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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, June 25, 1904, Image 2

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HSMHP^ ^ * -?
^J^ROOSEVELT AND FAIRBANKS ARE
U TYPICAL AMERICAN CITIZENS?CAREERS
OF "ACTIVITY.
PITTSBURG. June 24.?Theodore
Roosevelt was born In Xew "York, Oc;
" tober 27, 1S58. He was educated privately
and at Harvard, from which he
was graduated in ISSO; then for a
vear traveled in Europe, which later.
V at intervals he revisited, and in issi
V published bis first book, "The Naval
War of 1S12," characterized like his
subsequent works, by 'creditable research,
general accuracy and visorpitsstatement.
He carae into yoiitics
as a champion of civil sot-vice
principles. In the autumn of issj
:i-V he tvas Elected to the State Assembly
:o of New York from the Twenty-Hirst
j: district, and served in that body eogtinnously
until issi. He in! rutin cod I
into the -Assembly the first civil - |
o . vice bill, passed."in 1SS3. In ISSI he j
fk \ was chairman of 'he Now Yurie'dole- ;
fgSation to the Naficn.vi Repubiieaji j
f. convention. He was nnuiinak-d i: i
- ' *
^y:^.;^\-"'v;l:SS.6 as an indepetuierit candidate for
lY - , the. New York mayorality, Tpm, thcmjrh j
- he received Republican indorsement., i
was defeated by Abram S. Hewitt, |
if.": candidate or the'United Democracy.!
j^-.VJ , vvho was-elected by about. 22,000' obi- !
yU rali ty.
.in May, '1889, Mr. Roosevelt
y..\; made by President Harrison a mom- I
o. ber of the United States civil service j
ry: - commission, in which pest he coil tin- j
' ned until May. 1S95. 'During this six i
years' incumbency he endeavored to j
apply tne test 01 merit uj it.. ?'
tive positions, with the result that the
commission assumed a position of importance
it has never since lost, and
civil service law gained a new vi;
tality. At the beginning of his term
of service, 14,000, at its close, in.noo
employes held their positions under
the rules of the civil service.
A Police Commissioner.
From the civil service commission
Mr. Roosevelt resigned to become
president of the board of New. York
police commissioners during the administration.
of Mayor Strong. At
once he undertook the task of thorough
reorganization. Among the
principles insisted upon by him was
an impartial application of the civil
service idea to appointment to the police
force and promotions in it. By
his rigorous enforcement of laws and
ordinances he gave unwonted effectiveness
to the oflicc. This post he
relinquished in 1S97 to become Assistant
Secretary of the Navy under Secretary
John D. Long in the first administration
of President McKinley.
Ouicklv acciuirins the extensive do
tailed Knowledge necessary to his*
post, he began to urge that prepara
tion of the navy for warfare which
contributed so signally to the triumph
of the American arms at the SpanishAmerican
Avar. He called for two approjDriations
of respect ively $ SO 0,0 00
|07 and $500,000, for ammunition for naval
target practice. And though this
was at the time deemed extravagant,
it was later amply justified by the
skill of American gunners as shown
at Manila and Santiago.
On May 0, 1S9S, Mr. Roosevelt re- j
signed his Assistant Secretaryship to !
enter the army. His experience in j
1884-8 in the Eighth regiment, N"ational
Guard of New York, in which
he had for a time served as captain,
furnished some basis for his military
career. ; He joined Leonard Wood,
captain hnd surgeon, U. S. A. (nowmajor
general. U. S. A.), in recruiting
the First United States volunteer
caA'alry, of which he became lieutenant
colonel, with Wood as colonel.
Notwithstanding he was second in
command, his regiment, composed to
a large extent or cowboys and Hunters,
was popularly known as
"Roosevelt's Rough Riders." On July
1, 1SSS, he i the victorious charge
of the Rough Riders and the Ninth
-* cavalry up San Juan hill, on July 11
was promoted colonel, and in September
was mustered outr
1-.-- V Governor cf New "York.
\ On September 27 he was nominated
\as Republican candidate for Governor
\of New York, obtaining 753 ballots
*\o 218 for Gov. F. S. Black. He enfeared
on an active campaign, visiting
n^arly every portion of the State;
B wc\'n the support of many independent
^Retoublicans and Democrats, and was
felted by a plurality of 18,079 over
fipemecratic opponent. Judge AuBfckVan
Wyck. Mr. Roosevelt at
to sanction the use of
J^^^connection with the vVice
HHHHfrto McKinley's second
^^^s nominated by acIRiggttonal
Republican
-..? <* jy - '* *y iy. ,
'$000BM0$0%KJ!^':
ANDIDATES i
*T'* "1- "( "f ~V ~T' ~i "i ~?r"
j .
the Presidential chair. On Septern- |
ber 14. 1001, he arrived at Buffalo, j
where the oath was administered by j '
fT,,Y1o-a, n T? !
UHUVU CiLctlcs yiouiv-t Kt
Hazel. Upon his accession he announced
-hat he would continue the
policy of McKinley, whose Cabinet
he retained; and his first act was to
declare the 10th of September a day
of National mourning and prayer.
During his political life Mr. Roose- j
volt's political pen has been constant- ;
ly busy. He has written on a variety
of subjects, including game ami hunting,
history, biography ami political j
affairs. His further publications are: !
"Hunting Trips of a Ranchman," o. j
"Life of T.- K. Benton." a "JHfe of'
Goiiveraeur Morris," "Ranch Life.and j
Hunting Trail." "History of the City ';
of Now* York." "Essays on Practical i
Politics." "The Wilderness Hunter," i
"The "Winning or the West." "Amer-'
lean Ideals," "The Rough. Riders," a!
"Life of Oliver Cromwell," . "The
Strenuous Lite," lie wrote also in a
eoilec11on " H$ro Tales Frpm A
ican"History/* with Hi C. Lodge, and
the "Doer Pa ratty." ,
T! i e f > es t o f h i s 1 >bo k 3 i s"" TI; \ V i *;
hi rig of the; \VestV the tiarro rive of
t he conqu031 of the Uni; o I Shit -;:s : -rur.ory
wesf ot the Alleghanios. which
rakes jgood rank among authoritative
works on United States history.
AM OHIO FAHWER 3GV
W HQ SEC A M E A S ? N A T O R.
Charles Warren Fairbanks, the Re
publican candidate for Vice-President,;
was born on a farm" rear Unionvillo '
Center, Union county, Ohio, on May |
11, 1S52. His father. L-orison AT. Fairbanks,
was a Vermonter and was one !
of the pioneers of the Buckeye State,:
where he settled in US'IG, and the son
spent his youth in working 011 the farm
with liis father. He was natrurally j
of a studious bent. and. like Cincoln.
he spent every moment he could spare ;
in poring over his books. After he had !
finished the district school lie prepar- j
ed himself for college, and was grad- !
tinted with distinction from Ohio Wes-i
leyati University in 1S72. During his!
senior year he was editor of the **\Ves- I
tern Collegian," and as a result of
this his first work after he left Delaware
was with the Associated Press.
He was agent for the Associated
Press in Pittsburg and later in
Cleveland, and in the intervals of his
work he studied law. In 1ST4 he i
was admitted to the bar at Columbus,
and in the same year moved to Indianapolis.
There he has lived ever since
and has come to be a leader of the
bar in his State. He never held public
office until lie was elected to the
United States Senate on January 10.
1897, although lie had been active in
politics for years before that time.
He was chairman of the Republican
State conventions of 1892 and 1S9S,
and in 1S93 was the Republican can
UUIUIC* 1CJI miL ??c*.o
ed by the Democratic candidate. David
Turpie. He was delegate-at-large
to the Republican National convention
at St. Louis in 1S96 and- was its temporary
chairman.
Senator Fairbanks* first conspicuous
public service was in 1 SOS, when
he was a member of the United States
and British joint commission. He
took an active parr in the adjustment
of the questions relating to Canada
which came before that body, especially
those having reference to the
seal fisheries of Alaska. Since 1SS5
Senator Fairbanks has been a trus+
r,f liic nlmn mp(f>r ami in 1 >\Sf)
he built a handsome gymnasium for
the institution. He lias always taken
a lively interest in its welfare.
Named a College Mate.
Immediately after he was admitted
to the bar Senator Fairbanks was
married to Cornelia Cole, with whom
he had attended college at Delaware.
Mrs. Fairbanks is herself very well
known, serving just now her third
term as president general of the
Daughters of the American Revolution.
The children, in the order of their
ages, are. the daughter, Adelaide, wife
of Ensign John W. Timmons, of the U.
S. S. Kearsarge; Warren G\, director
of the Oliver Typewriter works, in
Chicago, who was married in January
to TIeJene Ethel, Cassidy, daugh
Brackenrldge avenue, Pittsburg; Frederick
C., a graduate of Princeton University,
class of 1003, and who is now
a student at the Columbian University
Law School in Washington, D.
C. The third son, Richard, is in the
junior year at Yale College, and the
fourth son, and youngest child, Robert,
is a student at Phillips' Academy,
Andover, Mass., preparing for Princeton.
Senator Fairbanks' mother is still
Uying, and is nearly 75/ears of age.
SjL^Continued on sixjn Page.)
SB&&!ra&n8EKMtofranHaSflSnBats?flwML \?.-w
MEDICAL BLACK ART
OMENS OF GOOD AND BAD LUCK AND THE
USE OF CHARMS.
Catting Oft Disease by u Barricade
of Weapon* and Toolb.
Methods of Conjuring Away Wnrt? ;
ami Corns?Tlie Rahhit's Foot Cu**-. j
The greatest geniuses In the world i
fvere superstitious, and a study of the ;
exhibit at the ^National museum illus- j -
trating medical black art, primitive j
practice of medicine and omens of ill j
and good luck will be sufficient to con- j
vince the most skeptical that learned, j
and Ignorant alike throughout the !
world ? civilized and heathen ? have
their.own peculiar beliefs.
This interesting and carious coJlee- j
tion has a tendency to carry one back i
to the days when black art flourished ;
and charms were believed to effect
more euros than medicine arid doc- j
tors. Notwithstanding the fact that ;
such advancement has been made In !
medical science that a sane man should I
feed entirely complacent when ordered '
to place himsblf under the , care of a;
physician for the treatment or* a dis- ;
ease, believers in black art who inhabit
the Eastern Shore of -Maryland and the
rice plantations of South Carolina go
right along, putting their faith in ;
onions and voudoo doctors, while per- ,
sons in Japan arr.l China swallow dried
ecu bipeds and spider dust.
The rich in both Japan and China
pay the physic-inn a fixed salary -=.?
as the patient is well, but it* ,
i: - 1111 i fa lis then the pay ceases until :
the ; .-e? - : Itas set him right auuin.
The i.'otjr '.'imnet do this: hccct; a strict
iu hereuce to soine Cprtii of vfaitb cure"
or black art; la Japan n pill nlode of
common earth, rose wafer. musk. spider
'.lust ami coated with gold leaf is
he He veil to be oblcaeious in almost ever
v ordinary disease. In Russia there
i.s . i stro r.g- 11.-a n I::g towa rd the idea i
That everything lies in preventives, and
a sick person's bed Is .'frequently shut
in wi t h : xcs. hatchets. Swords. k! 1 ives
ami other edged tools so that all disease
uia.v be "cut off." Cold baths are
not infrequently given i:i cases of fever.
The3' run the "hut devil*'- out. and ;
if this does not do the work?euro 01* j
kill?a big dose of common gunpowder :
is administered.
That the rules of sorcery?biac-k art?
are varied according to location is j
proved by a card attached to the left j
hind foot of a graveyard rabbit aud ;
which if carried in the left hand pocket
of a pair of trousers will ward off all
manner of disease, from cholera infantum
to a desire to run for the presidency.
The rabbit's foot is a cure all
for the negroes and poor whites in everv
southern state, and its powers are .
known and appreciated even in localities
north of Mason aiul Dixon's line.
The rabbit's foot keeps off the whole
category of evil spirits as well as h
cures every known disease. The com- mon
buckeye ranks next to the rabbit's
foot as a cure and preventive, and
there are several specimens. The buckeye
has its advocates in every state in
the Union, and "testimonials" from
persons in every town and hamlet \
could be secured to prove that nothing j ^
under the sun can work such wonders ;~
as the buckeye?sure cure tor rheunia- j
tism, gout, dyspepsia, lame back, j
stringbalt. deafness, lax memory, etc. j
Next in line of efficacy is the dried
Irish potato, which must be carried in
the right hand pocket and never permitted
to be handled by a woman's '
hand. If directions are carried out
the potato will keep the person free "
from dizziness, backache, headache,
smallpox, chills, fever, loss of sight, 1
deafness, corns, bunions and a dozen
or more other ailments to which flesh
is heir. A remedy for whooping cough Is
given upon one of the neat white
cards in the case with these other
cures. A lock of hair is to be cut
from the head of tin? child having the <
disease and put between two pieces of bread.
The sandwich is then fed to j
the family (log, and if he eats it the
chlUrl will not get well, but if he
coughs it up, then the child will recover
right away. To ward off evil (
one of the cards advises repeating:
God made man, and man made money; God
made the bee, and the bee made
honey;
God made Satan, and Satan made sin;
God made a big- hole to put Satan in.
"When Mr. Carnegie was in Wash- J
ington at the dedication of the library
which he gave to the city he was walking
with Commissioners West and
Mncfarland, and, seeing a pin on the
pavement, he stooped and picked it
up. A card is in the case at the museum
reading:
See a pin and pick it up,
And all your life you'll have good luck.
See a pin and let it lie;
You'll come to want before you die. i
A brass key down the back is guaranteed
to stop nose bleeding, and a medium
sized key is on exhibition to
give the proper size to be used. Sev-*
eral knots tied in a piece of cotton
thread show the manner of conjuring
warts and causing them to leave any =
part of the human body. For every
n Vnnt tr? n thread, bnrv where -
no one can see, and when the thread
rots the warts will disappear. Another
wart remover is to pick the wart
with a needle until the hlood comes
end then wipe the hlood off with a
linen rag and bury rag nnd needle at the
hour of 5:15 under a sassafras
hush.
A sure corn cure Is given in the following
prescription: Repeat a Scriptural
passage immediately after wait- (
lug up In the morning, turn over twice
and face the east, then rub the corn or
corns with spittle. Three applications "
three mornings in succession will remove
the anno.vers.
To persons adhered with night sweats j
Is promised a speedy euro If they will
place a bowl or pan of cold water under
the hod in which they sleep, and
those who suffer from cramps need ,
.
(Continued on Third Page.) |?
V v, -.
PROFESSIONAL. CARDS.
LAWYERS.
JAS. A. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, TV. Va.
Office, E. A. Fleming Building.
JOHN L. LEHMAN,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT. W. Va.
Office, Hail Block.
A. u. SIH^LCI,
Attorney at Law.
FAIRMONT, AAA Va.
Office, T. V.*. Fleming Building.
W. 3. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, AV. A"a.
Office. Hall Block.
A. !_. LEHMAN,
Attorney at Lav/.
FAIRMONT, AAA Va.
Office, Hail, Block. '
C.~H. LEEDSAttorney
at Law,
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
Office. Hall Block.
HARRY SHAW,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, AV., Va.
Office, Haymoiul Id'tlg., Jefferson 3t.
E. M. SHOW ALTER,
Attorney at Law.
FAIRMONT. AV. Va.
Wee in AV. A. Fleming Building.
T. N. PARKS,
A ;v>rr,ey at I,aw.
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
. :j .Mail, S'.. 0[i;)osite Court-house:
A. S. FLEMING,
Attorney at Law.
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
Office. I-'- Main Street.
W. F. HABTLEY. Attorney
at Law.
FAIRMONT. \V. Va. _
Office, First. National Bank Building.
t'HYSICTANS.
C. O. HENRY, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon.
FAIRMONT, XV. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hall Block.
H. R. JOHNSON, M. D?
Practice Limited to the Eye. Ear, Ncse
and Throat.
FAIRMONT, \V. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hall Block.
DR. L. B. BURK,
Treatment, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
OFFICE, 304 MAIN STREET.
Hours?12 to 3 P. M., 7 to 9 P. M.
Otherv.-ise by Appointment.
JOHN R. COOK, M. D?
FAIRMONT, XV. Va.
Office at Hospital.
DR. D. L. L. VOST,
Office 225 Jefferson Street.
Residence, new building, Fairmont ave.
DR. V. A. SELBY,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office in Cunningham Block.
W. C. & JESSE A. JAMISON.
Physicians and Surgeons,
FAIRMONT, XV. Va.
Office 30G Main Street.
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL,
F. W. Hill, M. D.?Corner of Quincy
and Jackson street. Office Hours:
10 A. M. to 12 M., 7 to 9 P. M.
DR. EUGENE W. LOMAX,
312 Main St.. Fairmont, XV. Va.
HOURS?S to 11 A. II.; 2 to 5 P. M.;
5 to 9 P. II. Consolidated 'Phone 331.
LUCl AN N. YOST, M. D.,
Electric Physician and Surgeon.
City Office Over Mansbach's Store.
Hours?10 to 12 A. II., 2 to 4 P. M-,
5 to S P. II. Res. hours?7 to 9 A.
M., 12 to 2 P. II., a to 6 P. II.
DENTISTS.
Dr. A. R. BADGLEY,
DENTIST: Vitalized Air Given for
* *?7 41 "O i/ ? O C PmO.
ClVULlffeX 1 J. -LVW 311 VJ VA . a- XLXV.U 1.VV.V
sonable. All Work Guaranteed.
Dr. J. O. McNEELY,
DENTIST.
Main Street,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
DR. W. J. BOYDSTON,
Dental Surgeon.
Office, 107 Main street. Opposite
Postofiice.
L. G. ICE,
DENTIST.
Porcelain Work a Specialty.
Yost Building.
OPTICIANS.
A. O. &. H. H. HEDGES,
Jewelers and Opticians,
329 Water Street.
Export Watch and Optical Work.
Over 20 years' experience.
VET ERIX A RIA N SURGEON.
DR. JAMES E, MAGEE,
Veterinarian Surgeon and Dentist.
Office at Chilson & Clay-tor's Livery
Stable. Bell 'Phone 104 R.
ONLY $1.00 TO WHEELING
\rd Return, Sunday, June 26, via Baltimore
& Ohio Railroad.
Tickets sold for special train leavng
Fairmont at 7:55 A. M. Returnng,
special train will leave "Wheeling
it 6:00 P. M.
PLATFORM MEETS
FOREIGN FAVOR
LONDON TIMES SAYS DOCUMENT
EXCITES ADMIRATION BECAUSE
OF ITS GREAT
STRENGTH.
LOXDOX, June 24.?The Times,
the only London morning paper which
prints an editorial on the platform
adopted by the .National Republican
convention at Chicago, says that the
platform bears the stamp of the Individuality
of President Roosevelt, and
excites admiration for its adroitness,
as well as for its strength.
"Adroit it unquestionably is," says
the Time's, "but save in the few points
where the hand of the politician is visibly
impressed upon it, it seems to be
bold and clear and consistent. What
the judgment of the people will be
it, would be neither prudent nor politic
at present to forecast, but be it
what it may, it must determine great
issues not for the "United States alone,
but for civilized mankind."
City and Country.
"This," said the city nephew, who
xvas showing Uncle Si the beach,
emphasizes the difference between
the country and the city. Now, here
you will see the height of fashion in
a I hi ng cos tnrnes_ and"?
"Yep." said Uncle Si. "Down ter
burn we undress ter go* swirn min" an*
dress up ter go to a dance, an." here
J-it's .test tlie other way. about.
Special low prices on all Trimmed
! I-Iats at The Bon Ton. x
toi \
ii 9 eh I
TRAN
Hauling of all kinds. Mc
pianos a
Residence, .illy Merchant street.
Office on Parks avenue- next to
Skinner's Tavern. Fairmont, W.
Va.
>: ,?S .?? ,_?t X r! .<t xs < ._Jt .<
.ji ,<t ,?? xi .jt ._ { xt ._ ? ,>5 , < ._ * x
V *
** Tl
]\ FAIRMONT Wl
?>' CLASSY
v V
ii Foiiowina
EXCEL.
y- v
V V
v v 1. Its constant ai!
v v and Trustwortl
r r 2. It doesn't go m
^ v prefers Facts,
r, n 3. It classifies it
v * with. care.
V V
v v 4. It deals fairly
v treating- all all
^ 5. It has a full
v v graphic service
r- * 6. It gives more
y ?
y y any otner pape
7. It puts tlie nev
r * teresting and
n ou
y y. Axt/i .
*- *. 8. It furnishes we
r * matter for all
*- \ family.
r v 9. It is a "Booster
2 * it doesn't welc
y v does it expect c
lo. It is repub:
^ and is not afra
r v say so.
? v 11. It lias an Edit
^ ^ timely discus
r v antries.
*-* v- 12. It is considers
J ^ of people and e:
v v at all times.
Iv j If youfare not a s
I! J one to-day.
* Ten <
- TERMS: fi'Si
y ? $4.0(
y y
* r. Delivered "by car:
^ \ of tin
v- * s.
ao so jo ao^teo so jp ao jo ao ao jo ao
I.- a? jp so jfe jo jo ao a#1 af ao ao jo
~i?? fa ill'
CHEAP EXCURSIONS
To the St. Louis World's Fair, via Baltimore
and Ohio Railroad.
Every Tuesday in June, only S13.0?>
round trip from FairmontTickers
will be good going in ,
! coaches only cn specified train, and
in coaches or regular trains returning
not later than ten days, including
date cf saleCall
on ticket agents for time of
| train and full information.
i M&? A ***** If
^-OQK Y
A \ ?^j
f* di?5si fiirf.
EVERY DIME 13 A 3A3Y DOLLAR
true of a penny, too. Want to see it
grow to a lusty youth, then a strong
man?' Put the pennies and dimes in
your little home bank, bring the dollars
here, which we will safeguard in
luftfotixra iriVflSt
; cuizstsrv any c, J-CI, ^ ? ~~ 1
meats, pay you four (4) per cent, interest
on them, and then interest on
jboth, principal and interest, until
I you'll have a pretty pile years before
old age compels you to begin to draw
jit out. Talk it oyer with us any day!
CITIZENS' DOLLAR SAVINGS BANK
i lUJVlJ I &9
S^I- 'ER.
jving- household goods and
specialty.
! Bell ? Phone?Residence- 1>40 : Of|
iice. 8.
| Consolidated "Phone? Residence|
70. Office. 100.
-i '! .>5 >5 -_M ( ._>? ._*? ,?t ..'i Jjt
m ?e ! >? .?! .?? ._ ? jt ..?t ,.?e ._?t -jt
ji ?.
SE ,
!ST VIRGINIAN Si
IS THE
Points 01 sf
LENCE: ;*;*
A
^
qi is to "be Reliable ^ -u
ay. * *.
Lucb. on rumors; it *'*
A Ais
reading matter fc'fe^
A
A &
with its patrons; % A
ke. ^ %
leased wire tele- tt
A &
). i; A
home news than * *
rin Marion county.
7S in a readable, in- f f
entertaining- man- T *
sll-selected reading
L members of the ?'**
A /
/
,"not a "Knocker"; kfcome
a panic, nor
>ne soon. ^ i
LICAN in politics, f-'f
id or ashamed to * f
- - ii ,
;orial Page full of
sious and oleas- f" '?
? it*
k 1&
tte of tile feelings *? 'f
adeavors to "be fair ? ?
-Si Si
ubscriber, become t T '
a Si
Si Si
cents per week.. ~ '&V
cents per month. * *
5 for three months. '* '*
fr\y? o troo r* ^ ' / _**
& *
riers to all pa-rta ?
3 ?ity- . '
& jc sr *c ?" sr *f '? ' jp f *" *"
)C JO Jf *? fc" I? Si" *" J? ** *"

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