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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, July 08, 1904, Image 2

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' ~
SIGHTSEERS
OF
. crowd that gathers about ti
" the national democratic
headquarters in st. li
larly inte
ST. LOUIS, July 7.?The sightseers st
themselves are part of the sights of tt
the Democratic convention. This is
particularly true of the crowd that o!
gathers about the Jefferson hotel, e<
where the national committee has b:
its headquarters. The onlookers tc
throng the lobbies ana tne naimajs, j n:
and hundreds of them are apparent- i
ly too modest to come inside, for they h
stick to the sidewalks. Every wellknown
figure in the affairs of the parv,
ty who shows his nose is immediately
made the target of all eyes, and when g
some really prominent man comes r<
along he frequently has trouble in a
making his way through the here- u
worshippers, who crowd in on him. o
One of the noticeable things about ail tl
this is that many of the curious ones b
are Europeans, who are evidently 'I
combining a visit to the World's Fair i
with the opportunity to see politics r
as she is displayed in America. c
Vardaman's White Clothes. c
' The most striking figure in the c
crowds is Gov. Vardaman, of Missis- <sippi,
dressed in white clothes with
long black hair falling down over his c
collar. Wherever he went he was i
- taken for Bryan, and any number of "
J--'"-' wnnh nn tr\ him cx n rl hi 111 ' (
t. - ...nwi. ?
by that name. =
While he was standing in the Jeffer- , s
. son a-couple of strangers who sup- c
^posed him to be Bryan went up and ! f
asked the privilege of shaking his j t
hand, saying that they had voted for f
him. The Governor supposed that j j
they were Mississippians. and meant ; s
that they had voted for him for Gov- j i
ernor. |
"Who is your choice for President?" j c
"Parker," said Gov. Vardaman. ! ;
The jaws of the strangers fairly l
S dropped on their chests. They were :
just framing up a question which 1
would elucidate the mystery when
_ the Governor was claimed by somebody
"else. Then they went out and
spread the astonishing _ story that !
Bryan had come out for Parker, and ' 1
Sif ' the rumor traveled around the hotels 1 ]
for some time before it was run down, j j
Confederate Cabinet Survivor. ;
One of the most interesting charac- i ]
ters of the convention is Judge John i
: H. Reagan, of Palestine, one of the!
delegates-at-large from the State of;
Texas. He is S5 years old and is the j
sole survivor of Jefferson Davis' Cab- i
inet during the days of the Confederacy.
Among the other delegates from i
Texas he is referred to as the "Fath- i
er of Texas Democracy."
For 60 full years Judge Reagan has
been in public life, having been district
judge in Dallas county as early <
as 1S44. He was elected to Congress <
in 1S56, and at the formation of the
Confederate States he was named by ,
President Davis to be Postmaster
General in the Confederate Cabinet.
After the reconstruction period Reagan
again was elected district judge
and later returned to Congress.
He was elected United States Senator
in 1S90, but resigned two years
later to become chairman of the Texas
Railroad commission by appointment
of Governor Hogg. This posiffT"/
tion has neither financial nor political
returns, but Judge Reagan took it.
sacrificing his Senate seat, at the urgent
request of Governor Hogg and
other nartv leaders of Texas.
Swallow's Nephew at St. Louis.
"Oh, no; I shan't vote for Uncle Si.
I've got a reputation to keep out in
Nebraska. They'd think I had bats
in my belfry if I wasted a good Democratic
vote by voting for a Prohibition
President." The speaker was C.
\V. Swallow, of Humphrey, Neb.,
grandnephew of Rev. Silas C. Swallow,
who beat Gen. Miles at the Prohibition
National convention, and the
nephew's subsequent remarks indicated
that the Swallow family has a
few black sheep whose thirst is for
something stronger than cold water.
"There was always something funny
about uncle," continued Nephew
Swallow. "He never acted like an
ordinary boy when he was a youngster,
and when he grew up he was still
odder. Why, just think of it, he was
brought up in the good old Democratic j
faith, and here he tips and gets on the
/ Prohibition ticket for President. It's
. a nice thing, isn't it? We feel it keenly,
but as I tell the boys back home,
we can't help it. Uncle gets no votes
from us, though, for there are a few
in the family who like their water
with something in it."
Guffey on Gorman.
The delegates are chuckling over a
yarn attributed to Col. Guffey. The
delegates say that Col. Guffey is much
disgrusted with the backing and filling
and side-stepping of Arthur Pue Gorman,
of Maryland, and this is tiie
iRT I
; THE SIGHTS 5
it
HE JEFFERSON HOTEL, WHERE ;v
COMMITTEE HAS ITS
OUIS, IS PART1CUiRESTING.
i _
1
ory they say that the Colonel told j h
te other evening: t
."Senator Gorman makes me think j ti
: a calf I once owned. When I want- j
1 to ha\*e the critter drink I most i vad
to pull the ears out * to get her j h
> the trough and then when she had j P
runk as much as was good for her k
most had to pull her tail out to get er
away from the trough." 3
Tamrr.arty Toils Fierce Tale. j 1
i ne rammany ieasiers are ctn whrauilating
themselves that they e
cached St. Louis at all. Soon after
train on which some of them came
d town left Altoona the engineer
pened the throttle to make up a lit- 1
le lost time. The speed of the train 1
icreasetl rapidly, and just as the i
'ammany men were getting used to
t it took a sharp curve at a rate that 1
hreatened to throw their special car 1
ft the track. Leader Murphy, Repesentative
Cochran and half a dozen ^
others were thrown out of their seats I
Hid went careening to the other side
jf the car. 5
"The trucks on the left side of the
tar left the track and went ten feet
n the air," said Secretary Smith, of
rammany hall, in describing the in- :
nclent. "We all fell over to the other 1
;ide and for several minutes we felt 1
is though nothing could keep the car J
>n the track and us in the car. The i
loor of the car was at right angles to
he roadbed. Mr. Murphy was the ;
irst to recover his presence of mind. '
-le got up on his feet and looked '
iternly to the side of the car that had '
isen in the air. Then he said:
'Down, Rover, Down!" The car
>beyecl and returned gradually and I
;ently to the track. If ?.Ir. Murphy
ia<l not been there to give orders I
im sure some of us would not have '
ived to tell the story." !
Human Liberty Below Par.
John Wesley Gaines, of Tennessee,
.leld forth this morning in the hotel
lobbies on the subject of the Philiplines.
Mr. Gaines went to the Philippines
once and spent enough time
here to become the greatest living
authority 011 the islands and their
people. He knows almost as much
about the Philippines as Albert J.
Beveridge, of Indiana, knows about
Russia, Siberia. Manchuria and Asia.
Mr. Gaines is for the independence
pf the islands right away, and he
wants to have the question settled in
the Democratic convention without
bothering Congress about it at all.
Wherever he went to-day there could
be heard "oppression." "slavery,"
'despotism, urouen pledges, adoui
one group, to which Mr. Gaines was
discoursing, there hovered a man
with gray whiskers and inquisitive
eyes.
"Who is he?" asked an Oklahoma
delegate.
"Gaines, of Tennessee," said the
Boomer.
"What is he talking about?' asked
the stranger.
"Human liberty,", said the man
from the Territory.
"Oh, to hell with him," muttered
the stranger, and moved toward the
bar.
Sterrett on the Cartoon Habit.
Col. "Bill" Sterrett, of Dallas, the
great cosmopolitan from the Lone
Star State, appeared in town to-day.
He had no sooner taken his place in
the ranks of the statesmen in the Jefferson
lobby than a young man approached
him and said:
"Col. Sterrett, stand right here for
a moment and I will run and get a
cartoonist to make a picture of you."
"Now, ain't we a damn queer Nation?"
remarked the colonel. "When
we want to compliment a man. instead
of saying to him, 'Let us have
a ui mix wix iuc, ui .? ? c ivuuiiio i v.markably
well this morning,' or telling
him how much he reminds us of
the greatest man that ever lived, we
say: 'Here, you, stand still and I'll
run off and get a man to make you
look a damned sight worse than you
do, and then print it in the paper
where all of the people that don't like
you will see it.' It's a great country,
and the more I see of it, the greater
I think it is." The cartoonist arrived
at this moment and Col. Sterxett
submitted to the pencil -without
turning an eyelash.
A Raid on the Press Seats.
Representative Hitchcock, of Nebraska,
who has charge of the press
arrangements, reserved a hundred
seats for emergencies, and for the
country newspapers. Yesterday afternoon
the National committee got
together, and, after deliberating solemnly
upon the question, passed a
resolution appropriating to itself five
press seats for every member of the
committee. i
- ffr'- . _
When Mr. Hitchcock heart? of it
; got after the committee. This ?
kins of 250 seats left^ only 70 for
te newspaper men. He secured the
tiling of another meeting of the
immittee, at which the organization
eekly rescinded its action in obeience
to Hitchcock's behests. But
took away .113 100 extra seats,
hich he had been so carefully r.tirstg
for the country papers, and diided
them among its members.
Jones Out of Politics.
Ex-Senator James K. Jones, of Aransas.
said to-day that lie wound up
is career when he called the conven- ?
on to order. He said he would rere
permanently from politics.
Mr. Jones still say.s that Parker
'ill not he nominated, and that if
e is. the prospects of his election are
oor. The Parker men say t.iat this
? a good omen. They say that Jones
xed his status in the proper class for
ood and aii by his predictions of ?
democratic victory in 1S96, 1S98,
900, and 1902. and that in view of
,-har ho vavs about Parker the judge's
lection is certain. j _
The Human Megaphone. o
Judge Jefferson Pollard, of the St. ;
>ouis police court, is the principal j c
eauing clerk of this convention. He ?
s known throughout Missouri as the
'Human .Megaphone." Representaive
Champ Clark sings this testimolial
in his behalf: _
"His voice is weird, wonderful,
vitching. it is powerful as a "oasso
profunda, penetrating as Gabriel's
iilver trumpet and sweet as an aeo- i C
ian harp."
Music For Southerners.
The biggest explosion of enthusiasm
vsince the Democrats began to at*- _
rive occurred when the King's county
delegation's brass Ivand marched
into the lobby of the Southern piayng
"Maryland, My Maryland."
The Southern men shrieked, yelled. and
went crazy. Then the band playad
"Dixie," and the rebel yell rang
throughout the hotel from hundreds
af voices.
Alas, Poor Murphy!
Charles F. Murphy, although he has
been a district leader in Tammany j
hall for many years, and is now lead?r
of the organization, never before
attended a National convention.
"He can truthfully say that he has _
attencieu one IIUW, rtfmai ncM a. x c*?
ker delegate.
WALKS AND TALKS
By Julius Chambers In Pittsburg
Dispatch.
The pathetic feature of the St. Louis
convention is the obliteration of Mr. j I
Bryan. He is in some respects a wonderful
product of this country. Here
is a man who was in Congress for two
years and whom nobody remembered _
when he suddenly loomed up as the
star of the first magnitude at Chicago
on a very hot July day in 1S96. Without
doubt he was the strongest personality
in his party for more than
four years, although a twice defeated j
candidate for the Presidency. Everybody
who came under the influence
of his magnetism was won over to his friendship.
This fact renders the spectacle of
the hour all the more pathetic. We ]
have heard much of the ingratitude
of republics; what is to be said of
the ingratitude of parties? And yet.
history has repeated itself. The Hepublicans
turned their backs upon
Blaine. They forgot Arthur for Harrison.
Nevertheless the dethronement
of Bryan is a pathetic spectacle.
Now let him go to the Senate&tnd do
something.
There are two New York personalities
at St. Louis that may not appear
upon the surface, but they are much
larger men than others that will be
much in evidence. I refer to William
Sulzer and Elliot Danforth. Sulzer is
the readiest, cleverest talker in the
New York delegation. Bourke Cockran
has to prepare his speeches and
then memorize them, but Sulzer has
the ability to talk on his feet and has
ideas enough to supply the words.
Danforth is not a nature gifted orator,
but he is a good politician. Of
the two men it is a safe guess that
Congressman Sulzer will be Governor
of New York earliest if the Democratic
majorities come that way.
Representatives of the German steel
manufacturers in London, all of whom
are members of the German steel
trust, have agreed upon the opening
of a sales agency in London, from
which to control from there the steel
trade of the world.
....
FAIRMONT, W. VA.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
LAWYERS.
JOHN L. LEHMAN,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
JAS. A. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, B. A. Fleming Building.
A. O. STANLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, T. \V.? Fleming Building.
W. S. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law.
FAIRMONT, V. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
A. L. LEHMAN,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT,' W. Va.
Office, Hall Block;
C. H. LEEDS.
Attorney at Law,
T-> ? T -T> trAVT
r -aiiv-av.> x , ?? . ?*. ^ I
Office, Hall Block.
HARRY SHAW,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, \V. Ya.
iflice. Raymond bid?., Jefferson St.
E. M. SHOWALTER,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, \Y. Ya.
Office in W. A. Fleming Building.
T. N. PARKS,
Attorney at Law.
FAIRMONT, \V. Ya.
)fllce Main St.. Opposite Court-house.
A. 5. FLEMING,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Ya. ,
Office, 202 Main Street.
E. F. HARTLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT. W. Ya.
)Sce, First National Bank Building.
PHYSICIANS.
C. O. HENRY, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hail Block.
H. R. JOHNSON, M. D?
Practice Limited to the Eye, Ear, Nose
and Throat.
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office. Second Floor, Hall Block.
DR. L. B. BURK,
rreatment, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
OFFICE, 304 MAIN STREET.
Hours?12 to 3 P. M., 7 to 9 P. M.
Otherwise by Appointment.
JOHN R. COOK, M. D.,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office at Hospital.
DR. D. L. L. YOST,
Office 225 Jefferson Street.
Residence, new building, Fairmont are.
no v A. SELBY.
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office 123 Main Street.
W. C. & JESSE A. JAMISON.
Physicians and Surgeons,
FAIRMONT, W.-Va.
Office 306 Main Street.
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL,
F. W. Hill, M. D.?Corner of Quincy
and Jachson street. Office Hours:
10 A. M. to 12 M., 7 to 9 P. M.
DR. EUGENE W. LOMAX,
312 Main St., Fairmont, W. Va.
HOURS?S to' 11 A. M.; 2 to 5 P. M.;
3 to 9 P. M. Consolidated 'Phone 331.
LUC1AN N. YOST, M. D.,
Eclectic Physician and Surgeon.
City Office Over Mansbach's Store.
Hours?10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M.,
C to S P. M. Res. hours?7 to 9 A.
M., 12 to 2 P. M.(/ 5 to 6 P. M.
DENTISTS.
Dr. A. R. SADGLEY,
DENTIST: Vitalized Air Given for
Extraction if Desired. Prices Reasonable.
All Work Guaranteed.
' Dr. J. O. McNEELY,
DENTIST.
Main Street,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
DR. W. J. BOYDSTON,
Dental Surgeon.
Office, 107 Main street. Opposite
Postoffice.
L. G. ICE,
DENTIST.
Porcelain Work a Specialty.
Tost Building.
OPTICIANS.
A. O. & H. H. HEDGES,
Jewelers and Opticians,
329 Water Street.
Expert Watch and Optical Work.
Over 20 years' experience.
VETERINARIAN SUPvGEON.
DR. JAMES E, MAGEE,
"Veterinarian Surgeon and Dentist.
Office at Chilson & Ciaytor's Livery
Stable. Bell 'Phone 164 R.
JOSEPH SCHUSTER,
Contractor for Cement Sidewalks,
Cellar Floors, Yards, Retaining Walls
and Steps. Stable Floors and Cellars
made water tight, a specialty.
Residence?Spence street, near Maple
avenue. F. &. M. 'Phone, 534. P.
O. Box, 476. Fairmont, "W. Va.
REWARD
The undersigned, Fairmont and
Clarksburg Traction Company hereby
oSer a reward of
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS
for the apprehension and conviction
of the person or persons who placed
the rock upon the rail of the track belonging
to the Traction Company between
Fleming and Jayenn stations,
causing the front trucks of car Mo. la by
to leave the tracks. m<
FAIRMONT & CLARKSBURG po
TRACTION COMPANY. jf
By Smith Hood, sa
OUi-"=J lUlCIlUtilL. QO
BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD. ?
in
' th
NIGHT EXCURSION
TO ^
PITTSBURGIS
v.* j
cu
Round Trip S1.75. SATURDAY, July 9 in
Special train leaves Fairmont at 12:15 A. ^
M.. arriving Pittsburg 6:39 A. Al. co
cb
Special train leaves Pittsburg return- f'u
ing at 6:00 P. M. cIs
Your store is always a little too full
of the goods you have omitted to ad- m
vertise. H
S3? r** T I 1
w. a. in
TRAN?
Hauling of all kinds. Movi
pianos a sp
Residence, 319 Merchant street.
Office on Parks avenue, next to fi<
Skinner's Tavern, Fairmont, W.
Va. ~(
>! j! ,st je as ,t _?t
_?5 _** -Jt -J* J? Ct -_?S ,*t >f ,M Jt
^ TH1
ii FAIRMONT WES
Vi CLAIMS
ii Following P
- - F^f f
|r."
* 1. Its constant aim
v * and Trustworths
* * 2. It doesn't go mu
^ prefers Facts.
?, * 3. It classifies its
with care.
y y
v* v 4. It deals fairly ^
?. *> treating all alike
J J 5. It lias a full 1
*, * graphic service.
* 6. It gives more 1
v ^ any other paper:
r> 7. It puts the news
* r teresting and ei
^ner.
v y fi. Tf. fnrniRlifiS topII
*v> matter for all
I * family,
r r 9. It is a "Booster,'
it doesn't welco
v J does it expect on
rn 10. It is republ:
J and is not afraic
v r; say so.
nr. 11. It lias an Edito
timely discussi
nr. . .
? v antnes.
* r 12. It is considerat
* * of people and em
v v at all times.
n n if you are not a su
* one to-day.
n n Ten ce
55 TERMS! ?
n r $4.00
r r.
*, v Delivered by carri
n r of the
r n
^ ^ JP 8P ^ 4^ ^ Ji*
i V
HAMPERED
"lack of funds at the crucial moat
many a man has missed the op- i
rtunity to put himself beyond want,
not to make a fortune. Acquire the "
vin'g habit by putting your first ;j
liar or your first five or ten dollar
il in this bank for savings, let 'it "1
large through the four (4) per cent,
terest we pay and so be ready for
e first chance to make an even
gger income.
' ? ? ' ? a ra ? A \ , F (M /? o DnMtr J
t l^tito L/UL.i.nn ?
Dr. Wells, a London physician, in
is, in his published essay on dew,
is the first to draw attention to the
rious artificial production of ice in
dia. Shallow pits were dug, which
e partially filled with perfectly dry .
raw: on the straw broad, flat pans I
ntaining water are exposed to the )
ear sky. The water, being a power- |
1 radiant, sends off its heat abun;ntly
into space.
I have some good bargains on Falront
avenue. Call and see me. H. - |
. Lanham. x
ramr " 1
I V/l H II IW9
5FER.
ng household goods and
>ecialty.
Bell 'Phone?Residence, 340; Of:e,
3.
Consolidated 'Phone?Resiaenee> . |
>. Office, 100. J.
jt - < .jt _ ? ._?? .j? .js js js
Jt et
Ss. E
5t 'a
;T VIRGINIAN it
> THE *
onus ot tt
^ENCE:
St
<( i/V
is to be Reliable 5. ^
r- i &.
ch onrumors; it
& 9V
reading1 matter fe
fc'fc.
Sn Ss.
?p-ith its patrons; &
3. fc fc. '
eased wire tele- * ^
i. ?
lorne news than f ^
in Marion county. ^
i in a readable, in- 56 &
ltertaining man- ??
i. fc.
L-selected reading ^
members of the ^ ~f'
ji &
& i.
7 not a ".KnocKer"; ^
&
me a panic, nor ^
e soon. 5. t
[CAN in politics, f
i or ashamed to I* ^
St. St
rial Page full of
ons and pleas- ^ ^
St &
e of the feelings "* ^
deavors to be fair \ ^
bscriber, become '* ^
fc
mts per week.
cents per month. * '*
for three months. %
for a year. '*r*
St St
ers to all parts & fc
city. %<** '
?? Jp *' S? K* ?"* Sf SO JT SP JP aP
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