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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, July 29, 1904, Image 1

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I VOLUME I. FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA, FRIDAY. JI'LY 20, 1904. ~ NUMBER 88. '
MORE THAN SI
THOI
p ARE NOW AT WORK IN THE FAIR}
MONT REGION?THE AVERAGE
OUTPUT PER DAY IS ABOUT
SIX HUNDRED CARS.
&;
': Few people realize how many men
-with cap and lamp and pick go into
"the hills every day to bring out the
"dusky diamonds" for which this region
is so justly noted. To stand at
the station and see car after car go
by. gives one but a faint idea of what
is really going on these busy times in
'mining circles. The Fairmont Coal
'Company now has more than six thou;
-sand men on its pay roil who earn a
living for themselves and families by
^preparing cars of coal for market.
"The earnings of these six thousand.
. .-supply the needs of twelve or fifteen
thousand women and children. Thus
;an army of twenty thousand people
" is practically clothed and fed by the
actual work of bringing the coal from
the ground. These are only a few of
the people who directly and indirectly
-a.re benefited by the coal business in
the Fairmont region. Through the
3dndness of the Fairmont Coal Company
officials, we give to-day the number
of men at work at each of the
"mines in this vicinity. The detailed
'.list is as follows:
Pmnickinnick, 241; Fall Run. 99:
' "Dixie, 50; -TTwo Lick, 57; Interstate.
'74; O'Neill No. 1, 71; O'Neill No. 2,
l *; jt-ooz, xzo; x.,ucas, zs: ferry, zzu;
Coaling Station, 50; Beechwood, 93; :
Murray, 1S1; Montana, 301; Shaft,
;274; New England, 340; Gaston, 193; 1
Monongah, No. 2, 360; Monongah No.
-' 3, 365; Monongah No. 6, 174; Pennois,
194; Marion, 26; Anderson, 223; High- '
land, 142; Middleton, S9; Chiefton, '
118; Hutchinson, 110; Enterprise,
"215; Viropa, 100; Riverdale, 11S; '
"Ehten, 130; Solon, 114; Gypsy, 357; 1
Meadowbroolc, 100; Farnum, 73: Dun- 1
Ifaa-g), 146; Lynch, 2S; Revnoldsville, <
. 44; Columbia, 138; Ocean, 171, making <
a total of 6,006. 1
It will be seen that the company i
is now operating forty mines, and they s
rare all busy- as can be supplying the t
-great demand now on for Fairmont I
-coal. v t
HORSESHOT j
r
-CONSIDERABLE COMMENT AND r
CONFLICTING REPORTS d
CAUSE SOME EXCITE- t
MENT IN THE FIFTH ' s
WARD. 0
1
Last evening a horse belonging to s
-Chas. McCray was shot while in a pas- 0
ture field near J3ell run station on the (]
Monongah line. Some very damaging t
reports were at first current con- ?
cerning the affair, but it is likely the
facts were exaggerated. Three hoys
were near the horse with a gun. and ^
they claim, they were shooting at birds. t.
Whether they shot the horse or not. the t]
horse lias a bullet hole in his side and v
he may die. When it was found out n
the horse was shot it created considerable
excitement.
A veterinary surgeon was called
and probed for the ball, tracing it
from its entrance into the bowels a'
short distance in front of the flank. v
The ball was not found but it went
forward toward tlie lungs. The heavy
breathing of the horse appeared to
Indicate that the hall had entered the
lungs. The horse suffered a great deal
from the effects of the ball. The hall sf
was shot from a No. 22 cartridge.
This procedure bears its note of o1
warning. If boys do not know the
use of guns and-do not realize the p!
danger lurking in leaden balls, they
o.uwuiu i? i. v*2 aiiuweu i_?uc iipu^n cxic;
public highway with such weapons. %v
SAME FATE ?
"WHICH OVERTOOK THE RUSSIAN fe
MINISTER AWAITS HIS SUC- Cl
CESSOR, UNDER CERTAIN
CONDITIONS. m
C(
ST. PETERSBURG. .Tilly 99 ?The '}*
man who was arrested yesterday for '
exploding the bomb which killed the
minister of the interior as he was
driving to the Baltic station, still do- A
_ dines to give his name or to tell anything
about himself. His only statement
is:
"I have performed an act of justice
for which I shall have glory: I have
no accomplices, but if the government S:
perseveres in the same policy sp
Plehve's successor will meet the same tr;
fate as Plehve and his predecessor." ur
We are lower than the lowest In
.prices on Artie and "White Mountain w:
freezers. J. L. Hall's hardware store, x ht
MM! '!,
[X
JSAND MINERS
PITTSBURG
LEADS THE
COUNTRY
IN MARKED CONDITIONS OF IMPROVEMENT
? IRON AND
STEEL TRADE IS GOOD.
I
CURRENT ACTIVITY IN VARIOUS
PARTS OF THE COUNTRY
BETTER THAN LAST YEAR.
NEW YORK. July 29.?The advices
received this week from special agents
of the International Mercantile Agency
at the leading trade centers of the
country are, in the main, satisfactory.
The spirit of optimism is growing and
confidence is good: fall and winter
business increases from week to week.
Current activity in the different Industrial
lin/ic !? n<-?f for-t- rrrpor nitr pan ii
as come about in me iron anu steel
rade. New mills have been opened,
hough just how far the management
ere justified in taking this stop is '
ot altogether certain.
NAME
i
/AS SAID TO BE OBJECTIONABLE '
TO PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT ,
BECAUSE OF AN EDITORIAL.
JACKSON. Miss., July 20.?A sen- '
itioii has been caused by the govern- (
lent's refusal to allow a new post- .
Tice in Chickasaw county to be t
lined Vardaman in honor of the f
-esent governor of Mississippi.
The petition was delayed for an 1111iual
length of time and finally word
as sent back that the office would
tt be established, with the, intima- r
on that the name was objectionable. 1
It is believed the petition was re- '
rred to President Roosevelt, togeth
with a clipping from one of the ed- I
orial utterances of Governor Varda- |
an, while editor of the Greenwood
ammonwealth, in which he made a
srespectful criticism of President
oosevelt's mother. -j
ONLY S4.00 TO WASHINGTON
\
nd Return?Only $4.50 to Baltimore
and Return, Saturday Night, August
20, via Baltimore & o
Ohio Railroad. F
r h
Train No. 4 will leave Fairmont at t:
3S A. M., affording an opportunity to J
end all day Sunday among the at- h
actions of either the Capital or Mon- c
nental City. v
We are giving 10 per cent, off on c
iter coolers and filters. X L. Hall's _
irdware store. ^ X- .
ifiMI i ~ i
be expected to be at this season of the
year. It is, however, better than it
was a year ago.
There has been good growing weather
for the crops, which are approaching
harvest under continued improved
conditions. In the spring wheat
sections of the northwest some rust
has been discovered which will reduce
the yield. Harvesting is in progress
in nearly all of the leading winter
wheat States and the results are better
than farmers thought they would
be two weeks ago.
The returns on wheat in the southwest
have stimulated business in that
part of the country where merchants
-eport the number of value of their
prders to be ahead of those of 1903.
Collections in the St. Louis district
lave far exceeded those of last year,
"all orders being high. Boots and
;koes have been in good demand,
hough clothing is slow. Dallas retorts
bright trade prospects based on
he favoring conditions for the growng
crops.
The first symptom of discouragenent
that has been showd at Kansas
City are apparent this week in retorts
of a slack condition of trade in
nost lines, with the volume of orders
tot equal to last year, and country
lealers showing caution in placing
heir business. Chicago retailers are
aid to be more pessimistic than they
night to be in view of actual events,
'lie packing house strike casts a
hadow over trade there. Xndianaplis
indicates some improvement in
rygoods and shows with hardware
hat it. is behind last year. The most
ratifying trade statements of all are
liose from Pittsburg.
This is due to the improvement that
THE POLITICAL CYF
'. W.jv,^; sBsawsBCTHas
; ^b
?fA\T5T Pf\
WUiV I uu
TO PEST
HOUSE
PEOPLE OF JACKSON STREET E
ARE VERY MUCH IN EARNEST
OVER THE SMALLPOX
SITUATION.
THE HOWARD FAMILY REFUSES
TO GO TO THE PEST HOUSE 1
AND BROKE THE QUAR- >
ANTINE.
s
We hear that, the Howard family on i
Jackson street has refused to go to e
the pest house near the Fair grounds, f
That is the privilege the members it
have. But the house in which the v
family now lives is supposed to be under
strict quarantine because of the c
case of smallpox therein. Last even- n
ing one of the young men of the
place walked out of the house and 1<
went up Jackson' street. After about tl
an hour he returned and it is thought
he was out inspecting the pest house.
Now. we would like to know why this S
man was allowed to leave the quaran- V
tined house. Half a dozen people u
living on Jackson street saw him ti
leave and return. To the people of
this city, and especially to those liv- at
ing near the afflicted family, it is a ct
serious matter. Some one is to blame, in
He should be punished. We sympathize
with the afflicted family. It is rc
hard for them to be penned up but ai
the rest of the people must be nro- t!
tected. Thc-re are no screens in the Is
windows and no doubt hundreds of ci
flies so into the sick room and then to al
l he neighboring houses. Is there not
some danger that the disease will
spread if conditions remain as at
present? If this were during cold
weather, surely a great many people
in this city would become afflicted B
with the disease. It is the right of
die citizens, especially those aiong
Jackson street, to he protected from
his contagion, and the laws should
ye enforced before wo have an epilemic
of smallpox. If it does not n?
spread, it surely will not be because er
tf the fake quarantine. Now the
writer does not know who is to blame a'or
what lias already been done, but m
t is surely time some steps should be Es
aken to prevent the spread of the W!
lisease. "c
PORT ARTHUR AGAIN. j
an
ROME, July 29.?A rumor is cur- ])Q
ent here this evening that Port Ar- .
:hur has fallen. There is no confirma- Sp
:ion obtainable. j{
as ini
rAKKtlf WILL
BE SILENT"
4
"H ROUGH OUT THE CAMPAIGN,
AFTER HE SENDS HIS LET|
TER OF ACCEPTANCE.
Esopus, July 20.?Mayor McClellan,
f New York, is an expected visitor at ;
iosemont to-day, though the hour of
is arrival is unknown to his prospecive
host and until this morning, ^
udge Parker had no intimation that
e intended calling to-day. He will
ome aboard the steam yacht Saphlre,
dth John McDonald, the New York wll
ontractor, upon the invitation ex- c"^t
snded several weeks ago. " It is an(
-.(Continued on Eighth Page.) tha
?ANO DE BERGERAC.
w.
?Washington Post.
PEOPLE
WE ALL
KNOW
3RIEF SKETCHES OF THE POPULAR
EMPLOYES OF LOCAL
STREET RAILWAY COMPANY.
L. J. Walker will ljave been in the
rraction Company's employ two
ears on August 22d.
Walker came to Fairmont about
even years ago from Toll Gate.
Aichie county, at which place he was
mployed as a painter and which proession
he followed for several years
l this city, previous to his service
,"ith the company lie now serves.
He is the oldest motorman on the
ity lines and stands first for a Moongali
run.
Walker is a quiet unassuming feljw.
and has ail excellent record with
le company.
A. C. Michael.
A. C. Michael has been with the
itreet Railway Company over one
ear, but has made himself very poplar
by his many kindnesses to pa ons
of the line.
His home was formerly in Fairview,
ad he is one of the few men in this
aunty who saw real active service
i the late war with Spain.
Michael enlisted in the 14th XI. S.
igular infantry when quite young,
id participated in quite a few bates
and skirmishes in the Philippine
lands, and on the way to and fro,
rcled nearly the entire globe, and
1 before reaching the age of twenty.
TWO MEN SHOT
Y A COLORED WORKER WHEN
ATTACKED BY THEM ? HE
OUKt f\ f'ULHit
COMMISSION.
KANSAS CITY. July 2a.?Pat l.a- .
:sta and Matt Sullivan, union striks,'
who, with a crowd of associates,
fered violence to L. King, colored,
. King was going to work at Arour's
to-day. were shot down by him.
ich was wounded in the leg. King
is arrested. He bears a special po:e
officer's commission.
George Kaulovitch, accused of beg
a member of the attacking party, ,
d John Nicholson, who resisted the
lice, also were arrested. The en- :
e force of No. 2 police station re- ;
ondod to a riot call, and after con- i
ierable difficulty succeeded in restor- ]
g comparative order.
Many packing house employes on
eir way to work were molested this
rrning. An uneasy feeling prevails.
: '
THE WEATHER.
Good On Base Ball.
]
WASHINGTON, D. C., July '
29.?Forecast for West Vir- 1
ginia: Fair to-night and Sat- i
urday. <
<$> 1
1
Big Bell Has Arrived. E
rhe big six hundred dollar bell 1
ich was presented to-the Catholic v
irch by James Bennett has arrived 1
1 is being placed in the cupolo of f
t church.
GETTING TOG
FIRS
OUTLOOK
BETTER
TO-DA\
THERE ARE SOME SIGNS OF SET
TLEMENT OF THE BIG STRIKE
AT CHICAGO.
CHICAGO. July 29.?The fifth da;
of the big cattle strike began will
prospects of a possible settlement
Representatives of the stock men o
the West, who are heavy loser:
through the strike, appealed to thi
unions last night. President Donnel
lv met them and said:
We are willing to withdraw otn
previous proposition that all butchei
workers and casing workers shall be
reinstated within IS hours. We wani
a stipulated time for their reinstate
ment which can be arranged satisfactorily
if the packers are willing tc
meet us. The time for the other employes
to return to work can also be
ill i UUlii'll.
T.he cattle men's representatives,
A. L. Ames, of Buckingham. Iowa, and
H. C. Wallace, of Des Moines, officers
of the Corn Belt Meat Producers' Association,
will attempt to arrange a
conference.
The warlike feature of the day came
from the freight handlers'union. They
claim they will go out If the strike Is
not settled. They even assert that if
necessary to win, they will not only
refuse to handle non-union meat, but
will call out all the railway employes
and teamsters and tie up the entire
city. Such a strike would not add to
the packers' troubles, but would entail
serious discomfort and suffering
upon the general public. The
freight handlers argue that such a
condition would arouse the people to
wrath and might be a factor in forcing
a settlement.
A Turn In Affairs.
That the police really are in earnest
to suppress even the semblance
of interference with men at work in
the yards or the conduct of the packers'
business was demonstrated this
morning when George P. Golden, president
of the packing teamsters' union
was arrested by Police Inspector Hunt
on .an open charge of intimidation.
J. T. Buser, another alleged picket,
also was placed In custody. The labor
people claifn this is a movement to
disrupt the strikers' organization,
placing the leaders in a position where
they will be unable to direct their
men.
Bail was refused Golden when he
was taken to the stockyards police station
after it had been found that the
police court for the district had adjourned
its morning session. Golden
presented a bondsman who scheduled
property, hut Police Captpin Clancy
declined to accept, and ordered the
strike leader taken below and locked
up, claiming he had the right to hold
him for 24 hours without bail. Goldeft
raised a strong objection to his
incarceration, but he was hustled down
stairs despite his protests. The circumstances
of liis arrest were not particularly
strenuous. While telephoning
at labor headquarters, he noticed
li uuLtnei- a wagon going oy wiui a
heavy load and driven by a union man.
Golden stopped the team and asked
its destination and nature of the load.
The teamster informed him it consisted
of "chucks" for A. C. Cherry, who
has a market next to a branch of
Swift's, and Golden, suspecting the
meat was designed for the latter place,
ordered the man to turn back with the
load. At that Inspector Hunt, who
was nearby, promptly placed Golden
under arrest. The labor leader fought
strenuously at the police station when
it became apparent that he was to be
imprisoned, it requiring two officers to
Irag him into the cell.
Cornelius P. Shea, president of the
International Teamsters' Union, and
23 members of the allied trades who
met to consider the question whether
:.he stock handlers shall continue to
:ake care of livestock of the big packng
houses, adjourned their meeting
apon hearing of Golden's airrest, and
vent in a body to the-, stock yards
jolice station. Inspector Hunt was
;ent for and a heated colloquy folowed,
the inspector being charged
vlth importing the "Colorado idea"
ato' the stockyards strike. Shea de- <
canded that Himt book Golden, thus -j
(Continued From Fifth,|
ETHER IN
T CLASS SHAPE
" ' .
! ASE THE REPUBLICANS AT THE
STATE CAPITAL?DEMOCRATS , i
ARE STILL SCHEMING
AS OF OLD.
CHARLESTON.'\\\" Vs., July 29." After
a spirited debate the House |
to-day adopted a resolution limiting "
J speeches to ten minutes and proceed- ' 'j
' o::l to pass a mlinbcr oi bills to second
and third reading. s .
The constitutional- amendment resolution
is still the bone of contention.
The Democratic- side Is lined up solidly
against it. The House has referred
it to a special committee, consi-.!
int. of Reynolds. Schilling and
Kennedy to report back this evening.
- The Senate is still debating the
1 resolution on the floor.
Republicans are standing together, , !
1 and the prospect of getting the work
' done at an early date is growing
The Democrats have practically ex- K i.Vfl
hausted their resources and do not
1 expect to accomplish much. The State
committee will designate the executive
committee probably to-night. The , '!
committee' is harmonious and is get-, ; 1 '!y
ting things in shape for a hustling campaign
and 06,000 majority, as Elkins .''in y
The Republican State Central Com- '*33
mittee met at S o'clock last night in
the governor's reception room. Elliott
Northcott was elected chairman.
The question of where headquarters .
should be located was discussed at
length. Dr. IV. IV. Monroe, of Parfccrslmrg.
made an earnest plea for
Packersburg. and guaranteed that the
Business Men's League would furnish
free of cost, headquarters for the com
raittee, during the campaign. The
proposition was accepted and Parkersburg
was selected.
Democrats Go On Record.
The prophecy ot the , Democratic
press that the special session would
result in disaster to the Republican
party, has come to naught. :
The forebodings of some of the timid
Republican leaders that trouble would
surely follow has been dissipated.
To-day's session of the legislature
and the conference of the Republican
members held this afternoon, has re- suited
in a stand-together policy dfctd , /
the adoption of an agreement to pass
the bills recommended by the Parkersburg
committee, as amended, as speedily
as possible.
The day of the croker is over. The
Republicans have got together as : =;:'; '
never before in the history of the party
and the goose hangs high. Ten"
o'clock Friday morning has been set
as the latest time to make amendments
to the proposed Parkersburg
committee measures. From that time
these bills as amended (Will be pushed
through and passed by the united Republican
majority in the Legislature
as quick as It can possibly be done, :
The only uncertainty as to the outcome
of the recommendations of the
Parkersburg comfnittee will be the
adoption of the constitutional amend- v'v
ment. Lf this is defeated it will be
by the Democratic members composing
this legislative session. The Republican
representation in the house
lack two votes of the necessary number
required to present the constitutional
amendment to the people. Un- '
less the Democratic members unite
with their Republican brethren in.
passing this amendment, it will be de- 1111
feated through the failure -of st cur- i
ing the necessary two,-thirds vote in
the House to pass it.
in other words it is up to the Demo- ;,''t
cratic members in this special session
to pass or kill this constitutional
amendment that will entirely remove
all direct Slate taxes. In the e-vent of
the Democrats killing it in its passage, - . |tp
only two-thirds of the tax will be done 'V
away with, and the.remaining one-third !
will still remain as a burden to tax .
payers of West Virginia. The responsibility
of the State tax will rest en- <- >j
tirely upon the shoulders of the Democratic
party. ^ .V
The Republican members have made iH
every human effort to secure the
adoption of this amendment to do' . JB
away with all State taxes, but without
the assistance of the Democratic JU
members their hands are tied. Wheth- .mM
er the Democratic members will rise^HH
olinun f l-inii- not>hr o n rl o of in . f'ha
UDOTC men pwrrj uuu uk/i. iu?i.mest
o? the tax payers of the State jBH
mains as yet to be seen, but the^H
pression prevails that this will njJm
the case, but they will not rendw?8
assistance necessary to pas?H^^5J
amendment. .. V.i?
Little Frank Pinned D?|
Frank, the twelve weeks^H
>f Mr. and IMrs. Will I'innofr:
evening of cholerk infaraBffiKHHHSHSHSffiH
einains were taken to/
ifternoon for intermm

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