OCR Interpretation


The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, November 19, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by West Virginia University

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092557/1904-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

^... _.?L-,,., ....... -~*^?jjlija^?&f:ifel
AMERI
GERMAN AMBAS
STREETCAR ~
WAS DERAILED
LAST EVENING
STONES HAD BEEN WEDGED BETWEEN
GUARD AND RAIL TO
^ CAUSE WRECK.
SUPERINTENDENT SMITH HOOD
IS MUCH WROUGHT UP OVER
A TERM IN THE PENITENTIARY
AWAITS THE PERPETRATOR
IF FOUND OUT.
Ii^ar \ino._ o, ol cae rairnuut ana
arksburg Traction Company's line
this city, -was wrecked on the sharp
iwe'-at .the approach to the Coal run
aduct at eight o'clock 'ast night,
te car, in charge of Motorman
irixles Dillon and Conductor L. B.
>rgan, was coming down the steep
cust avenue grade ar the customary
>w rate of speed, when, just below
3 Coal run road crossing, the car
ddenly left the rails and before be;
stopped, swung around until
arly cross-ways of the track. Two
ssengers were aboard the car, Mrs.
sephine Skinner and Janies ffelley,
th of whom ware slightly jolted,
fcfijtot. at all hurt.
The crew made an examination
d found that three or four small
mes had been wedged between the
ard rail and the rail proper and
ijtit ten feet below where the car
aped, a small piece of iron, prenably
an axle from a hoy's express
gon, was found lying across the
Is, but. the extra precanlion to
ke the job successful was useless,
the stories had answered the pur;e
admirably.
_v - a car from the shops with wreck
ir_g apparatus was telephone'! for and
; arrived at about the same time as Mo.
15 of the Monongah division, and a
cable coupled to cbe latter was used
to null the derailed car on the rails.
.At. eight-forty the car was finally induced
to climb the rails and traffic
was resumed.
Superintendent Hood was thoroughly
indignant and no effort will be
spared to bring the guilty party or
parties to justice and if they are de- 1
tected the punishment will not be a
reprimand, or dismissal with a lecture,
but will undoubtedly Lean a
long term in the penitentiary, or.^if
boys of a tender age a-e responsible, (
a good long stay at the Reform School j
is assured them. ' ?
Mr. Hood and other knowing ones i
incline to the theory that hoys did the j
job just to see the fun, but it is any- j
thing but a matter of levity, as some r
one will learn before long. A bad <
.gang of young boys infect that neigh- a
borkood and they are known and sus- ^
pected and developments are expected
before long. This is not the first t
time that an attempt has been made a
to derail cars on this same curve, and f
this same gang of candidates for the t
penitentiary were thought to have t
in had a hand in all the previous jobs at ,
the time of their commission.
FAIRMONTERS
HIGHLY_H0N0RED:
A GOOD SHARE OF FRATERNITY J
mavis t-jurvjt ro MA- c
RION COUNTY. tt
? - Fairmont, has played an important
t ' part in the Grand Lodges of the two f,
great secret societies which were
; . held, this week. At- the Grand Kn
canipment of I. 0. O. F. at Wheeling.
Lee Reinheimer was elected grand
. treasurer and E A Billingslea is one
of the representatives to the Sovereign
Grand Lodge at Philadelphia
- nett September. At the Grand Lodge ri
I. O- O. F? E. A. Billingslea was re- w
elected grand secretary. y'
At the Grand Chapter of Koyal 11'
Arch; Masons at Clarksburg; Sam B. a(
jWV^Joltaert , was elected grand master ei
second veil. At the Grand Blue tc
Lodge E. M. Shovalter was promoted m
from junior grand deacon to senior, c?
. grand deacon. T. Wilbur Hennen
; was appointed district deputy grand
master for this district including Ma- W
rioai Monongalia, Harrison and Wet- Oi
zel counties. Harrison county has th
five of the nine lodges in this district nl
CA AC
SADOK PRESENTS
WILLIAM, OF <
STEPS TOWARD
SURRENDER ARE
BEING TAKEN
CZAR NICHOLAS HAS WIRED
GENERAL KU ROPATKIN TO
THAT EFFECT.
FIELD MARSHAL OYAMA IS TO
BE ASKED TO FAUIL! I.A I c
ENVOY'S PASSAGE
TO PORT ARTHUR TO INITIATE
NEGOTIATIONS OF
CAPITULATION.
(By Publishers' Press.)
ROME, Not. 19.?A dispatch to the
newspaper Italia Militaire from St. ]
Petersburg says that the Czar has (
telegraphed General Kuropatkin, com- (
inancier in chief of the forces in Man- ,
churia, directing him to ask Eield J
Marshal Oyama, commander in chief (
of the Japanese forces in Manchuria, (
to facilitate the passage of a Russian ,
envoy to Port Arthur to initiate nego- (
tiations for the capitulation of the ;
port. t
1
Over Half a Million Soldiers.
(By Publishers' Press.) %
ST. PETERSBURG, Nov. 19.?It t
was ofRcially announced to-day that c
Russian troops In Manchuria number ^
570,000, with 1,522 guns, and that in ?
three months there will be 66S.OOO t
troops with 1,S18 guns at the scene of ^
operations against the Japanese. Of
this number 502,000 men and 1,590
guns will be in active service in for- c
tified positions along the lines of com- t
munieations and as. auxiliary forces. n
t
Cannonading Heard. ^
CRv Publishers' Press.!
ST. PETERSBURG, Nov. IS.-?A g
telegram rom Mukden says it is believed
there that an important bat- ^
tie lias just begun on the Shahke river.
The echoes of a terrific canon- jr
ade, the dispatch states, are heard at
Mukden.
w
BIG BOOM s
G
ON IN MANNINGTON OIL FIELD. S
PITZER NO. 2 ONE OF THE n;
BEST IN THE STATE. di
hi
L;
Tliere is somewhat of a boom in the R
>il fields around Mannington. Drillng
is going on 011 the Holden, Efaw sc
ind Pitzer farms about five miles tll
rom Mannington. Well No. 2, on the
Mtzer farm, which came in this week Qr
moved a producer running 1,900 bar els
instead of 1,000, as reported at
irst. Other wells on the same farm
ire producing oil in paying quanti- se
ies. fr,
No. 1 on the Holden farm, No. 2, on ]v
he Efaw, No. 1 on the Hayes, and c~a
nother on the Pitzer, are due in a of
cw days, and then the true worth of ne
his territory will be determined. All
hese farms adjoin and it is believed Er
1, .. . ,T !? * : j
n .1. it guuu uciu lb uemg upeiicu up.
- ^
REWARD. in
The undersigned offers and will pay sts
ive hundred ($500.00) dollars reward sw
or the apprehension and conviction dr<
f the person or persons who placed th
n obstruction on the track o? the
'airmont & Clarksburg Traction
iompany's Railroad near Coal run, in wa
'airmont, on the night of November in,
Sth, 1904, causing a north bound ba
treet car to leave the track. siv
AIRMONT & CLARKSBURG TRAC- in?
TION COMPANY, rej
By L. L. MALONE, sis
General Manager. x th(
' ste
Mound City Boys Here. pul
The Moundsville football team ar- ter
ved on No. 40 this afternoon and tha
hile they are a very husky hunch Gei
et the experts who sized them up the
redict a victory for V. M. C. A. on str
:count of their superior weight. Sev- wa:
al old stars are with the visiting. kra
am ana tneir Setter team work may firs
ean a victory, tut local enthusiasts ed
in't see it that way. Wi
? : aro
Barton Is Doing Nicely. the
John W. Barton, the Baltimore and P.
aio brakeman who was struck by ' I
e bridge at Valley Falls, Thursday of
TO THE CITIZENS
GERMANY, A STA1
BRILLIANT SCENES
ING MUSIC AGGjO
SENTATIONJ
EXPRESSIONS OF AMITY AND 1
GOODWILL WERE ON THE i
LIPS OF ALL. I
proceedings mark cl.oser re- C
lationship between ger- c
many and america. i
"" ?~ . " - t
WASHINGTON, D. C., Nov. 19.? 1)
Amid the booming of cannon, the n
playing of the German National air, li
and the cheers of a great throng
gathered on the grounds of the War t
College, the statue of Frederick the ?
Great, the gift of the. Emperor of Ii
Germany to the people of the United a
States, was unveiled this afternoon hi
by Baroness Speck Von Sternberg, h
die handsome American wife of the or
German Ambassador. The event oj
ivas as impressive as it was signffl- P|
:aht, marking, as it did, in the opin- w
on of many, the beginning of a bet- c<
:er feeling and a closer relationship is
letween the American Republic and
he German Empire. Addresses ei
vere made by the German Ambassa- st
lor, the Presideat of the United tt
States; the United States Ambassa- A
lor to Germany/ the Lieutenant Gen- |n
iral of the United States Army, and in
he Adjutant General of Emperor tc
William, each overflowing with ex- !gt
iressions of amity and good-will. Ad- el
aission to the ceremonies was by w
ard only, and in the audience were in
he highest officers, of the. army _and;v^J
lavy, the principal civil officials of
he government and the elite of te
Washington society. The arrival of sp
he more distinguished guests was W
ignalled by salutes according to their mi
espective ranks from the Third and en
'ourth Batteries of field artillery. sti
ptttiq mn fTio rt J1
lto the grounds of the carriage con- PC
lining Lieutenant General Von Lee- pe
'enfeld, military representative of wc
le German Emperor, and his adju- bti
mt general, and Lieutenant General ari
haffee. Following him came the wt
erman Ambassador, Baron Von sol
ternl)erg, who was greeted with Mi
ineteen guns. In a carriage tame- th<
iately behind the Ambassador, rode Pi?
is wife and her sisters, the Misses St:
angham, of Kentucky. President ma
oosevtelt was among the last of the am
stinguished guests to reach the art
:ene, his arrival being announced by i
e regulation twenty-one guns, and ma
ie raising of the President's flag as!
1 the flagstaff of the Washington tok
lrracks. ma
Each party was preceded by a mil- the
iry escort, which wheeled to prent,
and saluted as they alighted ^
am their carriages. Immediatebehind
the President came the t.Ql
rriages of Mrs. Roosevelt and those
her various members of the Cabit.
As the audience was assembling
e Marine Band and the bands of the ^
lgineer and Artillery Com nlay- ^so
martial music. The Pres and His
e others who took promin .arts aml
the ceremonies had seat- in the ?!ft
ind directly in front of the flag- fori
rnthed statue, while several hun- wit:
ed soldiers stood at attention in 'y r
e surrounding plaza. ple
As the 'Right Rev. H. Y. Sattorlee,
shop of Washington, stepped for- m&r
ird to deliver the invocation, the
mense throng arose, and stood with tJm(
re heads, while, with deep impresenes^?
he invoked the divine bless- :
ryJ.,:Tj|jen,' with a few introductory
ftarhiMajor General* Gillespie, astahvio
the chief of staff, presented wIl0
; Baroness Von Sternburg, who f (
pped down to the statue, quickly ,
lied the cord, and released the intwined
American and German flags raDi
it had enfolded the heroic figure of wh,,
rmany's great war Emperor. As ancj
y fell apart, the Marine Band ,POn
uek up the stirring notes of the
r hymn, "Hell Dlr Im Sieger
.nz."( While in the distance thi (
t gun of the National salute boom- jnj
out on the crisp November air. and
th a burst of cheers, the audience tJie
se, and remained on Its feet until lhe
music ceased. time
embassador Sternberg's Speech. ! gIa ,
a presenting the statue on behalf; our
Emperor William, Baron Specie GerI
1 Stcrnburg
GERM
J OF THE UNITED
TVTT? r?riT-'T-i"r'T*T^i
un vr rnnj^nmLij
AND INSP!RMPANIED
PRE)F
GERMAN TOKEN
V": - - .
ijet with throughout the United
States during his visit in February,
.902, has left a deep and lasting lm>ression
on the German Emperor arid
in the German people. The citizens
if the United States showed Prince
lenry the true manner of American
lospitality and when he appeared,
e received a greeting which did not
cerely come from the lips, but which
ad the true ring of the heart.
In the many addresses, with which
he Prince was honored, the name of
'rederlck the Great was conspicuous. '
t was emphasized that the Prince's
ncestor had shown himself a staunch 5
nd true friend of those people ivho- '
ow were welcoming; the descendant '
n their own soil. If. was pointed
ut that Frederick the Great had c
jipved America's friend at a time '
'lien the young republic was in the T
Jurse of her formation, weathering '
.any storms and perils. Thus, it was ^
us dauntless Holienzollern, the fatli- *
* of Germany, who laid the cornerone
on which the friendship between e
ie two countries mknc securely rest. ^
Emperor William followedw; t'u keen
terest the movement of his brother !
America and was profoundly 1
iuched by the attitude of undis- c
lised friendship and good will which
laraclerized every step of the a rince *
ho returned to Germany as the 1 rue s
terpreter of the true American a
'MU / ; - -- . , ' .... .... 1
In order to give this visit, which had rminated
under -such happy au- 11
ices, a lasting memorial. Emperor
rur i ?i. . . r II
jiiicim canea on i,iiu genius ui ourany's
most renownQ-l sculptor to s
eate a statue of his ancestor. This
ltue he has sent across the sea as
Sift of friendship to the American w
ople. "VVe now behold it on the ?
destal from which It is destined to r<
ttcli the men who In the magnificent IS
ilding, soon to adorn these grounds,
a to he instructed in those sciences fc
tich the military genius of Prussia's w
!dier king so marvelouslv perfected.
ly the spirit of this hero inspire
5se men who are to stand. as the Z1
iars of the army of the United V
ites with- those qualities which
ike the iron Hohenzoller great
ong leaders and which alone render
nies mighty and invincible.
M
dr. President, by order of the Gorn
Emperor. I havo the honor of
ring ,you to accept this statue ar. a
:en of His Majesty's and ihe Gern
people's sincere friendship for
people of America. to
President Roosevelt's Address. je.
.t the conclusion of Baron Speck dh
1 Stornburg's speech of presents- o'c
i, President Roosevelt made the
owing address 01 acueiJiaucc. a
Ambassador: re:
'hrough. you I wish on behalf of tho ho
pie of the United States to thanlt ca
Majesty, the German Emperor, ca
the people of Germany for tho he
to the nation which you have Just <*e;
nally delivered to me. I accept It olc
h deep appreciation of the friend- cal
egard which it typifies for the peo- tuI
of this Republic both on the part cal
the Emperor and on the part of Yo
German people. I accept it not
ely as the statue of one of the
' dozen greatest soldi o? of all
i, and 'ore pr appro- wi
he for , - 'n or Col:?
but I a<. - it a.. statue of
reat ma- "-ose life was devoted *
he scr a great people, and CU?
se doet -.stened tho approach un'
:he day .. Hen a united Germany the
ild sprir.j :nto being. oc
s a no -,r Frederick the Great uy
cs very, very small group E;1
iucles Alexander, Caesar, heI
K. al in antiquity, and Napo- Ev<
, a possibly Gustayus Adophua,
''.em times. He belonged to the
ant illustrious house of Hohen- A
rn, which, after playing a strong to'w
virile part " in the middle ages, mQ1
after -nT*r?r!iioinjr' fiiime meri Hire J'PU
great Elector, who were among agl)
most' famous princes of their ft*a
, founded the royal house ,of Prus- wa?
two'centuries ago, and at last in and
own day established the mighty resl
: AMY'S
STATES, ON BEH^
? THE GREAT.
THE JURORS ARE fl
ONE AND ALL
SPLENDID MEN
SO THINKS MISS PATTERSON, OF A
THOSE WHO WILL SIT IN
JUDGMENT.
YOUNG ACTRESS IS PREPARING EK
A RECORD OF HER LIFE
SINCE MEETING YOUNG.
FEARS YOUNG'S' FRIENDS WILL W
TRY TOSENIJ HER TO ELECTRIC
CHAIR FOR REVENGE.
NEW VtlRK. Nov. 10.?Nail Pattersoli.
the actress, now on trial (or thi
killing Prank "Caesar" Young, sat In for
tier cell In (lie tombs prison to-day nei
preparing u record of her life from tio
he "time she met Young until the po- my
ice placed her under arrest. Miss nui
Patterson has been at work on this tec
lata for many weeks, and every de- or
ail and circumstance in her relations fro
vith Young or his friends has been La:
ecorded. The young actress haB fro- wit
luently intimated that she is afraid cou
hat Young's friends in revenge will leo:
to their utmost to send her to tlic Ma
lectric chair. Miss Patterson will chii
lerve herself to-day and to-morrow to ant
ace the trial Monday, when Assistant call
Jlstrict Attorney Itand will outllno nic<
he State's case to the jury. Some son
lear Idea of the State's case will the
hen be known. Miss Patterson has ly,
old her father and her counsel that Fai
he Is satisfied that she will receive of t
fair trial from the judge and- jury, row
Vhen the last j ur or - was selected late tra<
esterday afternoon, Miss Patterson ryn
nrned to her father and said: hut
"They are one and all splendid his
len. I feel sure that they will bo tab
uided solely by the ovidence, and chii
eat I will be acquitted." trai
Assistant District Attorney Rand the
as Informed to-day that' Hyman job,
tern, the pawn-broker who sold the Mr.
jvolver with-which Young was shot out:
ill and may not be able to attend ed I
le sessions of the court for the first one
!W days of the trial. The revolver tow:
as purchased the day before the neri
agedy. evei
HICAGO MAN_
DIESSUODENLYFa"
ILLIONAIRE SOCiETV LEADER
PASSES AWAY AT THE
WALDORF ASTORiA.
theh
(By Publishers' Press.)
NEW YORK, Nov. K),?Arthur Oa- ? ?
' 62ISU
n, the well known Chicago society pf
ider and millionaire, died of heart jJan_
sease at the Waldorf Astoria at 10 "
dock last night. of G
Mr. Caton came to New York about Se
week ago to meet Ills wife on his Co]]j
turn from Europe to attend the Tr
rse show. Severn 1 days ago lie beme
indisposed and was under the
re of physicians but was believed to p
recovering up to the time of his
ath. Mr. Caton, who was 55 years - ^
1, was one of the pioneers of Chi- Mr
go and had amassed a great for- m
Jtw , A V** J VV VJ?? V
50 what Ward McAllister is to Mew ? "
rk. ,rMa
Manr
THANKSGIVING SERMON
n Be Preached By Rev. G. D. Smith I??
at Central Christian Church. ra
On
n accordance with the established C0 '
itom. the churches of the city will '
ite in a Thanksgiving sermon. On 111
r morning of that day at 10:30 '
lock, the sermon will be preached Vr
Rev. G. D. Smith, of the First M. as 1,1
Church, and the services will be
d at the Central Christian Church.,
arybody is Invited. T11'
lens, '
Look Out, Young Men. Wedn
. man from a down the river Purcl?
n went before Justice Amos this 5'0,tr
-ning and complained that some tlie P
ng men had been saying damig
things about his daughter, and ^
t he wanted them prosecuted. Pie |
: referred to an attorney's office. |
on.
^ Mpunflsvlllq. ^ ^ y ,

xml | txt