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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, June 25, 1904, Image 1

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?ijc JhirMMit
wvivrTTyrR T. FAIRMONT. WEST VIRGINIA. SATURDAY, JUNE 25, 1904." "
A LAND
OFFICE $
WAS DONE 3Y THE POSTOFFICE
DEPARTMENT IN SHUT
TING OUT FRAUD
ORDERS.
A. BEAUTIFUL CREOLE WIDOW
AND A RICH YOUNG LADV
HUNTING HUSBANDS.
WASHINGTON, D. C., June 25.? i
^nflr,Qrtmont rn-riav did I
uie rusiuuii;c _ ?_
a. wholesale business in Issuing fraud )
orders against business concerns and J
.private individuals. One order was directed
against Frank D. Mackey and
the Globe Advertising Agency, Back
Bay Station, Box 43, Boston. Mass.
They had a beautiful, accomplished
young lady, a graduate of Wellesley
College, with wealth untold and a
craving to get married. The agency
agreed to introduce to the lady any
young man who would join their club
3Lnd pay an initiation fee of one dollar,
and he would then have to take
his chances of capturing her.
W. J. Parks & Company, of New
York, were debarred from the mails
for alleged false pretenses in selling
a. patent medicine.
* ? a,-.- wo<= icsnorf aerainst the
Tt ii u* vitJ. ?w ?
Star Advertising Bureau and the United
Employment League. Syracuse. X.
Y-, for charging people a dollar for
telling them where they were likely to
secure employment.
E. 1L Campbell, Erie. Pa., and VY.
J. Warren, Portland, Oregon, were
also put under the ban for working
-old schemes.
F. C. Farrington, E. S. Wilson &
Co., The Beancarre Merchants' Loan
and Trust Company, all of New Orleans,
were barred from the malls for
soliciting subscriptions to play the
-cotton market. They had a beautiful
Creole widow who they advertised
wanted to marry. They also charged
for an introduction to the young lady.
fires in
lumber
yards!
?
BURNED OVER SEVEN ACRES OF
? - - ? -r-r-t rcnAnL; DOI cr?5
CfKUUINU I c.u-unnr i . ?
AND FREIGHT TRAINS
BURNED.
THE FIRES WERE OF INCEN- ;
DIARY ORIGIN?THE LOSS
WILL REACH S2CO.OOO.
CLEVELAND, June 25.?Two fires,
both of incendiary origin, broke out in
the heart of the lumber district in the
fiats, shortly after midnight.
\ The first fire was discovered among
the. lumber piles in the yards of J. X.
Hahn Company Box ManufacturingPlaxtt,
corner Cuyahoga .and Seneca
streets, a few minutes after 12 o'clock
by the night watchman of the American
Signal Company. The fire had
been started in the piles of lumber in
a somewhat secluded spot,
i While the firemen were busy turnjmg
streams of water on the still
smouldering piles of lumber an Erie
braheman saw- flames arising from
another pile in the yards of the Nico'
fo Brothers only a short distance
away.
' Here the flames spread with great
rapidity and in a very short time
more the score of lumber piles were
ablaze.
, More engine companies were* liur>
rled to the scene and soon had the
burning area surrounded with a line j
o? hose..
The flames set fire to a number of
i telegraph poles along the Erie tracks,
the wires fell and communication tvas
partially cut off. Several freight
trains that passed through the burning
district were badly scorched. Despite
the hardest efforts of the flrej
men, the flames continued tospread
and crossed Mahoning street to the
lumber yards of the Ralph Gray Lumber
Company. This also was consumed.
Total loss. $200,000. Fire
' ' was under control at 7 A. M.
i / Fire burned over seven acres; of
i Jmnber.
Hammocks, lawn swings and porch
seats are soipe the summer pleasures
, ' to be had at J. L. Hall's Hardware
> Store. _ ? . *
TOGO I
REGAINS j
PRESTIGE!
. =,n; ibj A SUCCESSFUL i
run .. . .
TURN OF AFFAIRS SOME
INTERESTING WAR
N EWS.
THINGS ARE SHAPING UP FOR
BETTER CR FOR WORSE,
AND SOMETHING WILL
SOON ' BE DOING.
LONDON, June 23.?Admiral Togo,
!jj- a brilliant attack on the Russian
fleet at Port Arthur, has, in the opinion
of military and naval experts, as
well as those in official circles, more
than regained for Japan the prestige
lost by the lack of. watchfulness in
the Korean straits, which permitted
the Russian Vladivostock squadron
to creep in and sink two transports
and disable a third. While the details
of the fighting at Port Arthur are
not yet at hand there is little doubt
that the commander of the Russians
was driven to desperation and at- '
tempted a hazardous escape from
Japanese surveillance, and failed.
According to Admiral Togo's official
dispatch, received in Tokio this
morning, there was an engagement
Thursday and the Russians lost a battleship
of the Peresiveit type, sunk,
and had a battiesmp ana a m
cruiser badly damaged. The Japaness
fleet sustained but little damage.
There is Ijttle doubt that Witgert's
attempt in many points was similar |
to that of Admiral Cervera's, when
he tried to escape the watchful eye
of the Americans off Santiago during
the Spanish-American war.
Witgert, like Cervera, was locked (
up in a harbor, with a strong force
of the enemy's vessels outside, anxious
to draw him out to battle in the
open sea. Reports lately received from
Port Arthur describe the Russian sea
force there as a patched up affair. <
DOWN !
WITH A j
CRASH
CAME SECTIONS OF THE WALL
OF A HOUSE CONTAINING
EIGHT FAMILIES.
NEW YORK, .Tune 25.?While 18
families, 11 umbering 150 persons, in
the flat house at No. 1G1 East 114 th
street, were asleep early this morning
two large sections of a sidewall of
the building facing a deep excavation
on the east gave way, crashing into
the - excavation with a roar that
awakened the neighborhood. The occupants-,
were thrown into a terror
of feai^and believing that the house i
was "about to topple on their heads,
they rushed to the street, the majority
of them too frightened to save
any clothing. Police reserves were
soon on the scene. They forced the
crowds that had collected back, and
after making an examination of the
building they decided that it would be
unsafe for occupancy until additional
shoring had been piled in position.
Then began a scramble among the
scantily clothed tenants for beds
in the neighborhood for the night. It
was two hours before the last indignant,
yet fearful one, had been cared
for. the neighborhood rising to the
occasion with offers of shelter for all.
t-uo foundation of the building had
been weakened by the excavation ad(
joining and this caused portions of
the wall to topple out.
V V %- V V V V -I* V '2- ~b
LAWN FETE.
* *
4- The Rath bone Sisters of ?.
J., Pythian Temple No. 5, will
h hold a "Lawn Fete on Dr. J. H. .f.
-J- Binns' lawn, 324 Jefferson street, -J*
;* on Saturday, June 25, commeac- v
J- ing at G o'clock P. M. They will Jv
have charge of the merry-go- v
J- round. All are-cordially invited ??
J. to attend and aid in making the ?
J. affair a social as well as a .J*
financial success. .J.
A .j.
v v -r- -I* -! ! 4* ? v -r *1* "v*
?????????
Ask for Hall's?the best ice cream
in Fairmont. ' x
LIS I
fOEND
THE WAR I
rv i:, v [
Ill LiiJI j
S THE STRONGEST DESIRE OF!
KING EDWARD?HE AND THE
KAISER WILHELM WILL
TALK IT OVER.
<IIMG EDWARD BELIEVES THE
KAISER CAN BE OF GREAT
ASSISTANCE TO THE
PLAN.
KIEL., June 25,:?Your correspond- v"
jnt has received the following auhoritative
information regarding the
subjects which will be discussed by
he Kaiser and King Edward during ,
heir private conference. For some
.ime past political considerations
iiave prevented King Edward from ,
offering his services as mediator directly
to the Czar owing to the extremely
hostile feeling against Eng
land now prevailing in Russia. ,
. King Edward's idea is that the .
Kaiser would be the most suitable
person to approach the Czar on be- .
half of England. If England made a '
proposal of mediation Russia would ,
certainly regard it wiui ucei< .iuo: ^
picion. but coming from King Edward }
through the Kaiser, it would have a ^
better chance of acceptance by the :
Czar. King Edward desires to ter- ^
minate the war for vdrious reasons. t
He is anxious that Japan shall not be 2
too successful in this war, firstly because
a too powerful Japan might ,
ruin English trade in the Far East: ,
secondly, because if Japan's overwhelming
victory makes the yellow ?
danger an actual menace to Western j
countries. The King fears Christendom
will reproach him as the sovereign of j
die country whose moral support enabled
Japan to begin the war and con- .
elude it successfully without interference
from other powers.
King Edward desires to mediate ,
at. the earliest possible moment, giving
Japan some reasonable fruits of
victory, sufficient to damage Russian ;
prestige in Asia for many decades to ,
come but not sufficient to make Ja- ,
pan too uppish and aggressive. Eng- .
land would then be regarded as a .
friend and benefactor both by Japan j
and Russia, while Christendom would .
shower praises on England for put- ,
J on the
ting an. tfiiu iu me ?
battle fields of the Far East in the (
interests of humanity and civilization, j
King Edward would be universally |
regarded as the great statesman and ,
diplomat of the day and England
would be more than ever the predominant
power in the world's affairs. It
is a great scheme, but the Kaiser's
assistance as a channel of communication
between King Edward and the
Czar is necessary before it can be
inaugurated. King/Edward hopes to
secure this assistance before he
leaves Kiel.
Fiduciary.
Thomas F. pucker has qualified as
guardian of G. iV. Tucker, deceased.
He gave bond of $8,000.
Joseph Nuzuni is seriously sick at
his home on Fairmont avenue. He is
a brother of the late Ellas Nuzum
and was not able to attend the .funeral
of Mrs. Nuzum yesterday,
tNlfMU IU HIS KiflSltn'b
ON TOUR
FOR HOME
TO=DAY
SENATOR FAIRBANKS WILL BE
MET BY THRONGS OF HIS
FELLOW CITIZENS.
THE PLAN IS TO REACH INDIANAPOLIS
AT 7:15 THIS EVENING,
CENTRAL TIME.
CHICAGO, June 25.?Senator C.
W. Fairbanks. Vice Presidential nomtneef
will start to-day at l o'clock on
a triumphal tour to his home in Indianapolis.
In the party will be Mrs.
Fairbanks, Frederick C. Fairbanks,
son of the Senator, and a number of
prominent Indiana Republicans. They
will have a special car on the big four
train. The members of the Indiana
delegation to the National convention
have arranged for the series
of celebrations to be held at various
towns between here and Indianapolis.
The .first stop will be at Fowler. Indiana,
where five minutes will be
given. At Lafayette the party will
stop for twenty minutes. A special
train will he in"waiting there and will
t>e run for the remainder of the distance
on a schedule for the conveniences
of the party, ft has been ar
- -?-?. ... ova.
ranged to stop ten mmuics .u
fax. ten minutes at Thorntown. fifeen
minutes at Lebanon and five
ninutes at Zanesville.
The plan is to reacli Indianapolis
it 7: 1T? o'clock. Senator Fairbanks
vill be met by a procession, including
several organizations and his friends
ind neighbors, and escorted to his
tome.
BEATTrS FATE
THE FATE OF ED BEATTY IS
MOW IN THE HANDS OF THE
IURY. AT 2:30 A MESSAGE OVER
THE LONG DISTANCE 'PHONE
STATES THAT JUDGE BLIZZARD
CONCLUDED THE ARGUMENT
-OR THE GOVERNMENT THIS
Y.ORNING AND THE JURY RETIRED
AT 11 O'CLOCK. AT 12:30
MO DECISION HAD BEEN REACHED
AND FURTHER INSTRUCTION
A*AS ASKED FROM THE COURT..
THE JURY ALSO ASKED FOR A
REPETITION OF PART OF THE
EVIDENCE OF CHIEF OF POLICE
HELLEM, OF MANNINGTON. AT
2:15 THE JURY AGAIN RETIRED
AND THE VERVICT IS EXPECTED
a-r- AM v TIME.
League to Be Formed.
Arrangements are now being made
lo form a West Virginia baseball
league between the cities of Parkersburg,
Morgantown, Fairmont, -Mannington,
Clarlcsburg, Piedmont, Sistersville
and Marietta will also be
included owing to her proximity to
West Virginia. Regular umpires will
be appointed and a schedule will be
made out at once, and with good support
from the fans there is no reason
why the league should not be a success
and with Farkersburg a leading
team.?State- Xonrnal.
It's so easy to- say?-Hall's Ice
cream. ^ f x
- b-Jjas* -y- V.-, ' mKsrtm-^xgi;
Hl/t.
^ ^ i
OLP \ i
f?gpj CYLINDER \ i i|
IB36-I^OO-I9O^J
?Wanhinnrnn fitar.
FREEDOM
IS GIVEN
ATI A CT
HI LHOI
TO PERDICARIS AND VARLEY?
ADMIRAL CHADWICK COMMUNICATES
THE NEWS.
GREAT OVATION IN THEIR HONOR
BY BOTH NATIVES AND
FOREIGNERS AT TANGIER.
WASHINGTON, June 25.?The release
of Perdicaris and .Maxley .and
their arrival at Tangier, was officially
communicated to the Navy Department
to-day in cablegram from
Rear-Admiral Chad wick. He say.s
that the captives reached Tangier at
midnight last night and that they
were well. He reports further that
the British Minister has sailed for
Gibraltar en route to England, and
suggests that as there is now no reason
for the further presence of an
American squadron at Tangier, the
ships desire to continue their cruise
on Monday. He will be ordered by
the Department to do this.
TANGIER. June 25.?Ion Perdicaris
and Cromwell Y'arley, who were captured
by the bandit Raisuli, have just
arrived here.
Perdicaris is very much fatigued after
his long ride, but says he is glad
to get back. He is greatly pleased
with the reception accorded him by
the townsmen who met him in great i
j numbers.
| Perdicaris suffered many hardships i
J while in the hands of Raisuli, al- j
{though he says he does not uuuk i
j that these were the fault of the ban- ;
j die chief, and that he had every com- j
i fort possible under the circumstances.
Varley appeared to be as cheerful
and bright as if he had just returned
from a picnic.
Both Perdicaris and Varley are
much thinner, particularly the former,
who has aged considerably. Perdicaris
was received at his town house j
by the authorities and admirals of the j
fleets and numerous personal friends.
His Moorish servants made a great
demonstration of joy. kissing his
hands and clothes.
i
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gaston arrived
in the city this morning. They and
Miss Cora Dudley left Los Angeles
about two weeks ago and visited
Coleman Morris, formerly of this city,
at Seattle, Washington. Miss Dudley
remained there. Mr. and Mrs. Gaston
stopped off at the St. Louis Fair
on their way here.
i
Band Concert.
The Greater Fairmont Baud will
render the following program this
evening:
1. March?Cap. McCormick's. By
Broc'enshire.
2. Selection?Bohemian Girl. By
Balfe.
3. Two Step?Tonkawa. By Story.
4. Trombone Solo?Only a Dream of
That Beautiful City?Sam L. Ridenour.
\
5. March.?Dinuba. By Snyder.
G. Characteristic ? Indian War
Dance. By Bellstedt. "
7. March?Citizen Soldier. By Tayiii
d'WOllfflKBiiBItt riiilKB
I lit liut^^
TURNED ^
OUR WAY
THE FAIRMONT BOYS BRACED
UP AND GOT ONE GAME AS
A TROPHY OF THE
WEEK.
. ? all
(Staff Correspondence.) .rS
CUMBERLAND, Md.. June 24.?The ;
Fairmont, base ball team evened up C-i
to-day and defeated the . Cumberland
team by a score of nine ti, seven#
both sides ranking four errors, mose , .r
by Fairmont being the most costly^
* Qualey was In the box for Fairmont,
and pitched a fine game, only seven jjj
bits being made off his-delivery. WS?1
Miller, for Cumberland, was fef- ' "?
feetive in the first part of the game, V;
but iu the seventh inning tho Fairmont
boys jumped^ onto his delivery .
and bumped, it to all corners of the lot.
Cumberland started In with a rush,
and at the beginning of the seventh - i
inning had a lead of four runs, but at
the beginning of the last half of the \iia
ninth had reversed the order. Cum- "
berland made things look dangerous ? ;2
in its last half of the ninth by scor- ^?3
ing two runs, but the last, man grounded
out to Qualoy with two men on , _
bases.
Core and Gibbs had two and three -'Jy
hits respectively, all being two baggers.
McDonald's fielding and Core's as- -?
sist from right field, were fielding fea- . ffl
tures for Fairmont. Humbid, in left. ' '
made a nice running catch.
The boys leave for Frostburg to- :
night with renewed confidence, and i;||
with Lefty Core In the box, will work es
hard for victory. Frostburg Is playing
fine ball now, and Fairmont will gj
have to work hard.
Following Is the line-up and 6core: . fig
Fairmont. A.B. R. H. O. A. E.
Stillwell, 2b 3 1 2 2 3 3 v#
McDonald, s.s. . f> 0 1 4 4 0
Helm. 3b. r....3 0 1 2 0 0
Bryson. lb ....5 1 1 10 0 0 Jf
Gibbs. 1 5 2 3 0 0 0
Core. r. 3d 5 2 2 2 0 1.
Stewart, c ....5 2 1 5 0 0 . M
Wavman, r.t ...3 11 1 0 O
Qtialev, p 4 0 0 1 3 . O .
Totois. . . .40 ?1 12 27 10 4 . Cigj
Cumberland. A.B. R. H. O. A. E.
Hiimbid. 1 ....3 1 0 2 0 0 'S;
.Mellluger, in . .5 2 1 0 0 O ' ,:Sg
Bigbee. s.s 5 3 2 1 4 0 $j<||
Brophy. 2b ... .4 0 0 5 2 2
Hetz, lb 3 1 0 10 1 Q ,/||
Lauglilin, c 5 0 2 3 0 O
4 0 1 4 2 2
Rliodebaugh, r . <4 0 1 1 0 0
Miller, ii 3 0 0 1 0 0 ,iM
Totals. . . .30 7 7 27 !) 4 '1"
Score By Innings.
Fairmont. . . .0 0 I 0 0 0 .3 3 2?9 .
Cumberland . .3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2?7 ' ?|
Summary.
Earned Runs?Fairmont 3. Cumber- . ,j
Two Base Hits?Glbbs (3). Core 7 7
(2). V.'ayman. .
First Base on Balls?Off Miller 3, -J'
off Qualey, 0. . % ' Be
ft on Bases?Fairmont C. Cum- -'if
berlaad. S.
Struck Out?By Miller, 2; by Qua- 7
4- . /
Double flays?Scott and Brophy.' . :s
Passed Balls?Stewart 2.
Hit by Pitcher?Stillwell. '*
Stolen~~lJas&s?Mellinger and .Metz. 'S
Secrifice Hits:?Metz.
? r
Time or Game?1:25.
Umpire?Manlove.
Special Weather Bulletin. '-'"V?w|
WASHINGTON,- D. C., June 25.? - rj|f
The Weather Bureau Issued the fol- , '
lowing special bulletin: * .-.v. / ife'SaB
"The present warm wave will be Jy
broken in the lower Ohio Valley and/>
| the Western Lake region to-night, iii .
j the upper Ohio Valley and the JEasterfti J
j Lake region Sunday and inthelliddWe
Atlantic States and Western
I vnMnnft hv Sunday night, and
boYollowed by^^^o^thre^da^^^3
moderate temperature. t...
THE WEA^^
Cooler TagjSgj
WASimjm
25.?Fodfl
ersjfl|

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