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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, October 13, 1904, Image 1

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IS SEN
He Said In P
', 1 A;
; A DEMOCRATIC LAND
I ' THAT W
HEAVEN FORBID WE SHOULD
AGAIN HAVE TO GO THROUGH
THE DAYS OF 1893.
WEST VIRGINIA WILL BE SLOW
IN ACCEPTING THE ADVICE
GIVEN LAST NIGHT.
SENATOR DAVIS WAS IN A'HAPPY
MOOD BUT HIS SPEECH WAS
VERY ORDINARY.
EX-GOVERNOR WHYTE DID THE
REPUBLICAN CAUSE GREAT
GOOD.
At an early hour last night it was
evident that the distinguished rep-r-esentatives
of Democracy were to he
given a hearty welcome and a friendly
greeting by the citizens of this community.
Vast throngs of people filled
the streets, curious alike to see and
bear the men whose names stand ;
closely allied with the fortunes and '
misfortunes of the Democratic party. :
* It v/as something after eight o'clock 1
when the stirring music of Junkins' '
band and the light of red fire an- <
nounced that the special- trains from 1
Morgantown, Clarksburg and Gray's <
"Flat had all arrived, and that the <
. speaking would soon begin. That '
"was. the signal for the big crowd to I
press near the Court-house front in f
order that tney might near me prom- ,
_ ised eloquence. But we mistake the '
"temper and feeling of the assembled *
thousands if they were not sorely dis- '
appointed. Of eloquence there was f
very little, of new thought there was
none, and of reasons for supporting
, the Democratic ticket not a single <;
one satisfactory to a West Virginia v
^Republican, and very few over which 0
even a Democrat could grow enthu- t
siastic. a
Ex-Gov. Fleming Presided. t
The first speaker of the evening p
was our own venerable candidate for n
the second highest office in the land, c
Hon. Henry Gassaway Davis. He v
made a very short speech in seeming
happy mood, "but he managed to hold a
"up the imperialistic bugaboo and t]
prate on Republican extravagance,
going back to the Buchanan admin- t<
Istration for his comparisons. Just c:
as well compare the mode of travel ij
3n the days of Washington" with present
railroad and trolley transportation
as to try to hold up the administra- S]
tion of Buchanan as a njodel for the q
present day. - When reference was j te
made to the large bills incident to this g,
so-called Republican extravagance, a a]
gentleman standing near said "but jn
they are all paid." And Isn't it the p,
truth? It was difficult to hoar all of jc
his speech, as he frequently turned
his back to the audience and spoke cj
to his| colleagues 011 the platform, as
if to impress some powerful truths
upon them. w
Senator Daniel's Speech. r,
Following Mr. Davis, Senator John a
W. Daniel, of Virginia, was introduc- e[
ed. He paid a compliment to the p,
"'young, magnificent American com- oc
mdnwealth Itnown as West Virginia." n,
then set out for Cuba, Hawaii and the l0
Philippines. He announced that he re
was a Democrat, a National Democrat,
an American Democrat. He could
have mentioned several other brands,
such as Brvau Democrats, free silver
Democrats, Cleveland Democrats, free Li
trade Democrats, incidental protec- i
: tion Democrats and others, but the
above mentioned were all he named.
He had a great deal to say about the te
Philippines and our flag there, which Or
he designated as being in the mud. wj
This was followed by a heart-rending w]
v appeal about taxation without repre- in
sentation among the Philippines, but
never a word about the disfranchise- C!(
ment of the black man at home. Sen- A.
ator Daniel plainly misunderstood his Ai
audience. He thinks we are Virgin- Ai
ians, negro haters, anti-expansionists Rt
and all. At the close he boasted that B(
It would be a cold day when Itepub- an
licans get any comfort in old Virginia.
That remark ought to he sent dr
from one end of- West Virginia to
the other bo that Republicans here In
who ever thought of giving Mr. Davis vti
a complimentary vote might realize pr
that the tyrauical Democracy across
the mountains has the same designs
upon us she had in slavery days. A mi
ATOR
lis Speech La
go on "the Sa;
SLIDE FOLLOWED
HIRLWIND CAMPAIGN
few more speeches of that kind, and
the Republican majority in West Virginia
will break all records by fifteen
thousand.
Mr. Hill Introduced.
Senator Hill followed Senator Daniel.
It was unfortunate for him that
he referred to his former visit to our
State. That was in 1S90. The tide
began to' set in then, and in 1S92 the
whole country went Democratic.
Cleveland was elected, a Democratic
House of Representatives was elected.
and we had a Democratic Senate.
His reference to those days seemed to
take all the life out of Hie audience.
Frequent cries of "soup houses" could
be heard, and the blighting- days and
heart-rending scenes of Cleveland's
administration were all lived over
again in memory. The crowd began
to disperse at mention of those days,
and front that time on the street cars
made regular runs up and down the
street in front of the speakers, the
people no longer being thick enough
:o block the way. Senator Hill evidently
felt the chill of the audience,
lor Ire spoke only a very short time. !
tnd showed very little vigor and earnestness.
He even tried to ring in one !
of Mr. Bryan's phrases, the "plain
people," but it created no enthusiasm
'or borrowed jihrases do not sound
rood in such connections. "We.leave
)ff as we began. Heaven protect us
rora a repetition of the conditions folowing
Senator Hill's last visit to our
air State.
Ex-Governor Whyte.
Our people knew very little of exJ^vernor
PJnckney Wbyte, and so
vere wholly unprepared for the kind
>f speech lie made. His job seemed
o he to rake President Roosevelt and
buse the negroes. Never has such a
irade been heard in Fairmont. The
oor old man has the Roosevelt nightrare.
and has it had. He rang the
hanges on-the Haves-Tilden eontroersy,
brought up the Booker Washrgton
incident, declared he voted
gainst the fifteenth amendment,
nought he was right then anil knows
now. His speech was vituperative,
rdious. and long drawn out. The
rowd had become very small by the
me he finished.
Col. McGraw on Deck.
At the close of ex-Governor VVhyte's
leech. the band played a piece and
lat brought together again the scatwed
crowd who expected to hear
pnators Tfnitr-v ami Rai-npr bur rlic:
jpointruent was the lot of the waitg
assembly, for neither of those genemen
was present. The ubiquitous j
>hnny .McGraw was on hand, how-.
"er, and made a few loud remarks, ,
osiug the meeting.
Republicans Pleased.
The result of last night's meeting ..
ill have a wholesome effect on the ,
epublican campaign. That there was
large crowd present they aclcnowl- ,
ige, that there was little genuine en- s
usiasm is known, and that the Dem;rats
have no issues worthy the <
ime is more apparent than ever he- ,
re. Republicans are happy over the ,
suit, and we cannot see any reason ,
r rejoicing among Democrats. I
i
GRAND JURORS. /s
st For the November Term Has
Been Drawn. (
1
The grand jurors for the November f
rm of the Circuit Court have been ,
awn, and their itresence at court
ill be required the fourth Tuesday, j
liich is November 22. The follow
S is the list:
W. J. Kerns, Walter S. Furbee,
;orge R. Thomas, Darius Fleming, x
W. Swiger, C. D. Conaway, Xute v
iderson, John S. Hamilton, Z. F. a
unions, W. N. Satterileld, Henry i
idy, Phoenix Carpenter, Thomas L. c
>rry, Marcus Morgan, A. B. Clelland
d E. L. Billingslea. a
The petit jurors will likely be r
awn Saturday. t
The jurors for the October term of t
termediate Court, a list of whom c
is published a month ago, will be
esent next weelc.
G
Quick collections, prompt settle C
>nta?Marion Claim Agency. - x 2
~ B."HI (if
X He Was Th
n Which He i
flC NIGHTMARE.
DAVIDist
Night Tha
me Business i
A DEM0CRA1
"the r03b
MISS GORDON ~
%.
made eloquent plea for the
enfranchisement of women
? prof. McCOWAN
made COUNTER argument.
Mss Kate JVI. Gordon made an in
teresting talk to the students of the
Normal .school in the chapel this
moril irxr or llinn oVIop).- 'I'll o et n.
dents and .faculty wore all present
and a number of tlie town people, also.
Every one was highly entertained for
Miss Gordon is an accomplished
speaker and is possessed of logic unanswerable.
Her plea for the enfran-'
cliisement of women met with ready
appreciation and hearty applause
punctuated her remarks. At the close I
of her address the different members
of the faculty were called upon to indorse
her sentiments and almost all
of the number expressed their unqualified
approval. A sensation was created.
however, when Professor McCowan,
principal of the school arose
and expressed in ponderous accents
his disapproval of the entire movement.
In so doing he testified to the
utter depravity of the voting pre
cincts and stated that he considered
the polls an unfit, place for respectable I
women to go. This idea has been ad- j
Vocated frequently by those who have I
not yet gained a wider vision of the |
movement, but it created surprise |
coming from Professor McCowan, .
ng took place, and whose wife is one
if the prime movers in the Political
Equality Club. Professor McCowan
stated that he had given much
thought to the subject, so it is only
'air to assume that he was perfectly
sincere in his declaration.
Attorney B. L. Butcher spoke at
some length and gave a number of I
easons for his belief in the suffrage
novement. His remarks were corlially
applauded. An itiforma! recepion
was held at the close of the meet
ng and a large number of people presented
to Miss Gorden, all of whom
vere charmed with her personality.
Ln evening address in .some more
convenient location would attract a
arger crowd anil one by reason of its ,
:ize, more in keeping with Miss Gor- '
Ion's fame and ability.
UDGE JACKSON WILL
DISREGARD COURT RULE.
CHARLESTON, Wf Va., Oct. 12.? | '
inited States Judge Jackson, for ;
rhom a rule and attachment to appear
s witness has been issued by Judge
"orrer, of the Circuit Court of Wood
ounty, said here last night:
"I shall pay no attention to it. If
. deputy sheriff conies here he will
eturn alone. X told the judge when
he case was not called Monday I had
o leave town. Blizzard took this
ourse to secure a continuance."
Don't forget the matinee at the ?
Irand, Saturday afternoon, at 2:30. 1
thildren, 15 cents. "Adults, 50 and
5 cents. 3
pN&
<gvgfe- J
ER TARIFF." j:
?Chicago Inter Ocean.
BOLD BURGLARS [
ENTERED CHICAGO'S CITY HALL
AND TOOK GOODS BEING
HELD AS EVIDENCE IN
CRIMINAL COURT.
j
(By Publishers' Press.)
CHICAGO, Oct. 33.?The City Hall. P
in which are police headquarters and j
the office of Chief O'Neill, has been j '
robbed by burglars, whose boldness j r
was even greater than that of the j ^
the Chicago postoffice. The raid was ! %
directed on City Custodian Creigiers' j c
store room, and although the value of
the plunder was not great, the dar- .
ing displayed by the burglars was
such that their crime stands unique
in Chicago's history.
The burglary, it is supposed, was
committed sometime Sunday night.
The methods of the robbers differed
little from those employed by the
postoffice stamp thieves. *
By cutting a hole in the floor of the
custodian's store room, the burglars
crawled through the aperture from (
the basement, and stole a miscella- r
neous lot of articles that were being
held as evidence by the police in cases
awaiting trial in the Criminal Court. 'J*
JEALOUS MAN =
ID
TRIED TO KILL HIMSELF AND T
WIFE BY EXPLODING BOMB w
IN SALOON. G(
gi
(By Publishers' Press.) a5
BUFFALO, N. V., Oct. 13.?Becausf?: h:
he was jealous, Henry Hogan Camp a|
droi>ped a bomb in Odell's saloon last jc
night, blowing out his own eyes and e<
stripping his wife's arms and breast v_.
of most of the ilesh. One side of the ^
room in -which the bomb was explo- sv
ded was Mown out, the walls were j1(
stripped, and, the furniture demolish- w.
ed. It is believed that both Camp
and his wife will die.
Carrying a paper covered package,
Camp went to Odell's saloon and was gj
permitted to see his wife, who was ev.
employed (here. She says he demand- p],
cd that she go to his home with him. a!1
She refused; he took the package tj,
from beneath his coat and dropped it
an the floor. be
" wi
runcrdi u( inr. uiroa.
The funeral of William A. Girod, of pe
N'ew England, took place this after- tj,
noon from the home at that place. ln
Services were conducted by Rev. G. go
D. Smith, of the First M. E. Church. ,j.t
A. large number of the dead man's
friends wore present at the services,
rhe members of Eureka Lodge, K. of
P.. accompanied the remains to "Wood- gc
awn cemclery where they were in:erred.
Undertaker Jones was in
charge. he
coi
The prices for the matinee Saturday
ifternoon are: Children 15 cents, to'
idults, 50 and 25 cents. we
Uncle Hoz is entirely rewritten this hir
rear. it?
A PRC
rough Herer
Es Now Enga;
ras CAPTOR OF LUI
k w. r m
w
THE PAIR SPENT NIGHT IN A
CORNFIELD BEFORE CROSSING
THE OHIO.
GIRL CRIED BITTERLY AND TOLD
A PITIFUL STORY TO
THE POLICE.
GIRL IS SMALL FOR HER AGE,
AMD DECIDEDLY PRETTY, ACCORDING
TO REPORT.
JOHNSON CLAIMS HE WAS TAKING
HER TO STEUBENVILLE
TO MARRY HER.
WHEELING. \\\ Va? Oct. 10.?Revolting
in all its details is the story
told by William Johnson alias Arthur
Jones, the alleged degenerate kidnapper
of fourteen-year-old Lulu Scliemick.
of Glennova, captured with the
girl nt Stouhenville yesterday morning.
It is not corroborated in every
detail, however, by the girl, who is in
a very serious condition, having been
repeatedly assaulted in a cornfield on
Glenn's run, where she was held an
unwilling captive during all the night.
Personally the girl Is small for her
tge, though decidedly pretty, and is
not very strong. The result of her
inhuman treatment is therefore,
1 waited with the utmost concern, and
Drs. Plant and Noonie, who examined
lier, state her condition is grave.
I ones dragged her along the road
'roin Glennova to the river, then after
Tossing it. for many miles along the
J bio shore. He threatened her with
leath should she make any outcry or
it tempt to escape, and when returned
o police headquarters here last night
vas completely exhausted. In fact,
vhile sitting on the couch in the
hiefs room she fell over dead asleep.
Night In Cornfield.
It appears that the night was spent
n a cornfield on Glenn's run before
hey crossed The Ohio. Tlie first inormation
of their whereabouts was
then Agent Perman, of the C. & P.
t Steuben ville, was notified that they
ere on the train due to arrive there
t 11 In the morning. Officer Kane,
f the force at that city, was at the
epot when the train drew in. He
t onco placed both under arrest and
jok thorn to the mayor's office.
Thero Miss Schemick said she was
jurteen years of age anil at first
aid slie agreed to run away with
ohnson. He met her in the field on
uesday night and when her parents
iw him, she was afraid to return
jme, Imt went with Johnson and
alked ail night, and yesterday
orning landed at the river front,
lie fact that the place they stopped
as near the starting point convinc- ]
I the mayor and officers that the
rl was lying, and questions were (
ked repeatedly. The girl said she )
id never sinned with Johnson or did
ivthing wrong, but finally, after J
ihnsori told his story, she confessI
that she was forced to run away .
Lth him. She. however, insisted
at he did not assault her. In an- (
rer to u question as to why she left
irae, she said it was because she j
as badly treated by her parents. j
Cried Bitterly. }
During all the time the girl was r
;ing evamined she cried bitterly, j
le was poorly dressed, and without f
en a handkerchief. She wore a -]
ain gold ring and a phony diamond, a
d it was with them that It is alleged j
at Johnson accomplished her ruin, t
Johnson was also examined at Sten- r
nviile and he proved to be a willing c
tuess. He weighs about three times
are than the girl, and lias the ap- c
arance of a degenerate. He talks
rough his nose and stammers, and g
order to give his name, he had to e
through a number of gyrations, s
i understand him is difficult. s
Worked on Farm. fi
According tp the story he told at v
eubenvllle, he worked on the
hemick farm until a week ago when ^
was discharged for paying attenn
to Lulu. He had worked with
r in the gardens and in husking
rn and had made love to her. Tuesy
evening at 5 o'clock ho returned
the farm and met her .when she
nt after the cows. Her sister saw
a and notified the family, so that
took her over the hill and hid. ^
F welve Years
g'ecL
^USCHBMIcf ..
)W BEHIND THE BARS
, Tliov spent tlio night on the hill in
a secluded spot and In the morning
at 0:30 they started to Short Creek.
where they got a. skiff and went to
i Tiltonsville. The girl's shoo were
worn out and Johnson bought -Uor a
new pair and after she put them ,on
they walked to Rush Run whore they
hoarded the C. & P. train for this city.
t1. , Jt.nt .li.7 nr><
.juii Ait;' >"iu iiv?L ,
farce the girl nway. but . tU y were
coming to Stoubenville to get a 11J
cense "if the fellow woulc^give them
The girl denies that lie was to marry
her,, and ill'"!- a long questioning1.' ,|Pf
says he forced her away.
Medical Examination.
The medical examination was made ~ -.
here by Drs. Noorae anil plant nnd the
latter stated they had found tho '"tj
charges correct', However, Dr. Plant
was of the opinion that the claim of
Johnson that they had been intimate
for four months past might be true.
The father is almost heart-broken. \.
over the affair and the mother is prostrated
with grlof. The entire matter
lias created tire profonndest sensalion.
Johnson is in jail at Steubenville
and last wening tie father of
the girl, Andrew ,T. Schcmick, went , ?
before Justice Fit/pati.? k and prer
ferrcd a warrant for Johnson. In It
the charge is made rape. Ii will bo
placed in the hands of Chief Ritz to- ?
day, who will go to Steubenville this
morning and endeavor to bring Johnson
back to this Stau It m not""" ;
ihought. he will make a fight, but
should he, no gicat difficulty would
lie experienced In obtaining papers
from the Ohio governor.
Officer Kane, of Steubenville, will
secure the rewjtrd of $50 offered by
the. father for tho''arrest of the pair. , ;.c
' lit? uixitj 1U1 a V iicauu^ ',- " '< SttgmSj
ol" Johnson has not been s<it tiepending
all upon when he is brought
back to this State. : .';5
ROOSEVELT
GETS A RINGING INDORSEMENT
BY THE A, M. E. CONFERENCE.
UNIONTOWN. Pa., Oct. IS.?The
conference of the Pittsburg A. M. E.,
Church, including all of the State of
West Virginia anil part of Western , '\s
Pennsylvania, adopted resolutions
last night which are in part, as fol"Resolved,
That this conference in
its entirety indorses the candidacy . 5
of Theodore Roosovelt for President
of the United States and that ive pray
:hat our race unitedly stand for reflection
of President Roosevelt and
hat the sense of this body be commu- ?u|||
licated to the President bv bur pre
ddlng Bishop, Rev. William B. DerMrs.
Toothman Dead.
Mrs. Maggie M roothman, wife of
Christopher Toothman. whose "resile
nee is near Barraekville, died at her
lome yesterday afternoon of typhoid ""'V'?
ever. Mrs. Toothman was fifty-four
rears of age and hor death is greatly
egretted by a large Circle of friends '
o whom she was known as a kind
riend and a good wife and mother.
Che funeral* services were held to-day-.e]^flg|||
it 2:30 o'clock in the BarrackvilJe
3aptist Church. Rev. G. W. Kinsey,
his city, officiating. Interment was
oade in the cemetery adjoining the
hurch.
?
>ne Effect of Mr. Whyte's Speech.
"I could hang hlra up and. cut his
;fzzard out" said a colored man wfien
x-Governor Whyte, of Maryland, was
peaking last night. The Governor
urely made a "hit" with the colored
oiks but the effect wiU be shown Noember
S.
^ THE WEATHER. ^
W.armer To-Morrow. !
WASHINGTON, 15. C? Oct. [
13.?Forecast for West Virginia : j
Fair to-night and Friday ; warm- ]
,N

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