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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, June 23, 1904, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092557/1904-06-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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Clje ^irmont ltot inrflinnin.
IS THF RFPiSBLiCA
8 2 2 2 2sa S a Bsc 2 w m - ?- ? VENTION
TO-DAY IS THE THIRD. THE LAS
REPUBLICAN GATHERING
ROOSEVELT, OF NEW
W. FAIRBANKS, O
MEN OF
THE GREATEST PARTY ON EART
PLATFORMS EVER WRIT
UNUSUAL STRENGTH
PEOPLE CONFID
THIS
CHICAGO, June 23. 1:21 P. M.?
Roll call finished, every vote in the
convention being cast for Roosevelt.
He is declared the nominee.
,2:07.?Fairbanks nominated VicePresident
by acclamation.
CHICAGO, June 23.?Every seat
was filled every delegate bubbled with
enthusiasm, every spectator thrilled
with anticipation of great convention
scenes when at 10:2S Uncle Joe Can
non folded Bis steei-nmmea sjjei.- |
tacles and, using the left arm swing,
circled the big mallet in the air and
brought it down on the table with a
boom. When he got order he said
Rev. Thaddeus Snively would pray.
The prediction was verified. RevSnively
read his prayer. TJncIe Joe
ordered a call of the States for nominations
for President.
"Alabama," called tthe clerk. Ala-bama
announced that it had the honor
to yield to the State of New York.
There was applause.
Ex-Governor Black had been chosen
to present the name of Roosevelt.
That was the signal for a great demonstration.
Flags that had been given
the delegates were waved with
vigor. Great cheers arose when
Black appeared on the julatform.
His long, lean smooth shaven lace
suggested Lincoln to some liistv
lunged delegate and he straightway
proposed three cheers for Abraham
Lincoln. They were given with a
will. "What's the matter with
Black?" asked somebody in the NewYork
delegation. "He is all right"
was the unanimous yell from the representatives
of the Empire State.
Cannon introduced Black as a former
colleague in the house and one of
the greatest orators in the country.
' CHICAGO. June 23.?Every one of
liis shafts at the Democrats and his
concise statement of Republican goodness
evoked cheers.
Black was complacent and spoke
in a calm, even strain without striving
for effects. How they strained
in. the back seats to hear what he
said. Hands were at the ears of all,
and many of them held newspapers
back of their heads to catch the
sound waves. His eulogy of Roosevelt
was given impressively without
mention of the name of the President.
The crowd listened intently but
in silence due to the facr that they
desired to hear every word.
Roosevelt's name, magic in its influence
upon this convention, was reserved
for mention at the very end
of the speech. Black led up to it
impressively, eloquently. And when
at last he named to the convention
its nominee, the party's standard
bearer, the crowd simply went wild
with enthusiasm.
CHICAGO, June 23.?A roar that
fairly shook the building went up
from the throats of the 8,000 men and
?-?nnri banners were
>V UUinu* luSw . _ ^
waved by delegates and spectators in
a frenzy of delight. Umbrellas of gay
hues added to the brilliancy of the
scene. Hats were thrown in the air.
Cannon advanced to the front of
I the platform, waved a time stained
[ flag of . historic interest. It was the
flag that was carried by the Missouri
delegation into the convention that
nominated Lincoln in 18G0. All the
delegates were standing on their
chairs, all except Senator IPlatt, of
New York, whose enfeebled condition
forbade such exertion. But as he sat
in his chair he waved weakly a big
flag.
The band struck up "A Hot Time"
but even the strains of that inspiring
air was drowned much of the time by
the pandemonium. At best the booming
of the bass drum could be heard but
faintly. At the end of three minutes
a big picture of Roosevelt was
"brought "to the. stage and if the thing
"of i304 C?*
T AND THE BEST OF THE GREAT
AT CHICAGO?THEODORE
YORK. AND CHARLES
F INDIANA, ARE THE
THE HOUR.
H WITH ONE OF THE STRONGEST
TEN, AND A TICKET OF
GOES BEFORE THE
ENT OF SUCCESS
FALL.
was possible an increase in the racket.
After five minutes of the demonstration.
the Alaskans started a
march through the aisles with their
eagles. They had a few followers. It
was too early.
The delegates wanted to simply
stand still and yell.
The Texas led in that feature in
the demonstration. A. child led them.
John Cashin, of Alabama, a handsome
child with long curly hair came to
the front of' the platform. He was
greated with a roar. An assistant
Sergeant at~Arms, a giant, lifted the
boy to his head and it was repeated.
A little girl in white, Louise Roberts,
of California, was passed up'to
the stage and the cheers were redoubled.
California brought a big
i.i? itio confer aisle and
uiuc uamiv.1 _ _ ?
led the demonstration for a few seconds.
Congressman Sherman, of New
York, secured the Lincoln flag from
Cannon, and with it as a standard
headed the New York delegation.
A parade led by Governor Herrick,
of Ohio, followed. Several other
States were also in line. The men
from Massachusetts carried red,
white and blue umbrellas. On the
stage an effort was made to line up
a little colored hoy with the other
children. He showed for a moment
and disappeared. At 11:23 when the
demonstration had lasted eighteen
minutes Uncle Joe advanced to the
front and pounding in the air with
gavel on an imaginary desk called
for order.
Reading clerk Lampson read a brief
history of the Lincoln Flag and it
was greeted with great applause.
Then Cannon enacted another dramatic
scene. Slowly waiving the old
standard he spoke impressively of the
sacredness of the flag, how it had
been baptized on a hundred battlefields
and that it was safe in the
hands of Theodore Roosevelt and under
the guardianship of the Republican
party.
The girders shook witn uie roars
that followed the little speech.
Senator Beveridge, of Indiana, was
recognized to- make the first seconding
speech. \
George A. Knight, California's spellbinder,
was called up for the next
speech. He came up amid great calls
of "Knight!" "Knight!" and was escorted
by men carrying a banner and
a big wreath.
Former Governor Yv\ O. Bradley, of
Kentucky, seconded the nomination
of Roosevelt in behalf of Kentucky.
Harry Stillwell Edwards, -postmaster
at Macon, Ga., seconded Roosevelt's
nomination on behalf of the South.
Joseph B. Cotton seconded the nomination
of Roosevelt on behalf of Alabama.
At 1:11 P. M. the roll call was ordered
for nominations.
At 1:13 P. M., New Jersey moved
nomination by acclamation, but concention
yelled "No!" and roll call was
continued, as every delegate wanted
to vote -for Roosevelt.
At 1:21 the roll call was finished,
every delegate voting for Roosevelt.
Senator Dolliver then nominated
Fairbanks for Vice-President, and he
was nominated by acclamation at 2:07.
2:13 P.M.?Senator Doinver onered
resolutions appointing Cannon
chairman of the committee to notlfy
President Roosevelt,, and Root chairman
of the committee to notify Fairbanks.
Roosevelt is to be notified
July 27, and Fairbanks August 3.
Senator Nelson offered resolutions
for the publication of the official records
of the convention. Agreed to.
2:25?Convention adjourned sine die
on motion of Graeme Stewart.
All of the latest telegraphic and
local news -will be found In the 37est
Virginian. . . .
< ?
A
I JTfh-li
Bryan (in ^900):
' ^
j Bryan (i- 1904): "Now, ye
MALONE, THE
FAILED IN (
"AGAMEMNON COMMANDED THE I
GREEKS AT THE FALL OF '
TROY" WAS THE TRIAL
SENTENCE.
3EATTY IS NOW VERY CONFI- I
DENT?SENT WORD TO HIS
MOTHER THAT HE WILL
I
BE HOME IN A FEW
DAYS. (
PARKERSBURG, W. Va., June 23. i
? (Special.)?The Illness of one of '
the jurors in the Beatty case prevented
much progress being made yester
UCJJ'.
Beatty concluded his testimony, and
W. H. Furbee was put on the stand.
His testimony was finished to-day, as
was also that of ex-Chief of Police
Diggs and Miller, a former partner
of Beatty. John R. Jones is now on
the stand.
S. C. Malone, the hand-writing expert,
failed completely on cross-examination,
and the case now stands entirely
upon circumstantial evidence.
Furbee and Miller both swear that
in their opinion the threatening letter
was not in the hand-writing of Beatty,
and he is endeavoring to prove an
alibi by Jones and others.
The case will probably go to the jury
to-mocrow.
As stated in yesterday's issue of the
West Virginian, the Beatty trial was
held up on account of the sickness
of a juror. That is why we had no
account of the proceedings yesterday?i.
e., there were none, which all
must grant is a very good excuse.
We do not manufacture messages to
order and state things which never
took place. It has befern reported that
Beatty's mother testified on Tuesday
that he was "not there** on the night
~' ~ xvei or-<a informed that
Ui CUC ? V k.. ?
she did not testify; that she has not
been to Parkersburg. Her deposition
was Sent in, but had not been introduced
as evidence at the time the
statement was published.
The Mannington Record, published
in Beatty's home town, received the
Sac <?s -if ?KS
II 1.1 Is la^P II
Ult-ftKtNUfc?ui- f-uu.i ThAh:
r
t
What r. brute a man must oc to treat n
vw. ?
>u brute, do as 1 say or I'll 'ambast you
EXPERT,
:rucial test '
.'oilowing: dispatch bearing yesterday's
date:
PARKERSBl'RG, June 22.?Yestcrlay*s
test of S. C. Malone's ability as
in expert of handwriting settled the
natter of further expert testimony in
he Blackshere hcld-up case.
Tlie sentence written by three (liferent
people that caused the downfall
of the government witness was:
"Agamemnon commanded the
ireeks at the fall of Troy."
The sentence was written three
tigies and the expert sum one uiuu ,
lid the writing.
Senator Caldwell then announced
that three persons had accomplished
it. He said the writing was done by
himself, the defendant Ed Beatty, and
Harold Houston. It developed that
Mr. Caldwell wrote the sentence and
the others copied it. Imitating almost
precisely the handwriting of the former.
It had been agreed that if the expert
failc-d in this test there was to bono
further expert testimony.
Judge Jackson held the attorneys
to their agreement.
Ed Beatty, the .accused man, took
the stand yesterday afternoon and
told of his whereabouts on the night
of the hold-up. Beatty testified that
during the night in question he was
at Jlannington and about the time of
the holdup or probably a little after
he returned home. He knew nothing
of the occurrence or of its circumstances.
He was accosted at his own threshold
by Chief of Police Hellem, of Jlannington,
and the conversation which
took place was given about as was
previously testified to by Chief Hellem.
~? -"xc-ciAn nf thp nourt
inert! was uw ? _ ?
this forenoon owing to the illness of
one of the jurors. The trial will
probably be resumed this afternoon
if the sick juror recovers.
The favorable turn affairs have
taken have made Beatty so confident
of acquittal that he wired to friends
in fliannington to tell his mother he
will be home in a few days.
, Senator Caldwell of the defense
says that the result of the test he
gave the handwriting expert shows
s.
~ ' ->
/^>s j
' I
/ #M?\ I
k Wm
J
is own party sol"
J } ,
good and plenty!" 1
?Minneapolis Journal.
r 1
what the value of the evidence ,
amounts to when Mr. Malone testifies .
rhar. one hand wrote the blackmailing (
rotter to Mr. Blackshere and the oth- j
or writings exhibited in court.
DR. CARR i
WILL PITCH FOR THE LOCAL Y. 1
M. C. A. IN SATURDAY'S 1
GAME?CLARKSBURG '
HAS A STRONG
TEAM. 1
I
Dr. Hugh Carr will pitch for the I
local Y. M. C. A. against the Claries- v
burg organization Saturday. This is c
indeed good news to the fans, for '
every one knows that his equal as an t
amateur pitcher is not found in this section.
1
it. was said that Clarksburg relied J
mostly upon its pitching staff in this
game, but reports from the up river *
town state that it is exceptionally I
strong in every department, and the *
Fairmont boys' ability to plav fast ?
bail is unquestioned by local people, 1
therefore an excellent game 155 as- J
stired. (
Plenty of cars will be furnished to
handle the large crowd which the
management expects. Game called at 1
3:?*>0 sharp.
willbF
r>\ run A \m >
UXYELAPIU
i
SAYS EX-SENATOR ALLEN?THE
DEFEAT OF THE BRYAN ELEMENT
WILL HELP THE I
POPULIST CAUSE.
LINCOLN. Neb.. June 23.?Cleve- <
land not only will be the nominee ol
the Democratic party but he will be
elected, according to ex-Senator W. V.
Allen, who secured the passage of a
resolution by the Populist convention
at Fremont Wednesday, against
fusion with the Democrats. He declared
the defeat of the Bryan ele
ment will strengthen the Populist
cause. '
First Ward Wedding. <
Robert McLarnon and Mrs. 'Lillian <
DouglassVrcere united in marriage by <
Wiley, at his home In the, J
n| HBnruecday evening.
Epciiwr. 1
1 i-,lvJUIMU gov.
pennypacker speaks of
the proud record of
pennsylvania in the
past half century.
a touching tribute to senator
quay as the friend
of the hon. charles w.
fairbanks.
CHICAGO. June 22.?-Governor Pen- ,'ijB
nypacker's speech seconding the nomiimtlon
ol Fairbanks. was as follows: T
The Republican party held Its first
convention in that city of Western iSS
Pennsylvania which in onerpry, enterprise
and wealth rivals the great
mart upon the shores of the inland
lakes, whereinafter the lapse of nearly
a century we meet today. Penn- .v
tylvanla may well claim to be the
ieader among Republican States. The
principles which are embodied in the .. .
platform of the party as we have v3g||
adopted it are the result of the Teachings
of her scholars and statesmen.
Her majorities for the nominees of 'd|||
ihe party are greater and more cor- .Jffl
-' ?~ - ? e r.*\f nthnr Stfnf#*. fV
ram iuu.ii uiuao u?. w?.-w? , ^ ^^
She alone of'all the States since the:
election of Abraham Lincoln in 1SC0
has never given an electoral vote
igalust a candidate of the Republican
party for the Presidency. She Is an- ^
selfish in her devotion. During the . |?
nearly half century-that- Is gone, no
son of hers has been elliier President
or Vice-President. She has not
ioen satisfied like the . Karl of Warwick
to be a maker of Kings.. /Shei'^Si-.t's-S
ias been content that you should have
regard to the success of ibe party ~'Z
ittd the welfare of the country rath- ; ;
:.-r than to the personal Interests of '
ic-r citizens.
The waters of the Ohio, rising in
he mountains of "Pennsylvania, roll
.vestward, hearing fertility and nten C?
o the prairie lands of Indiana. The
fhotiglit of Pennsylvania turns with "if
kindred feeling toward the State ~Z
vhlch has produced Oliver P. llor- 'o"fi
on, Benjamin Harrison and the brave ?
loosiers who fought alongside of
Reynolds on the Oak ridge at Getiys- --jg
iiurg. She well remembers that when
ier own Senator, he who did so much
or the Republican parly, and whose
vise counsels, alas! are missing tolay,
bore commission to Washington,
le had no more sincere supporter
ban the able and distinguished. -.J
statesman who then, as he does now,
cpresented Indiana in the United
States Senate.
Pennsylvania with the approval of
te'r judgment and w-ith glad ancici- -S
jation of victory in her heart, folowing
a leader, who like the Chevilier
of France, is without fear and "A
without reproach, seconds the nomi- jw
ration for the Vice-Presidency of $
Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana. \
MAY BE EXCHANGED TODAY. '3
Perdicaris and Varley Are Now
Thought to Be Nearing Deliverance.
TANGIER. June 23.?The prison- 7jA
srs who will be exchanged for Perdi- t.mt
earis and Varley left Tangier to-day /M&
in charge of the sheriff of W'azan. 11H
They will travel for Benimesnar. BS
where the exchange will take place Bl
probably to-day.
Terrible Hailstorms.
VIENNA, June 23.?Terrible ha.il- wfl
storms swept over many parts of Hi
Moravia and Hungary last night and. flj^B
to-day. Immense damage has been ' 18
done to crops and there have been >_^SH
many casualties. Twenty-three per
sons were hilled by lightning ao jjS
twenty others drowned by the ojM
flowing of the rivers. -.JM^Bt
- " "
J- THE WE^ga
i w^i

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