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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, December 02, 1904, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86092557/1904-12-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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Iui; wuicii was nut regtiru- u
doubtful before the elecure
to go for Parker beif.the
Sheehans was look- a
?gave Roosevelt a major- v
. J. M. Guffey made such is
ing toward carrying West
d Pennsylvania for Parbe
hoped be may be conne
of the Democratic Nagers.
Col. Guffey is cerght
man in the right place
nblicans, as their majority
s has been trebled since .
a Democratic leader. fi
1. Kerens has for several r'
the Republican .National "
an for Missouri, and it h
3e would be the U. S. Sen- "
hat State with a reversal ?
s, but now that a reversal
ilace Mr. Kerens' chances 3!
n so bright. The favor- ?
chairman of ihe Republi- 131
Committee, who managed p
npaign unaided by either u
or the national commit- ^
for the Grafton Sentinel Hj
iv.'-y w 5CW ito ucaitu&o uu iiittl uiailllllUlll H
structures to tie built in tlie business 1
center of its hamlet. At first it an- I
nbunced that the "block" was to be B
two stories high with a large base- B
inento next it said it had made a mis- B
& take?that the building was to be 8
Sp ' three stories high on the tipper side
anil five on the lower, thus having two
KS',' basement rooms; a third account is to
j||f j, - the effect that it is to be "five stories
Ipt/ty high from the back and four from the
S^-'VMam street line." Now, the Sentinel
?|||will5sbonhaveasmany "stories" about
house as some or its "big
blocks" contain. Oh, dear, dear, but
a littie town has to brag on what few
improvements it does have. Goodness
Ij&glcipws Grafton was in sore need of
stich buildings as Fairmont masons
and carpenters are helping to
' bulla.' When it gets twice as ,.large
as it is. it ought to have a street: car
line and it might have slacked water
If It -was on a larger plver. The only
way Brother Bolden's town can he big
It is not often that the Charleston
Gftv.i rped in (he prejudices of
Democracy; finds anything or merit
in the acts of Republican officials.
When that rarity happens it is worthy
of . partlcularization. When it apt
proves of the action of a public official
who is a Republican, it is deserving
of conspicuous notice. For instance,
it says of the appointment of
Dillon to he tax commissioner: "The
Gazette tins had few opportunities to
congratulate Governor White upon
really meritorious appointments and
it hastens to take the opportunity for
doing so offered in the appointment of
the first lax commissioner."
Concerning Mr. Dillon the Gazette
says:
"The appointment of C. W. Dillon
I as stale tax commissioner win strike
| the average citizen as about as good
an appointment as could be macie.
While Mr. Dillon has no especial fitness
for,the place in the way of practical
experience, that the Gazette Is
aware of, he is a man of character,
ability and Industry?of a judicial
turn of mind, and disposed to be failin
bis dealings betweeft men. Of
course there will be some who will
say that his- appointment is a sop
thrown to the coal men, as he has
been the attorney for a number of
coal operations for some years, still
there could bo no man found against
whom some objection could not be
urged, and few in opposition to whom
"so littie of real merit could be said.
The Gazetle takes il that the appointment
goes to Mr. Dillon not because
4t will please the operators, but rather
because, in spite of his affiliation
with them in business. he stoodagainst,
the large majority of them
and staunchly 'supported Dawson for '
the nomination. Be that as it may. 1
Mr. Dillon will carry into office the
confidence of the people who know '
mm. anu lie will sorely disappoint
them if he fails to enforce the new '
assessment laws with justice, and in 1
the spirit in which they were explain- ;
eel to the people during the late cam- 1
paign. He has sworn to see that 1
all property in the State is assessed *
for taxation at its true and actual J
value, anil he will come as near do- f
ing it as lies within the power of r
man.''
i
HOW NOT TO CATCH COLD.
_ a
-t
People are more likely to catch
:old in the back than tliey are gener e
illy aware of, and if neglected it may '
prove a serious matter. The back V
especially between the shoulders. !<
should always be kept well covered 15
mil never lean with your back against
inything that is cold. Never sit with S
he back in a direct draft; and when a
varming it by the fire do not continue
o keep tiie back exposed to the heal w
ifter it lias become comfortably
varm. To rlo sn is _ - ir
ournal of Health.
The total admissions to the World's
^air reached close to the 20,000.000 A
oark. and unlike other great fairs it sj
nore than paid expenses.
- \V
The President and .Mrs. Roosevelt a,
re celebrating the eighteenth anniersary
of their marriage to-day.
C?
While there is a solid North there cc
: no longer a solid South.
HOME WANTED ^
<lr
or a Bright Little Six-Year-Old Girl 01)
Now In Care of Humane Society. ar
of
The local Humane Society has now fo
a charge a beautiful 6-year-old girl sc
or whom a good home is desired with
esponsible people. The little one of
rill bring happiness to some one's br
ousehold if properly treated, and tli
lay be seen by calling upon Officer T1
ample or Hiss Flossie Fleming. in
Other children ranging in age from D<
9 months to eight, years are at the pr
belter at Wheeling, and homes are N?
esired for tliem. Mrs. Guy Allen, la:
resident, of that city, would be glad of
> send information concerning them an
> any one. th
HOLIDAYS AF
But COMUNTZIS', the only
ufacturers injWest Virginia, ar
FINE GA
Our own put up one pound fai
25 cents and
Call now and look over our
save you m<
v I * C2 nn r*/xL rt ^
> ? a # v i m / %
COMUN
COIMFECTI
3-^2G J
Consolidated P
NEW RAILROAD BUILDING.
For several y< a?
has been quite gene'a I that the,ma
land United States had about all t
steam railroads it could: tlse. and til
no considerable additions to ralljw
milease were to be "expected.
Of course, it was known that ra
way building was going on all t;
time, but most people hag the fcf
that this was chiefly improveme
and reconstruction of existing Jin
rather than new construction.
Therefore, readers not actively
touch with railway affairs v/ill 1
somewhat surprised to learn that tl
new railway mileage of 1904 will n
be less than 4,GOO miles or about tl
distance from New York to San IVa
cifico and back to Omaha.
New England added only 12 mile
but use was found in tlie Mi del
States for 248 miles, and for 4SG mill
in the Central Northern States. ]
the Pacific coast States 5G2 mill
were built, in the 6ulf States East i
Texas f!h2 miles, and in the Nort
western States 083 miles.
But the largest addition, over 1,8(
miles, was made in the Southwes
no-.v the most rapidly developing pai
of the Nation, and largely in Texa
which now holds the title. "First i
Railway Mileage," helrl by Illino;
from 18(19 until this year.
An era of active railway building i
our old and new Pacific possession
would now surprise no one. In fat
it lias already begun in Alaska, an
preparations for it are making in th
Philippines.?Chicago inter-Ocean.
TWO NEEDED REFORMS.
An agitation is started to eliminat
further the fee system in West Vii
ginia. The emoluments of severe
officials "afford excellent opporttmit
for the extension of ?uch reforms.
One of these is the office of th
?Jerk of the Supreme Court. Till
gentleman reaps an Income of, $10,00'
:o $20,000. His fees come from va
-ious sources," including' the printinj
>f records. There is no reason wh:
he clerlv's income should not be re
luced to $5,000 and the residue of th<
ees paid into the State Treasury
[Tie same reform could be applied t<
lie clerks of the county and circuii
:ourts and sheriffs. The clerks coult
>e put on salary and all the fees- paid
nt.o the State without hindering the
fficiency of the offices. The percent
ges of sheriffs could be scaled down
'hree thousand dollars a year is revnue
enough for any of these officers,
f ir is constitutional, the law making
he auditor the statutory attorney for
jreign corporations should also be
assed. % i
All these measures would net the
tate Treasury at least $50,000 a year,
nd it would not impose a penny of
ix upon any person or interest- They
ill probably be submitted to the
egislature. and should pass.?'\Vhee.
ig News.
HENS AND THE EGG CROP.
By careful Breeding and selection
trough a series of years the Maine
gricultural college lias produced a
rain of liens that lay over 200 eggs
year. The record hen laid 251 eggs
ithin the past twelve months. The
verage American hen lays about SO
ggs per annum, so the Maine hens
y more than double the average per
ipita production. There was no
trresponding increase in food cost.
The egg crop of the United States
worth more dollars than the wheat
op. In New York City The average
lily consumption of eggs is over 2.10.000.
which at two cents apiece
nounts to $40,000 a clay. The people
New York pay more for eggs than
r either the police or the public
hools.
The important change in the habits
hone hmiiffhr ntiniit hv thft lVIsiin#*
ceding experiement. is to induce
em to lay in the fall and winter,
aree-quarters of the eggs consumed
New York during November and
scember are storage eggs laid the
eceding spring. Comparatively few
?w Yrork families know what a fresh J
id egg is. Even in the spring most
the eggs sold come from the West,
d were laid several weeks before
ey are eaten.?New York World.
?
(E COMING
fine CANDY retail mane
here with their full line of
INDIES,
ncy and plain boxes from
upwards,
stock for we arc able to
oney on
CANDIES.
ITZB S >
IONERY
VIAIN STREET,
hone 184.
FOR
STYLE A.
if COMFOK
a>- ' . I
BRO
ea
nt
es v
in
Has no i
1G
Ot
ie
nf
CORNER MAIN ar
le
3S ===========================
in SAYS EYE ABUSE
is CAUSES APOPLEXY
Df
h- Chicago Doctor Presents an Unusua
Aspect of Cases of Sudden
>0 Death.
t;
rt CHICAGO. Dec. 2.?Dr. Chalmers
s, Prentice told tlie members of the I!
n lino;:; Optical Society, at the annua
is meeting which was held recently
that many men died of apoplexy and
n heart failure because they abused
:s their eyes.
:t "Men come from the farm to tic
d city and break down because of tbt
s strain upon their eyes," said the op
tician.
"In the country- their eyes are accustomed
to long distances. They gc
e on until middle age without confining
r- themselves io an oliice. Then sudden
li ly.they come to the city. After that
y their eyes must be used in work that
is confining. The result is that they
e break down prematurely. People
s wonder what caused it. They are
0 right when they attribute it to the
.- sudden change in the mode of life.
5 But it Is the unusual test upon the
y eyes that causes the snap.
"Men who break down anil die of
3 heart disease and apoplexy are often
. the victims of their own short-sight3
edness. They have not treated the
t eyes properly. The test is too severe.
1 The eyes respond by undermining the
[ integrity of the brain. A breakdown
accompanied by a fatal stroke of apo
- plexy is the penalty."
Dr. Prentice advocated an innova
tion in the practice of the optician.
"Do not be content with the story
toid by the man who comes to yoti
Cor relief," he said. "Of course, it is
necessary that you question him
closely about his hours of work, Lite
time and length of his working day.
But. that will not suffice. It would be
well for you to go that man's place of
business and study his desk, the light.
that strikes it and then you will be
in a position to prescribe for him intelligently.
| SOCIETY |
IN FULL UNIFORM
Was Captain William Winder When
Married to Miss Taylor.
(By Publisher*' Press.)
ERIE, Pa.. Dec. 2.?Miss Ethel
Taylor, daughter of Margaret Taylor,
of the Erie, and Captain William
Winder. U. S. N., formerly commanding
the gunboat Michigan, stationed
at this port, were united in marriage
at the home of Mr. Taylor last evening.
The groom wore full captain
uniform of'"-the United States navy,
and was attended by George Dewey,
son of Admiral Dewey. Rev. H. C.
Dnco rtf tRrv l?Tvir.n/vnnl
i moo, v_?j. i.x^^^iowpai uui v, ii, jjci
formed the wedding: ceremony.
Dr. Foster. TJ. S. N., and. Lieutenant
Fisher. U. S. X.. were present at the
wedding.
KING EDWARD
Congratulates President Roosevelt
and He In Turn Writes to
the King. ,
(By Publishers' Press.)
BIRMINGHAM, Dec. 2.?The Post
hears that American Ambassador j
Choate has handed to King Edward ]
a most cordial letter of thanks from ,
President Roosevelt for the King's ]
congratulations on the President's 2
election. According to the Post Mr.
Roosevelt stated in the letter that ite
hopes that his new term of office, so <
auspiciously begun by the commence- ?
ment of negotiations for an Anglo- r
American treaty will witness the c
bringing together of the two conn- e
tries in even a closer union ol' r
friendship.
IMPRISONED MINERS >
Were Released This Morning After
Perilous Experience.
(By Publishers' Press.)
SPRINGFIELD, 111../Dec. 2.?After
having been imprisoned for hours in c
a burning mine, fourteen men were
rescued early this morning from the
shaft of the Woodside Coal Company, fc
The top works of-the mine were destroyed.
and the flames spread to the
workings. L
^ifc ? 5 "MSSMsk
T,
'V SStmsSassiisw . -.7?'/r$pi >. >HS
BEST
Shoe its equal
yv\iBrsT's - $3.50.
LADjES' 33.00.
id PARK.
BEEF AMD PORK OP
ANCIENT LINEAGE.
Paymaster's Remark Brings Forth
i Some Amusing Answers From
John Bull's Sailors.
. IVlen Are Careful, Howover, As to the
[ Nature of That They Give
to Fishes.
I LONDON". Dec. 2.?One of the paymasters
in the royal navy made a remark
in print the other day which
; has been conducive to some amusing
information relating to sailors' appetites
and how they satisfy them.
This officer made the statement
> that men-of-war's-men were so bouji;
tifully fed at sea that they became
surfeited with goofl living and heedlessly
threw large quantities of food
overboard.
Here are some of the answers to his
remark:
I Jack. Bowles, A. B., wrote from
Portsmouth: "Dear Sir?You gentlemen
who berth aft don't always
know why 'Poor Jack' throws his
grub overboard. The rule in my last
ship was: Select the pieces of beef
too tough to eat but hard enough to
take a good polish when manufactured
into snuff boxes, and throw the
rest over the side to propitiate Neptune
and bring a fair wind."
Charles Prowse, A. B.,t of Bristol,
said: "Our ship served pea soup '
throughout the voyage twenty-one
times a week. It. was pea soup at dinner
time, 'dog's body' (.the same mixed
with masticated crackers and
molasses) for supper, and 'dandy- _
bunk' (the same with lime juice and
chewed crackers), for breakfast. 1
When the cook was in a hurry he put
soup in the water to soften the peas.
Bill Fay, A. B., of Liverpool, declared
that no sailor in his ship figured
their beef and pork to be young- ^
er than the memory of Admiral Nelson,
K. C. B. . He thought it a mistake
to suppose that the food which
made good fighters at Trafalgar could
nreserve its virtue forever
DIVORCE EASY IN SWEDEN.
Al! One Must Do Is to Go to the Capitol
and Tell the Consul He ^
Is Deserted. I.
STOCKHOLM, Dec. 2.?King Oscar
and the Swedish government are considerably
worried at the rapid de- ?
crease in the number of marriages irSweden.
For years the young men, both in
the cities and in the country, have ?
shown disinclination to marry, and as
a result the number of the children ^
born during the last ten years is only
very slightly in excess of the deaths. _
and with the steady drain of young
people who emigrate to America the
population remains almost stationary. H
Here. too. divorces are more numcr- 6
ous than ever because of a peculiar ?
Swedish law.
When a couple come to the conclusion
that they are not fit mates al! '
they have to do is for one of them to
go to Copenhagen, remain there twe ?
weeks, and notify the Swedish consul ^
that he or she wants a divorce because
of.desertion.
A prominent citizen of this city,
who was a delegate to the recent DPeace
Conference at St. Louis, notiFiPfl
(ho fiwcrfich pftnoitl rhitrp that ht\
had left his wife, who immediately
obtained a decree, and her former
rus band returned home with an
American wife.
Fred Alay and his new coon song.
'Bach. Hack. Back 10 Baltimore," was
ill to [lie good at the Grand last ^
light, this voting man's clever con:eption
of the song pleasing the audi
nee lo such an extent that he had to
espond lo several encores.
Pipes and smokers' articles for
fmas. Clot, yourself one at
CLYDE S. HOLT S. X
Why not let the Marlon Claim
Lgency collect that claim for you? x
Price cut half in two on ladies'
oats and (jackets, at J. S. Pople's.
Go and see Howard before having _
he children's pictures taken. x
' ? ; V
December magazines at Larncy Of
.loyd's, 314 Main streebi^^^^^p^
| JOHN L. LEHMAN,
i FAIRWO\"T W Vn
Office, Han Block
JAS. A. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law, | ' V;%FAIRMONT,
W. Va.
Office, B. A Fleming. BailSis?.
A. O. STANLEY,
Attorney-at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va. ,
Office, T. \V. Fleming BnJlritrg . .7S
________ ~
Attorney at Law, . ?'
FAIRMONT. W. Va. *
Office, Hall Block.
S. B. SE1G, :
Lawyer.' ;
Office, Room 53, People's Bank _ 1
A. L- LEHMAN,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va. Office,
Hall Block.
W. S. MEREDITH,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. VA ' <}
Office, Hall Block.
HARRY SHAW, |
Lawyer, -7;
FAIRMONT, W. Va
Office, Haymond bl'dg., Jefferson S?.
E- M. SHOW ALTER,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT. W. Va.
Office in W. A. Fleming Bniltfing.
T. N. PARKS,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Vs.
Office Wain St., Opposite Court-boca?.
A. S. FLEMING,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, 202 Main Street.
.
E. F. HARTLEY,
Attorney at Law,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, First National Bank Building.
? ? : " _
PHYSICIANS.
T. J. CONAWAY, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office Lours: 9 to 32 and 1 to 4L
Office over Cochran's Jewelry star*.
,'V
C. O. HENRY, M. D-,
Physician and Surgeon,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hall Block.
H. R. JOHNSON, M. EL,
Practice Limited to the Eye, Sar.NoM
and ThroaL
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office, Second Floor, Hall Bleck.
DR. L. B. BURK,
Treatment, Eye, Ear, Nose and ThroMt.
OFFICE, 304 MAIN STREET.
Hours?12 to 3P.M,7to9 P. M.
Otherwise by Appointment
JOHN R. COOK, M. D.,
FAIRMONT, W. Va.
Office at Hospital.
DR. D. L. L. YOST,
Office 225 Jefferson Street.
tesidence, new building, Fairmont ate.
wn. v. ?. oc:i.ovv
FAIRMONT, W. Ta.
Office 123 Main Street.
W. C,~~& JESSE A. JAMI&OM.
Physicians and Surgeeaa,
FAIRMONT, W. Ta
Office 306 Main Street.
WOMAN'S HOSPITAL,
. W. Hill, M. D.?Corner off QnineS'
and Jackson street. Office Emara:
10 A. M. to 12 M., 7 to 9 F. ML
? -"S ii
DR. EUGENE W. LOMAX,
312 Main St., Fairmont, W. Va.
[OURS?S to 11 A.M.; 2 te 5 P. ML;
to 9 P.M. Consolidated 'Phrase 533
= ?gflSaBH
LUCIAN N. YOST, M. O.,
Eclectic Physician and, Surgeon.
3ity Office Over Mansbaeb's Store.
[ours?10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. ME,
to 8 P. M. Res. hours?7 to I A
[., 12 to 2 P. M? 5 to 6 P. M.
DENTISTS.
Sr. A. Ft. BADGLEY,
ENTIST: Vitalized Air Given tor
Extraction it Desired. Price? Hca
sonab.'e. All Work Guaranteed.
$
Dr. J. O. McNEELY,
DENTIST.
Main Street,
PAT-PTWnMT W
" DR.
W. J. BOYDSTOH,
Dental Surgeon,
lice, 107 Main street. Opposite J
Fostofflce. |
___ _ __ ?
DENTIST.
Porcelain Work a Specialty.
Yost Building.
HPTTPT IKS
A. O. & H- H. HEDGE8,
Jewelers and Optician?,
329 "Water Street. , ,
Expert "Watch and Optical Work. ,,, ' t
Over 20 years' experience. '
VETERINARIAN SURGEON.
DR. ~JAMES E. MAGEE,
eterinarlan Surgeon and Dentist.
Ice at Chilson & CXaytor'a .Xdvtsat
Stable. Bell 'Phone 164 K.

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