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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, August 12, 1904, Image 4

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THE FAIRMONT WEST VIRGINIAN.
PUBLISHES DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY
BY THE
Fairmont West Virginian Publishing
Company.
--- ' : - ? - ?
OBORC1E M. JACOBS, President.
LAMAR C. POWELL, Managing Editor,
rilji AL C. LOLQH, City Editor.
^ ? J. B. POWELL, Business Manager.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION:
Daily, one yearn $4 00
Daily, six months 2 00
Daily, three months 1 00
Weekly, one year 1 00
"Weekly, six months 50
Tiie west- Virginian, Daily and
Weekly, Is entered in the PostofHce at
Fairmont, W. Va., as second-class mail
matter.
REPUBLICAN TICKET.
: v
For President,
THEODORE ROOSEVELT,
of New York.
For Vice President,
illlS' CHARLES WARREN FAIRBANKS,
of Indiana.
trwi uw?ciiiwi,
_ william m. o. daws on,
of Kanawha count v.
For
Secretary of State,
iV CHARLES W. SWISHER.
7 ',; / of Marion county.
v'r . For Auditor,
ARNOLD C. SCHERR,
of Mineral county.
For Treasurer, i
V 7; J. NEWTON OGDIN. , 1
of Pleasants county. '
For Attorney General, '
CLARK W. MAY, s
of Lincoln county. 1
'
For Superintendent of Free Schools, s
THOMAS C. MILLER, :
of Marion county. 1 1
For Judges of Supreme Court, >
FRANK COX, <
of Monongalia county. 1
? <
JOSEPH M. SANDERS, s
! of Mercer county. t
t
; For Congress, r
; ] B. B. DOVENER, j
of Ohio county.
For State Senator, I
JOSEPH H. McDERMOTT, t
j of Monongalia county. i
c
For Judge of Circuit Court, d
JOHN W. MASON. c
; t
For House of Delegates, c
JAMES B. FOX, n
? a
THOS. W. FLEMING, v
E
. LAMAR C. POWELL. S
c
For Sheriff, \
HOWARD R. FURBEE. a
For Prosecuting Attorney, c
HARRY SHAW. h
t
>
For County Commissioner, S
C. P. MOORE. c
c
For County Surveyor, i
L. H. WILCOX.
For Assessor?Eastern District, t
GILBERT HOLMAN. c
r
For Assessor?Western District, v
A. J. McDANIEL.
J: ? C
.Tudere Parker can assign no better i
reason why he should be elected Pres- c
dent than that he will endeavor, God r:
helping him, to maintain what the t
Republicans have fought to secure t
and against which he has voted every
time opportunity has presented a
itself?the gold standard. g
? ti
The Democrats of West Virginia s
. are making their final grand stand n
play this year. They will not again, a
in many years, have a candidate for C
Vice President to use for bluffing pur- tl
poses, consequently, after the defeat
of this time, they will be crushed completely
and abandon all hope of ever ?
nMin frainini* the nsrendenev b
David B. Hill in 1S94, rhen United '5
States Senator from New York, in a
. , Ispeech in the Senate, said: "No PresY
- ident can be above his party; no
President can change his party's
^-platform." Therefore Judge Parker
' Xcannot change his party's platform,
Which ignores the gold standard. Ah,
" ^hat a tangled web we weave, when
firstIwe, practice to deceive."?Wheel- a
'' ing intelligencer. \ - n
A
r '' : ~ ~~
WEST VIRGINIA DOU8TFUL.
THere is a feeling nowhere in West
"Virginia, but among some few people
outside of the State, that on account
of the -candidacy, of Henry G. Davis
it will go Democratic. If such people
knew Mr. Davis as West Virginians
know him they would at once change
their minds. There is not nor never
was anything brilliant about him, and
why any Republican would want to go
out of his way to vote for the ordinary
old man is something we cannot understand.
Some of Mr. Davis' Republican
neighbors may compliment him
with their votes?may do so for personal
reasons alone?but his ability
and fitness for the Vice Presidency
will not attract any one to his support.
We doubt if be will receive the
full support of his party, because
many Democrats know that his great
age as well as lack of ability make
hint unfit for the high office for which
he has been nominated. What we
have said above was prompted by the
recent remark of the Pittsburg Disnnr
Strife i? rlnniilfill cm OC
count of Davis' 'candidacy. The Morgantown
Post .replied to this, giving
the best of reasons for believing, as
we do, that. West Virginia will remain
in the Republican column by a substantial
majority. The Post said:
"The Dispatch is in error, however,
in saying that West Virginia is a
doubtful State. It is as certain to
vote for Roosevelt as Ohio or Illinois.
A great part of West Virginia's population
has faith in (he ability of Theodore
Roosevelt to do the right thing
at the right, time. They have felt the
effect of his administration for three
years and are well satisfied to let
him continue for another term. There
is too much at. stake now. according
to the Republican view here, to permit
of experiments.
"If Roosevelt is elected millions of
capital will be invested in West Virginia
railroads, coal and timber lands,
in coke production, and in many
forms of manufactures. The State is
now third in quantity of coal produced,
and with greater railroad facilities
will take rank second only to
Donnc,.lT.9n^ T'no W.U'.Uno- ^ f ll.npD
new roads and the extension of
branches to the older roads, with the
opening of the coal and timber lands
lepend upon favorable financial coalitions
and public confidence in the
stability of the policy pursued by the
Republican party in relation to the
ariff, the currency and the banking
system. The business interests are
nenaced and intimidated by the mere
possibility of a change in these policies
by Democratic success. No busiless
man wants a change. Conditions
cannot be improved, and will certainy
be made less favorable by Democratic
success. This is well understood
by ever>r thoughtful voter in
his State, and that is why West "Virginia
is not doubtful, and can be conidently
counted to vote by 25,000 maority
for Roosevelt and Fairbanks."
TTncle Henrv CI. Davis, savs the
'arlsersburg State Journal, started
he white man's government idea roll- ,
ng along in West Virginia and now ,
an not stop it. It plagues him every .
lay and annoys the Northern Demorats,
but Uncle Henry might as well
ry to close up Niagara Falls with a ,
ake of chewing gum as to shut the
notiths of such men as George Byrne ,
nd Jaclc Alderson on this subject i
rith gentle protestation. One of the ,
nost sensible utterances, adds the ,
itate Journal, we have noticed in
onnection with the question in West
Virginia, is in the Parkersburg News,
.s follows":
"Every other Democrat one meets
in the highways and in the byways
tas a different oninion as to the nar
y's position on the negro question.
Seeing the harm that the party has
lone to itself in West Virginia and
)ther Northern States, they are tryng
to smooth the matter over and
get by' as. easily as possible.
"There is only one position that ]
he Democratic party has on the nejro
issue: It is everlastingly and eterlally
opposed to the negro having a
*ote, a free school, a church or any- ;
hing else that might tend to edu- '
ate and civilize him. Their position ]
s the result of passion and prejudice
arried to a frenzy that, does them
ore harm individually and collectively
than it does the members of j
he race at which it is aimed.
"The nesro question is a question, ,
s the incoming hordes of immi- t
rants is a political problem. But <
he negro question must and will be
ettled by patriotic American states- <
tansliip and not by 'bloody hands i
nil bullets.' as George Byrne, the ,
harleston radical, would have it set- f
ed." 5
Come to think of it, four years
f the Presidency would look like a
ig thing and really enough, to a man
s far away from it as Judge Parker '
A want advertisement, in these colmns,
"canvasses the city" with your
roposition; and if no returns come ^
3 you, there is something wrong ^
ith your proposition.
s
Refrigerators, new and modern, at b
ctual cost, by H. F. Leonard. "We 1
eed more room. x p
' how we are judged.
A man is judged by the company
| he keeps; it is the same way witl
States. West Virginia has been go
ing in the very best society, polit
icaiiy speaking, for the past ten years
and this talk about our going back tc
our non-progressive associations is
really embarrassing Let us reasbri
a little .together. Take the States
which are conceded to be' surely Dern
ocratic and those which are safely
Republican. Not a single State north
of Mason and Dixon's line is counted
as certainly Democratic, merely the
"Solid South" .and no more. What a
galaxy of Stares is conceded to be in
the Republican column?Ohio, Pennsylvania,
California, Kansas, Iotva,
Michigan, Minnesota, the Northwestern
and New England States and others,
all of which keep abreast of the
times in progress and development.
If the voters in West Virginia realise
what it means to keep in line with
the magnificent States just named,
this year will be the last that the
State will have to endure the opprobrium
of being doubtful, with the in
ference that we shall again join ourselves
to ihe "Solid South."
A !_iar That Deserves Hanging.
Parkersburg owes it to herself as
well as to the public generally to rid
herself oi 'he fiendish newspaper
ghouls who send out. fakes from there.
The matter has gone so far that, little
credence is given anything appearing
in outside papers under a Parkersburg
date line. As long as these fakirs
confine themselves to harmless
snake stories and the like nobody
cares so much, but when it comes
to fiendishly misrepresenting the
words pronounced by one of the city's
prominent ministers over the dead
body of one of her respected citizens
and thereby injuring the tender feeling
of bereaved ones it is time to call
a halt.?.Moundsville Herald.
.The above accounts for the Whitaker
story which emanated from the
said city of newspaper liars?with
apologies to the News and State
Journal, they never send out anything
but gospel truth. It keeps the
West Virginian busy trying to hold up
Fairmont's good name, for everything
the Parkersburg liar sends out is
given greater impetus by some of his
friends here.
When the Republican nominee for
governor. Mr. Dawson, returned to his
home from the Wheeling convention,
ten thousand of the populace of j
Charleston, without regard to polit- i
ical convictions, turned out and ten
dered him a rousing non-partisan re- ;
ception. In his address to his friends j
and neighbors political discussion ;
was entirely eschewed and the affair i
was rendered most enjoyable by rea- j
son thereof. Monday night half a j
rhousancl of Charleston people and ;
visitors turned out to greet candidate j
Cornwell. More than half of the mim- j
ber were Republicans who wanted to j
show a proper spirit on the part of j
the citizens. In the introductory j
speech of W. E. Chilton, in the ad- |
dress ?>f Candidate Cornwell and in
all the speeches which followed all
the speakers dealt in the most extravagant
abuse possible for words to
express of the Republican party. There
was cpneral remark that wnar was I
otherwise a pleasing reception had
been marred by the intemperate discussions
which followed.?Charleston
Mail.
Aged Lady Dead.
M;ss Gilley S. Stillwell, aged
eighty-two years and one month, died
last night at twelve o'clock at the
home of her nephew, O. S. Irvin. on
Maple avenue. Miss Stillwell had
been suffering from a stroke of paralysis
for the last two. years. She
bad been a consistent member of the
M. E. church from her childhood up
and when the end came' she met it
peaceably. The funeral services will
occur at three o'clock to-morrow afternoon,
Rev. George D. Smith, officiating.
Her body will be interred
in Woodlawn cemeterv. Undertaker
R. L. Cunningham in charge of remains.
Who Struck Billy Patterson?
The dispatch which we publish sayng
that N. E. AVhitaker, of Wheelng,
will support Cornwell is the hardest
blow yet dealt the Republican ,
nacliine in this State.?Parltersburg ,
Sentinel.
Wait until the blow has been dealt? ,
senator TYhitaker has not been in the
L'nited States since Corn well's norai- i
ration, so why place any faith in this
spurious report? ? Wheeling Tele- 1
;raph. ;
1
IMPROVEMENTS
Lock No. 15 at Hoult Being
]
Made.
The government has a force of 15
carpenters at work at Lock No. 15. i
~hey are building another dwelling, 1
vhich will be occupied by the assist- i
:nt lock tender. An office, black- i
mith shop and the necessary out t
uildings are also being erected, c
"ffiese buildings will be quite an im- 1
rovement. - i
An Appeal to the Record.
The history of financial legislate,
tion in America can be; summarised
s into the very brief statement that the
- Republicans have advocated and the
-- Democrats opposed every act of Iegis:
, lation calculated to perfect the sys)
| tea which now- obtains The conseni
stis of mature Republican judgment
t has been right. The consensus of
> opinion of the Democratic party has
- been wrong usually. The Republi
can party has made mistakes and
i rectified them. The Democratic par!
ty has made - mistakes and insisted
upon repeating them.
The National banking act was a
Republican measure, calculated to redeem
the country from the evils of
wildcat banking. The measure was
opposed by SO per cent, of the Democrats
in Congress and is to-day opposed
by a very large number of
them, in spite of the time test of its
merits. In "1SS0 the Democratic platform
declared the issue of National
bank notes unconstitutional and so
recently as 1000 the platform demanded
the substitution of Government.
notes or silver certificates for
ban): notes as rapidly as possible.
Every Republican in Congress
voted for the resumption of specie
payments and every Democrat, against
it; and a Democratic House, in 1S77.
passed a bill for the repeal of the resumption
act. A majority of the
Democrats* voted against the bill to
repeal the silver purchase act, and.
only 12 Democrats voted for the establishment
of the gold standard,
while 17S voted against it. The Republicans
in 1SSG and 1900 and 1904
declared for the gold standard, in
their party platforms. The Democrats
declared for the free and unlimited
coinage of silver in 1S96 and in 1900,
and remained silent on the subject in
their platform of 1904.
That, in brief, is the record and yet "
the Democratic party comes up and
asks the voters of the country to intrust
the desrinies of the Nation to
its unsafe hands and its uncertain ,
policies on a question that concerns
the welfare of every American. It is
like asking the owners of a vessel,
freighted with valuable cargo.
! steaming strong in a known current
I with a trained pilot, to surrender it
' to an unskilled pilot and untried
crew.
it appears that C. E. Mauley has
abandoned the idea of running for
sheriff, as certain Democrats, who C
are supposed to be friends of his, ar^e
at work on another slate. For the
two most important offices?sheriff
and prosecuting attorney?(Jlem L.
Shaver and Scott. C. Lowe, have been respectively
agreed upon. The former
has been in training for some
time for prosecuting attorney, and it
was a surprise to many when it was ?
learned that he had been switched to
a different place. It is not known
that Mr. Lowe has been looking for
any position, most persons believing
that he is fully aware of what is in ~
store for the Marion Democracy in
the coming month of November. The
latest movement indicates that about' ^
all of the Democratis know what is go- _
ing to happen this year, and that
therefore they have decided to nominate
any kind of a ticket, and make
a bluff with the object simply of
keeping up an organization. DEATH
c
ATTRIBUTED TO INVETERATE
SMOKING?A VERY VALUABLE
MAN IN MINERS' ORGANIZATION
DEAD.
CUMBERLAND. Aug. 12.?James ?
Zelinskitlie, National organizer of
;he U. M. W. of A., who has been assisting
in the management of the
strike in the Meyersdale field since
it started in December, dropped dead
yesterday. He was an inveterate
smoker of cigarettes, rarely being T
without a lighted one in his mouth,
and the doctors attribute his death
to this habit. He was considered one
of the most valuable men in the ?
miners' organization.
3. E. Fletcher Dead.
Mr. B. E. Fletcher, a popular and
highly respected citizen, died last
night of Bright's disease at his late R
residence near Thoburn, this county. ~~
Mr. Fletcher was sixty-four years
of age and was a consistent member
of the Baptist church of Thoburn.
He leaves a wife and three children
to mourn their loss, namely,
Richard Fletcher, of this city, Mrs.
Cleorge Nichols and Mrs. Lee L. Door.
Funeral services will be held at
his late residence Saturday morning p
rt 10 o'clock, and will be conducted
oy Rev. G. W. Kinsey, of this city.
His remains will be taken to Davis ?
Ridge cemetery for burial. Underalcer
Cunningham has charge of the
-emains. ^
6
Lawn Fete.
Don't forget the lawn fete this
sveunici <x l tue nume UL l>xr. mollis g
vneisel, No. SOS Fourth Street, Fifth
yard, hours from 7 to 10. This social g
s given by the Ladies' Aid Society of
he Lutheran church for the benefit ?
>f the church. Ice cream and cake
or sale at the usual prices. All are of
nvited. H.
3 AC
Geo. IV!. Jacobs' Bic
DAILY STC
AUGUST 1
Buy Where Buying Pays You?Th
Coffee pot knobs, black enameled,
with bolt 01
fin 1 vAnized 1 sra.1. natfnnal nil rans. .19 I
Steel traps, musk rat size, 4 inch
jaw, at . 10
Steel traps, mink size, 4 7-S inch
' jaw. at 10
Spring balances, with Japanned
back and polished dial, weighs
up to 25 pounds, only 07
Dog chains, with steel snap 05
Bed casters, Philadelphia pattern,
per set 05
Metal tea bells, only 05
Call bells, full nickel plated, Japanned
feet, 3 inch base 10
Curry or cattle cards, coppered
teeth OS
Curry combs, 5-bars, closed back,
only 05
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
Lji-i. VV 1
JOHN L. LEHMAN, .
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
JAS. A. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, B. A. Fleming Building.
A. O. STANLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, AY. Va.
Office, T. AV. Fleming Building.
W. S. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
A. L. LEHMAN.
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
Office, Hall Block.
S. B. SE1G,
Lawyer.
Iffice, Room 53, People's Bank Bl'dg. .
C. H. LEEDS,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, AV. Va.
Offir.o "PTa ll P.lno.k.
HARRY SHAW,
Lawyer,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
)ffice, Haymond bl'dg., Jefferson St.
E. M. SHOWALTER,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office in W. A. Fleming Building.
T.N. PARKS, f
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
ffice Main St., Opposite Court-house.
A. S. FLEMING,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va. -j
Office, 202 Main Street. 0
E. F. HARTLEY, s
Attorney at Law, .
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
>{Sce, First National Bank Building. e
- 1
PHYSICIANS.
C. O. HENRY, M. D., c
Physician and Surgeon,
FAIRMONT, W. Va. Office,
-Second Floor, Hall Block. n
H. R. JOHNSON, M. D., tj
'ractice Limited to the Eye, Ear, Nose
ci n .1 T Vi rrCri t
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
OSloe, Second Floor, Hall Block. p;
DR. LT B. BURK, w
rcatment, Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat.
OFFICE, 304 MAIN STREET. n'
Hours?12 to 3 P. M., 7 to 9 P. M.
Otherwise by Appointment. n
JOHN R. COOK, M. D., c.
FAIRMONT, TV. Va.
Office at Hospital. ^
DR. D. L. L. YOST, 9"
Office 225 Jefferson Street,
esidence, new building, Fairmont ave. w
DR. V. A. SELBY,
FAIRMONT, AV. A'a.
Office 123 Main Street. tj
W. C. &. JESSE A. JAMISON.
Physicians and Surgeons, fi<
FAIRMONT, AV. Va. fi<
Office JOG Main Street.
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL,
W. Hill, M. D.?Corner of Quincy ^
and Jackson street. Office Hours:
10 A. M. to 12 M? 7 to 9 P. M. Qf
DR. EUGENE W. LOMAX, ce
Qio A T o i n <3+ TT'n i rm nri t W. \ra..
OURS?S to 11 A. M.; 2 to 5 P. M.; ljj
to 9 P. M. Consolidated 'Phone 331. ar
LUC I AN N. YOST, M. D.,
Eclectic Physician and Surgeon. w<
!Ity Office Over Mansbach's Store. m:
ours?10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M., 4,(
to 8 P. M. Res. hours?7 to 9 A. 12
., 12 to 2 P. M., 5 to 6 P. M.
I have some good lots In two squares po
Court-house for sale at $375.00. H. yo
Lanham. x m<
y. ' - . """
I ^ BH
I ? c. -^>ck,
Rflonroe Street.
>RE TALK.2TH,
1904.
:at's Here.
Curry combs, S bars, made of best
cold rolled steel . - -08t
Steel tacit pullers, enameled bandie
<33Cast
steel pruning shears, 25c ones
for ". ..18Picture
nails, porcelain knobs, each-01
Food Choppers, cuts meat, fruit,
vegetables, etc., only ...98Warren
combination razor strop,
screw adjustment, enameled
wood handle, screw rod, 4 sides. -1(>i Coifee
mills, several Kinds, up
from . .ZO"Tom
Thumb" leather hand riveters
for tubular rivets, Japanned,
set thumb screw ..25Tubular
rivets for same, assorted
sizes, per box . 07T
Merriam's beveled click - rivets, assorted
sizes. p4r box .05.
DEXTISTS.
Dr. A. R. BADGLEY, ~
DENTIST: Vitalized Air Given for
Extraction if Desired. Prices Seasonable.
All "Work Guaranteed.
Dr. J. O. McNEELY,
DENTIST.
Wain Street,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
DR. W. J. BOVDSTON,
Dental Surgeon.
Office, 107 Main street. OppositePostoffice.
L. G. ICE,
DENTIST.
Porcelain Work a SpecialtyTost
Building.
n'PTTnuws
A. O. & H. H. HEDGES,
Jewelers and Opticians,
329 Water Street.
-Expert Watch and Optical Worhu
Over 20 years' experience. ?
VETERINARIAN SURGEON."
DR. JAMES E. MAGEE,
Veterinarian Surgeon and Dentist.
Jffice at Chilson & Claytor's Ei"very'
Stable. Bell 'Phone 163 R.
uissls
OFJAPAN
t TABULATED STATEMENT Ot^
JAPANESE LOSSES TO AUGUST
1?TOTAL CASUALTIES
REACH 12,055.
WASHINGTON, D. C., Aug- 12.?
"he Japanese legation to-day gaveut
the following table of casualtiesuffered
by the Japanese army up to>:
nd including August 1:
March 2S?Chinjiu?Killed, one oilier,
four men: wounded, one officer-,
1 men.
April 27?Gensan?Killed, six offiers.
73 men; wounded, 11 menApril
30?Yalu?Killed, five officers,.
13 men: wounded, 33 officers, 750;
-ien.
May _1?Aiming?Estimated casualies,
1.000 officers and men.
May 10?Anju?Killed, four men;,
rounded, six men.
May. 27?Kinchou and Nanshaa?
lilled, 33 officers and 710 men;
'onnded, 3,455 men.
June 7?Saimachiu?Killed, three.len;
wounded, 74 men.
June S?Lin-Yuen?Killed, three
len; wounded, two officers, 2S menJune
15?Fenchuiling ?Estimated!
asualties, 170 officers and men.
June 15?Tolisau?Killed, seven ofcers.
210 men; wounded, 43 officersL3
men.
July 4?Matienling?Killed, 15 men- :
ounded, one officer, 29 men.
jYily 5?Hsienchang?Killed, fouren.
wounded, three men. ,
July 9?Kaiping?Estimated casuales,
150 officers and men.
July IS?Hsijoyang?Killed', two offers
and seven men; wounded, 16 offers
and 434 men.
July 24?Taplngling ? Estimated
isualties, SCO officers and men.
July 25?Tashikiao?Estimated casilties,
1,000 officers and men.
July 21?Simonclieng?Killed, 194
Rcers and men; wounded, 066 ofii rs
and men.
August 1?Yushulintzu and Yangtsig?Estimated
casualties, 40 officers
id 006 men.
Total killed, 54 officers, 1,500 men;
junded, 06 officers, 6,330 men; estitted(
casualties, officers and men,
)66. Total estimated casualties,
.055.
You don't have to advertise to find
or tenants?they are looking for
ur property. ' But good tenants are
tre coy?you have to look for them.

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