Japanese
ow have three divisions in the viMessage
From President Loubet.
PARIS, June 16.?President Loubet
o-day cabled President Roosevelt a
aessage exieatuug .
he people of America over the terriile
loss of life in the burning of the
teamship General Slocum.
$ ? *? 4* v "I" $ *J* ? *J* *i* -i* *i* *5* !
J. THE WEATHER. -JM
* ~ ^
J. Fair and Warm To-Morjg
5- j||
J. WASHINGTON,, -Rggj
J. 1G.?-for. West Vi'- -O
t ers this
j. Friday. fair^gMg
**^yfg?|

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