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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, November 20, 1906, Image 1

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VOLUME in. ~ FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1906. NUMBER 182. j
I DISGRACE!
THE DEMOCR
LOBBIES OF EVERY
niuf iinrfr the
IllMHIla wiivaii >
SUN ESTABLISHED
People Not In
It a Little Bit
I K ?
GUTHRIE, Okla., Nov. 20.?The
I Oklahoma Constitutional convention
began to-day what will probably be
a sixty days' session. Advantages
. gained by the Democrats at the elecSff
tlon of November 6th, will permit that
? party to dictate in detail, every porH|
, tlop of the new State's charter. There
arc a nunareo ana wcivc uciogai&ai
98 of whom are Democrats. An ae'
tlve campaign is on for the organiza
i'-, tion of the convention with eight can
dldates for president. Already the
brewery Interests, the life insurance
companies, the Prohibitionists and
woman's suffrage bureaus and laboi
. federationlsts have lobbies establish
ed. Headquarters have also been se
Vcured for unknown lobbies, the inter
eats back of them being secret
TROUBLE AT THE
ATHENS NORM J L
Ipi
i WAS ADJUSTED BY NORMAL
8CH00L REGENTS AT THE
HUNTINGTON MEETING.
;>. One of the matters, that, came Sefore
f the Board of Resents of the Normal
School at their recent meeting In
tfe Huntington was the adjustment of n
difficulty arising from differences ex
|m istlng between Miss Davenport, principal.
of the Athens Normal school
and the local hoard of that Institution,
Several of the students in the school
i * '
;/ were guilty of reprehensible conduct
;/ and a fellow student made tne iaeuny
cognizant of the fact. In order that
!j , the same smoothness that character!*'
od the school mlirh' exist, the inform
cut was expelled after the boys who
t-?; should have been expelled had sound'
ly thrashed him. The father .of the
' Y boy, who was ejected from the InstltU'
Y tfon, brought salt against the school
;;V atul had him reinstated. The local
hoard concurred with the father. This
caused a break between the 'ocal
board and the faculty of the Athens
normal. The local hoard threatened
s>.: to resign If matters were not adjusted
to Its, way of thinking. The Norma
Board sustained the faculty In sei
tllng the difficulty.
6. & 0. DIRECTORS
BOARD WAS CHOSEN AT MEETINC
OF STOCKHOLDERS IN BALTIMORE.
BALTIMORE. Mil.. Nov. 20.? Thi
f$' annual meeting of the stockholders o
fei the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Com
Jiany was held In the new general ol
flee building here at. 11 o'clock yes
fe i- terday. The following directors wen
ll'j' re-elected for the ensuing year: Ed
H:. ward R. Bacon, Joseph R. Foard, Johi
pif;- P. Green, Edw. W. Harrlman. R. Bren
& Kevser. James MeCrea, George F
I Randolph, Samuel Ilea, Norman B
Ream, James Speyer, Charles Steele
James Stlllman.
The vote of slock was quite large
and mainly by proxy.
/ Mr. Oscar 0. Murray, president o
the company, presided, and Mr- C. \X
Woolford, the company's secretary
acted as secretary of the meeting.
Mr. Murray was complimented 01
the good showing made in the annua
report which was sent to the stock
holders nearly a month ago.
C. K. Ford, Charles Nlt/.e anil A. I
Crane were the Judges of election.
fh- ?""rr/l ?F flipjpfnra will mpc
Hjjk'j, some time within the next month fo
organization.
"Homeless 28."
g.e The Board of Directors of th
fe"; "Homeless 2C" will meet next Fr
r _ day evening and the president desire
.a fall attendance at the meeting as
K number of important questions w!
^ 'a be up for consideration. ^
iiiiyii|gi i Mili Kiin Mil
UL SCENE!
mm in fi
k
>
| UNITED 8TATE8 AND GREAT
1 TALK
LONDON, Nov. 20.?A dicker I
| Britain ror ine excnange ")i mo r\>
| and Jamaica Is on according to re
j ent of the Publishers' Press from
| tlal suggestion came from Englun
| ment, It Is said, showed a wllllngn
| believed Jamaica would accept Hi
I when New Foundland's consent I
j ada would object.
SI OLE GUN AND j
RAN AWAY
YOUNG LAD OF PARKERSBURG
WAS NOT ANXIOUS TO ENTER
PRUNTYTOWN SCHOOL.
| PARKERSBURG, Nov. 20.-After
hearing that his mother had made ap,
plication before Justice Riittencutter
, to have him commuted to the reform
| Bjchool, Earney Houchin, the fourteen,
yenr-old son of .Mrs. Elsie Houe|iln.
J yesterday stole a shot gun from his
j home, sold it for >2 and got as far as
Slstersvllle on the money before his
absence was noticed. He was arrested
at that point, however, and is now
In the county Jail awaiting to take
the trip to Pruntytown.
Some days aeo J'w, Houchin swore]
out th" warnnt charging incorjdgl
1)11" ' ) ? S tliUUI. I1UI UOIIR 1 -.III. J ..j |
him, on account of crowded:
1 conditions, and the mother wanting
the toy confined In the Jail, the matter
was kept quiet for fear he would
run away. But the boy sot next.
Mrs. Houcliin reported the matter
to the justice as soon as she found
the hoy had gone. It was learned
that he had boarded a street car for
Wllllamstown, and a telephone message
(here received (he reply that he
had boarded the northbound train at
that point for Slstersvllle. Justicej
Ruttencutter called ttp Slstersvllle by
phone and learned that the train had
already arrived and that the boy had
gotten off and was near the depot.
Constable Nolan went up yesterday
afternoon and brought the boy here
last night.
IT BORE FRUIT
A CERTAIN LECTURE IN THE LAW
[ SCHOOL HAD DESIRED !
EFFECT.
\ unnniKTnwsi Km Oft The eon
[ ference held In a hear-to-heart fnshI
Ion between the faculty of the law
I school anil the lambs feeding therein
. upon the legal ambrosia provided by
the Institution, relative to their decorum
when In the building, seems to
have had a good effect and the animals
' arc gentleness Itself.
| Nothing was said In the daily papers
at the time, hut It has been so
forceful for good that the all round
; understanding reached, tacitly perhaps,
lint emphatically on tho part
of the faculty, may now be noted.
It all happened because some child
3 I1K0 personages in me scnuui jini.t-u
f pranks of d load and vigorous nature
. to such an unheard of extent that the
. pianos on the upper Door rebelled mid
i. their noise refused to ascend over the
> ordinary hubbub In the lower cort idors,
. So about this time Dean Hogg, who
j knows n situation when he sees It,
t decided that there should he very little
delay. He dispensed with lectures
. for an entire hour and the seniors anil
,? Juniors were put -upon the carpet la
as neat a fashion as has ever been Ihe
i, good fortune of the aforesaid Iam'os
to road about.
' Drs. Hocc. Brooke and Wllley
. spolie. not In a castigating, quernIoub,
fault finding way. but openly,
ntul In fact fraternally nn.1 Impplly
a at the same time enforcing the fact
I upon tlie latent local understanding
thnt It was time to call a halt an.I
that in future no gentleman should
t he permitted to tiring Into the lector#
from doors, horses, cows, loco?
motives nor gold mines, and that no
r foghorn to (-ties, nor callope yolpa
would go. Since then all Is peace,
sweet peace.
Building Collapsed,
e HUNTINGTON, Nov. 20.?At Wllt
llamaon. Mingo county, the building
!? in which was located the Mingo News
a collapsed owing to excavations being
II made, and entailed a loss of $15,000.
There were no fatalities.
5 ATTEND I
ILL CONTROL
+
BRITAIN ;
OF TRADING SOME ISLANDS. ;
istwcen the United States and Great j
illlpplnes hlands for New Foundlund t
norts which come to the corrspond- j
a high "diplomatic source. Tho Inlil
and the United States Govern- |
ess to discuss the proposal. It Is |
te change, hut a hitch might occur I
i sought. It is also likely that Can- :
+
Many Railroads
Will Be Sued
MAN ESTABLISHES OWNERSHIP I
OF PATENTS FOR ASH PAN
IN GENERAL. USE.
PITTSBURG, Pa., Nov. 20. ? Sails
against every railroad In tiie United
Stales may Be entered as the result
of a victory In the United Slates
[court yesterday, when the jury awarded
damage* of $10 to dames II. Mr|Cttms.
who claimed damages from the
j llaltlmore & Ohio railroad for the infringement
or an alleged Improvement
in the ash pans used in locomo
tlve tire boxes. It was the first liino
|in over 12 years that such a ease was
tried before a jury. No particular
f mount of damages was sued for. Htid
after an ayreement of counsel Judge
Archbald Instructed the jury to render
j the verdlel of $10.
| While the damages are only nominal,
the result of the suit Is a com
plete victory for tho plaintiff, lis it
shows that tho patent rights are vested
in hint. As these fire boxes are
now in use on nil the locomotives
| burning cot|l tn the United Slates
salts will bo entered against railroads
as soon as the result of this action is
definitely s?U!ed.
GREAT MEETING
SEVERAL CONVERSIONS AT CENTRAL
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
LAST NIGHT.
The heavy down pour of rain d?rreased
the attendance last night, but tltore
was an intense Interest manifested.
Rev. Shearer spoke on "Ten Reasons
for Becomins a Christian," and pointed
out the individual's need of
Christ, humanity's need of Christians,
the need o( Christ in the home, in
hardness, the need of Christ to cause
men to live righteously and honest
with their fellowmen. One needs to
he a Christian to have the hope of
eternal life.
One must be a Christian if ever lie
expects to enter through the gates Into
heaven. Chris offers to fill every
need for us.
The chorus is doing effective work.
Mr. Haley sang two impressive solos,
i To-nlglit the sermon theme will be
"The Gateway Into the Kingdom of
God." The service begins promptly at
7: CO.
Bowlers Will Organize.
The members of the Fairmont Howling
Club will meet to-morrow niglit
and effect on organization. The alleys
In the Yost building on Fairmont
avenue have been repaired and are in
first class condition.
RED HANDED
. SWAY ir
4 i
ONE MURDER AND
MANY ROBBERIES
duct in uniiD?
inui ju iiuuiiu
PITTSBURG, Nov. -0.?One ranrili'r,
a robbery In which three people were
almost suffocated by chloroform ?n<l
an attempleil hold-up was the crime
record In McKeesport yesterday. In
Pittsburg the variety of robberies and
attempted robberies ranged from
cburch collodions to tbe contents of
refrigerators.
Tbe murder of Antonio Tuscla of
Jerome street, McKeesport, promises
IpifJRL
ENDS LIFE WITH
CJjRBOLIC AGIO
-- i L n i
tiZia a vui4llcl
With Her Lover
WHEELING, Nov. 2*0.?Jennie Griffon,.
a pretty South Side girl, was
found at 12:30 this morning dying on
the steps in front of the bakery of
A. H. Nolle, No. 3C0C Bolt street. Four
young men, whose names were not
given by the police, discovered the dying
girl, and at once noil/led the police,
who lost no time In entering
upon a searching investigation.
Dr. E. L. Armbrecht was summoned,
but ten minutes after his arrival the
young woman 'passed away, without,
so far as could be ascertained, giving
any information as to how she came
to be In such a condition. Dr. Armhrccht
said the cause of death was an
internal tlose of carbolic acid, th'e
young woman's mouth and lace being
burned by the fiery liquid, Which had
also spilled over her dress. At first
the police were unable to discover the
bottle or other receptacle from which
the poison had been taken, lint at 2:110
an empty broken tumbler was found a
few feet away, which contained a few
drops of lite acid, and It was evidently
from litis that the dose was taken.
At first the police were Inclined to
believe that it might he murder, but
lutcr developments tended to show
that the girl had taken her own life.
Jennie Griffith was the daughter o!
Samuel and Sarnh Griffith, residing at
the corner of Forty-second and Water
street, with whom she lived until
about two weeks , ago, when she became
an Inmate of the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Gardner, til No. ,'IGIP
Kofi street, two doors below wliero
sh? committed suicide this morning
The cause of her leaving Iter parents
" ii? uui iu/ii ucru in id uiuiiihi),,
From the Gardner family ft was
i^arnrd Hint Jennie left the house last
nlerlit ata 10 o'clock, and that she made
rhis significant remark as she walked
out:
'Good bye, you need not o.xpect me
back again."
The Gardners thought nothing of
this, as the girl had been out until
midnight on two other ,occosions during
the post two weeks. She had an
admirer, a voting man. whose name
was not ohfnInert. In whose company
she was seen often.
The girl secured the embolic acid
''rom the Gardner home, where n quantity
of it Is always kept. Besides the
tumbler had been identified as coming
from the Gardner house.
i Coroner Rogers was Informed, and
| gave permission f orthelmetnoinhrd
gave permisison for th elminedinto re*
| inoval of the body to the home of th?
j Kim Mi family at Forty-second street.
.This morning he will hold the Inquest
over the hody.
It Is probable that the cause of the
suicide was a quarrel or disagreement
between the girl and her admirer.
though this 1ms not yet been definitely
established.
Th" young woman bore a very good
reputation. Her father is a mill worker,
and she has two uncles, David
Bell and John Mnrrlns, also mlllworkJ
crs.
CRIME IS STII
I PITTSBURG
i -
to disrupt n well-organized branch ol
lite Black Hand society. Joe Bpavutto,
another Italian, confesses to having
fired seven "bullets Into Tnscia
The murder took place in Rnssejl ?1
ley at f) o'clock yesterday morning.
Sparatto declares that Tracts call
ed on him Thursday afternoon and told
him to lie at the Duquesne end of the
Rlvertou bridge at 7: HO o'clock that
evening with $500. Sparatto agreed
hut diil not top the promise. Tester
day morning niacin is muu 10 mm
oallcil again and became Insistent
when Spiirnllo offered to compromise
for $100. Tills was rejected ami Tin
cia domended that Sparatto accom
pany lilm, and en route the shooting
tool; place. Sparatto' was caught aft
er a long chine.
Burglan Ute Chloroform,
Mrs. Samuel Fields, her daughter
Mrs. Frank Schuman, and Mf, Schu
F THE OKU
SOMETHING D|
^WEST VIRGINIA 13 EXPECTED T
SECOND IN C<
I WASHINGTON, Nov. 20.?The I
! 1905 In Illinois was 38,434,363 short
| 592, according to a report made to t
; I'nrker of the United States Geoto;!
| Illinois still ranks next to Penn,j
| production In West Virginia In 1993
| port says the expectation Is that the
I Virginia to be the second coal prodnt
| fact that the Illinois miners suffers
j spring, while those ol West Virginia
| I ing continually.
| The Illinois con! mines In 1905
| who worked an average of 201 days.
I men were on strike during the year
1 The larger number of mines In Illin
| day. During the fiscal year 1905 til
I Illinois mines and 635 men were Itiju
I shots are the principal causes of the
NO JUBILATION J
OVER VICTORY
JOY OF WASH-JEFF STUDENTS
OVERSHADOWED BY GLOOM
OVER DEATH OF TROY
HUPP. J
WASHINGTON, Pa., Nov. 20.? b
Washington and Jefferson college sin- (,
dents decided to call o# all arrange- b
ments made for celebrating the vie- |,
tory In football at Pittsburg Satur- day
over W. U. P., on account of the 0
death of Troy Hupp, the former W.
and J. student and football player. A (
big demonstration had been arranged
at the main college building, as well R
as a big banquet for the football play- |,
ers and coaches by the Alumni Athlet- ]
ic association. 1 IK.' luimi ui 11 U[<|<.....1 !
caused general gloom here, which has |
overshadowed the Jubilation left over (
Saturday's football conquest. W. and |
.1. college students took an unofficial ,
holiday yesterday. ^President Moffat '
refused to grant officially this day off, j
hlit plainly told the student body that s
be dl.l not expect them to attend reel. (
In lion#,
Dr. .Moffat, before the student body ,
In chape! made a somewhat nnttsttal
speech, In which he not only eulogized t
Hupp, the dead football player, hut (
gave his hearty Indorsement to prop- <
erly played football. I
- j
Big Landslide j
.? j
DELAY TRAFFIC ON THE C. & O.
RAILROAD?MUCH WATER IN i
THE KANAWHA. I
CHARLESTON, W. Va., Nov. 20.? i
Heavy rains have licen reported from i
the headquarters of the Kanawha and
New rivers, and tt Mg stage of water i
Is expected. There have been a number
of heavy landslides on the Chesapeake
& Ohio, one at Cotton Hill, to
miles above here, so large that the
Choasapeako & Ohio is building n track
around It for the transfer of trains.
No. :!. from the East, arrived eight
ami one-hair hours late.
A Fall in Clothes.
Clothes came down at the 1'nion
i lolhlne house to-day. There came
a stronc gust of wind and the dummies
In front of the store blew over.
LL HOLDING
AND SUBURBS
' man were found unconscious in their!
rooms, SIS Ninth stret, HcKeeaport,I
yesterday morning by Miss Edna!
. Fields. They were almost suffocated.
Utirglars hud uoen in uic uuuse uuu wi t
left a howl containing more than a
- jilnt of chloroform and a sponge. They
[ had evidently become frightened, as a
i pile of silverware and clothing wna
i found on the ground floor ready to be
, carried away.
James Gibbons and Charles Hobbp,
i each aged 18. were held up by two ne,
grass In McKeesport early yesterday
> morningwhlle returning from work In
- the mills. The highwaymen demanded
- money nml under pretest of reaching
; for It Glhbona brought forth a revol.
ver. The negroes fled. Gibbons IB
the son of a McKeesport detective.
About 2 o'clock yesterday morning
Ian auempi who umuu w iuu ui? mwuo?7|
(Continued on Page Fire.)
IHOMA CO
0IH6 AT THE
1
*
O RANK
OAL PRODUCTION THI8 YEAR. |
olal production o( coal during j
tons with a spot value of $40,577,- |
.he geological survey by E. \V. |
cal survey.
Ivania In the production coal. The |
was 37,791.580 short tons. The ro- j
returns for 1906 will show West j
Ing State In the Union, from the |
I from a short shut down last |
for the great part were kept go-1
I
V
gave employment to 68,053 men |
The records show that 15,289 j
and lost an average of 21 dnyB. J
ols work their men eight hours a I
ere were 199 fatalities In the t
red. Prematuro blasts or windy j
fatal accidents,
ohn A. Clark
Talks Fair
RESIDENT OF THE ASSOCIATION
IS VERY ENTHUSIASTIC 0V
ER THE NEW VENTURE.
"How's the fair coming on, Mr.
lark?' asked a rcpresenatlve of the
fesf Virginian today.
"Oh. first rate, I guess. We have
een at work right along on the
rack, and If bad weather don't set In
m early we will have It almost comleted
this fall."
"It is reported that It will he a line
ne when completed."
"As a practical horseman, do you
Itlnk It will be a good track?'
"Yes, I do. There is no good roaon
why we shouldn't have one of thu
est In the State. The ground seems
iccullarly adapted for the purpose. I
iave been over the ground and have
lie engineer's! report and a prolllu
if the track and from this informaIon
there can he no doubt but that
in elegant race course can he had.
rhen the surrounding ground rises
list enough to build a grand stand
10 that the horses may be seen at
ivery point."
"What do you tldtik of Fairmont as
i fair town?"
"1 don't believe there Is a better
own in the Slate In which to hold a
iininty fair. Fairmont is the center
it h thickly populated district and it
h easily accessible trom every point,
ind every year transportation faclllies
are being bettered. Then the peodo
In this region are prosperous and
irogresslve and they will welcome an
nlerprlse of this kind. Many of the
ijclter class of farmers will take an
interest In it and almost everybody
will attend. We want to make It one
if the largest and most successful associations
in the Slate and with the
ioynl support that we expect and In
many cases huve been promised there
I. no rlouht in my mind but what It
will be."
"Vn*i n co fhn rttt'ttnn nf enmn rrrvrwl
i uu mr o-mivi
horses and familiar with conditions
governing associations. Do you think
thn new association will he welcomed
l)j the owners of horses and will then
bring Rood horses here so that wo
ran he assured of good races right
along?" (
"Certainly. This would he right In
the circuit. Wheeling Pnrkershurg,
Clarksburg, Elkins, Fairmont, and a
few towns In Ohio and Pennsylvania.
We would get the liest horses In this
part of the country, und ninny from
further away."
"Will all your stockholders he In
Fairmont?"
'No, not necessarily so. nr fact, I
am very much In favor of inviting our
farmer friends to Join us and 'tecome
interested by takinp stock. The succors
of the proposition, I contend depends
largely upon the assistance of
the farmers, and if we should make It
a close corporation, and not allow
them to have stock and a say In the
nana moment, then we worth) not get
the support from them that wc should
haw. Yes. air, I'm In favor of making
It a fair for the farmers, and it
Is the Intention to linve as many of
them as directors ns possible, and In
ftict, for everybody In Marion and adjtlnlng
counties. It not only promises
to be n pood Investment for them,
but it will benefit every farmer In
ihlu naxHnn and when they are oros
porous we all live better "
L08T.
Lost gold watch. Initials C. W. D
on case. Finder return to tbls offlci
and receive reward.
Dres^d chicken at Robth'fc t
T) F I t N II ttl
along nicely. The students are doing i|
good, conscientious -work,
Miss Ware will give an entertaiiwS
ment next Friday night An admla- 0
slon fee will be charged at this enter-,
tainment
cital will be free. Several ol;hef' Pt^Sj
pi Is will take part in the projp?mme^*H
the teacher, Is a graduate In hinder- jl
garten work. She la also a Hue vocal- -g|
1st and twico a week she gives (nstruo- 9
tlon to the class In vocal mu?|o.
sick at her home In Camenc,' ia j
pected to resume her dBUw-lat'ft^J
two very good chapel talka.-K?|ffj
Dr. BIbbert8 who was here In th^
Edward Mills also gave
? -
Virginia, nam 10 ine jinuuiiiui ui wnw
Fairmont Norma] 3chool a few'iAlSnM
ago: "Do you know that we hwe Jtwji|
largest attendance At the tlniyengtl^B
that we have ever had hi IhejWtEM
The principal of the Nomal achooi'aj
replied: "I congratulate you. Do yoi^ fl
know that we have the largest attend- nj^H
ance at the Fairmont Normal' we hiv?jjg|
ever had In the fall term?" .
The Board of Regents Tito a very ;
important meeting at Huntlnjtfoh last M
week. The board compiled Itarepo^H
for the coming State Legljuiitirs' .'.ftfcfl
which It made recommendations for ffl
the approprlallon It wants In
two years. ... dgfiB|
The Parkeraburg State Journal has S
| published an article saying: An en- Sj
j dcavor will be made at the mattlrtiirjaiBj
I M,? cinfo T.ntrlfllnlnre . In Jantlnrv to 9
* W ? v?-Mupiuiuilll U ? MM MUII^|UJMH
pass a bill to abolish the NoiraijfSH
schools nnd to Inaugurate a system ofS
High schools In all the smaller town*/ j
in the State that can support;tttfrajfl
The Principal of the Falmopt.lSKrifflH
mal school says that this State could : '
never hare made the progreS'U)$^m|
hart It not been for the Normal tchoola. .^
The cry from almost every wlmtjr In Ifi
the Slate Is for more teachert: until. ;T
Superintendent Miller had to call a'.tql
fourth examination. And yet the
Stale Journal would abolish jfepjajpfij
satisfactory means we have foriiawBBli
Ing good teachers. So many third rate If
teachers will he emnloved this'.vShMM
that the Inevitable result.
-V.7I he a demand for better teachers,
and under the condition the Institutes'
cannot furnish them, the unlveraftyJa
ennnot furnish them, the High schools ||
cannot furnish them; the only schools
that can In ahjt degro'aupptir^5i^|f
manrt for better teachers 8r# the Normal
schools. Not a State In th?jjn?
Ion with their many years of experl- ||
enco In educational work evef'MOptafjH
such a plan as the State Jouftuh jilifigB
~ . .... .. ? - ffl
posmriu auuusu iu? milinai
and to look to the High schools would ||
set West Virginia back ten year* tarn
educational progress. No State 'han'v*
found hotter means for supplying skill- .
ful teachers than by or throosh Its .
The Fairmont Normal School InjB
equipped to giro not only good aca- 9
d^mle instruction, but with Its art
teacher. Its elocution teacher, ltayfiiilBB
and Instrumental, muslo teachers, Itsflj
kindergarten and model school teach- 9
era Is able to give training beyond ||
lanyming mm uuh ?vor own
In this section of the State;
or thing to do Is to thoronghlyoguiBw
and support these schools and to en?*
ply them with the mtfst capable immB
skillful teachers to be found, fcrJijgj^HB
era of teachers should; be th?best 3{
teachers. . i'zMSalaM
?
AHIe Dent, of
to *pendf4t few days at his horn, on

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