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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, November 29, 1906, Image 2

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Wg^SKmKm
HH|^^^^np i i|r t
hmv^ f lAIIIHII *H
.^Kft ! MmWI m
^ ^ ^ '
IINGjJ?reMln* ^and^Rejh?j
>toy
igiai Hotel
I Terms lor permanent uuura t
aatrtti'-Sv. 1
00 J
AND BE CONVINCED.
CH FPOM ELKINS CONTAIN
ERROR CONCERNING B.
0. PAS8ENGER SCHED
I)'following letter to the editor of
Vest ^Virginian from Mandel Se>ress
agent of the Baltimore and
ftjritM'n- error In our Issue of tha
relative to the schedule of trains
e:drafton and Belington division
?B. and 0. Mr. Sener's letter
d' the question very clear and
In full as follows:
Iditor the West Virginian.
article In your Issue of the 24th
ogt come to my attention, bearm
'Bthlns date line, and to the
| that under the new passenger
schedule, which became effective
(u&dsy. passengers leav'ng Klhln:
Ha the morning will have to readme
time In Belington to cntc'i
lq for Grafton. Tills is not cor- ,
R rect, as reference to the enclosed J
Ktlme table will show. Passengers can
leave' Elkins dally at 0:30 a. ra., run- ~
Siting Straight through to Grafton and
^ifarrlving at 8 55 a, m? as heretofore,
i and leave Grafton, returning at G:55 *
c?;;.|S m., running straight through and ar- j
Ijdvlng at El kins at 9:25 p. m. Tills ,
v. '; gives the people of Elkins and points *
?K<?loug the Grafton and Belington dl- *
vision a first clasa service of being
otde to spend all day In Grafton. There
fe\-- la also a morning train out of Graf- 1
leaving at 9:15 and arriving at El- I;
| kins at 11:16 a. m. The afternoon
Iftrain over the West Virginia Central 1
Pittsburg railroad? the Western
| Maryland Une?leaves Elkins at 3:20 c
KjVOlock, and hence no longer makes 1
llliptnectlon with the B. & O. train at e
KKrangtbn which leavs there two
KStoOrs earlier?at 2:05 p. m.~In order f
L to give passengers, bo desiring, the al- 1
Blpfagtage. of making a connection with ^
'. train, No. 65 at Grafton. The only
jg cnange from the old schedule, there- v
f.oer Is !n the running ot this ufternon 1
w rain, and this gives people on thj u
;y~fcrunoh lino the opportunity of makclose
connection with a fast 1
trate on. the main line This certain- *
Kj)^<ioes not hear out the expression
euritaJned in the last sentence of your v
E'- artlcle from Elldns. 11
Very sincerely yours.
MANDEL 3ENER.
S1: All persona having claims against tho <1
ft'firm of C. E. Hunter & Co., will pre- f<
9 sent the same to the undersigned true|
tee for settlement and all persons Indebted
to said Arm will without <Jo!ny,
pny dm same to said trustee. o
S. 3. K. StVEARINCEN, a
i rustoe of C. 8. Hunter & Co.
Thiii ^tit day ol November, 1800. ^ ^
^ty;>ace8. '.*
Prom the Chicago Kenord-I'crtid.
"If the people of America wo
keep the coming generations from
habiting madhouses they should al
iRh Indiscriminate tnarringca, for
that hallucination called love, i
IIfa nn.rlnpru on tlift rti
uiwnc MIVII j?? ? ?- --- ?
[irinciple that a successful eattlen
choose tils stoc^.'
In the above sentence Dr. Jul
Grlnker, professor of nervous and m
tnl diseases at the Chicago Po.st-gr
uate Medical school, last night vol
a warning lo the American public
the great dangers which may confr
it In the near future. He spoke In
Public IJbrury building, under the
?plces of the Chicago Medical Socii
?: 'AmeWcan nervousness: lis cn
ind cure." A large audience llstei
:o the address.
Dr. Grinder eliminated all sclent
terms from Ms lecture and told his
Hence In plain words of the nervi
diseases which were slowly, hut st
ly, eating their way Into the lives
i he people o( his country. Constih
lile stress was laid on the subject
marriage anil heredity, and tlio gr
evils which result from bud anuria
were shown.
"Like begets like " said he, "and
nervous system bows to the law of
life?the law of heredity; the law t
governs your lift and mine. If
ire bundles of unstable nerves ;
abnormal susceptibilities, It Is but
ile trouble to trace the cause back
lur forefathers. The youth of to-c
should be educated and compelled
ahoose his mute In the way Hint f
aorses and cattle are chosen. \Vhei
uen comes to marrying, he shoi
shoose his wife In the same way tJ
she chooses n new dress.
"Love is a wonderful thing. It
i hallucination, nn illusion provic
>y nature to cause men ami won
o mate and to procreate the speci
3ut love should lie thrust In the hs
(round nnd relegated to the sci
leap of worn-out adages if the hoa
tod security of posterity is to he t
?n Into consideration. Do not hr
our children afflicted with die e\
hat havo boon inflicted upon you. Si
'ailing In love with a pretty face. a
;et a wife who is healthy, and will r<
itrong and wholesome children,
i "If there could he a law passed
ills country by which men anil won;
would be compelled to undergo phj
:ul examinations and have the, phj
al records of their ancestors iuvei
;ated before n marriage would he
owed, It would be the best thing tl
tould possibly happen. If It wore p
Ible that this law could be passttmdreds
of diseases, ailments, and !
vould be eradicated from tho rac
Dr. Clrlnltor spoke of the prcvnfll
tauses of nervousness, nnd told of t
tumorous little things by wlllch t
leuresthenlc could he easily dlst
tulshed. America, he said, had nu
ifirvous people than any country
he world, almost one member of
>ry family In the United Stales
ng afflicted with some form nr otl
if nervousness. 'Among the most n
'mis class, he said, women predoi
tated.
"You see thousands and lliossan
pf nervotiv women on the streets evr
Itty," sold he, "and about nlnoly-nl
put 'of a hundred should he in a si
arlum. The shopping liablt Is one
he great causos."
Besides heredity, Dr. Clrlnktr si
l at environment hnd much to do w!
he prevailing nervous epidemic. T
tinging up of children, he snlil, w
he most hniiorlant and the most
lored phase of the sltuntlon.
ihrdlshrd'lhsrillcshrdtetnolnshnl loir
d shrdi shrdlu dlu npu upti up
f*
f. HOULT JOTTINGS.
f*
HOULT, Nov. 28.?It now looks
f we would have a Utile of tho rei
?r Thanksgiving weather.
Mrs. Huffman whom we report
net week as sick Is very 111, havl
? -1 v *?J'?.1 mttVi n onrt
ypiioicj, cuiuijiiubicu ???
lervous breakdown. Her family a
rleuils almost despair of her roci
iry.
Mrs. Harry Johnson has return
rom StafTord and reports that Ett
he little (laughter of Mr. and M
Vlllinm Bailey, is Improving.
Mr. Ezra Dnugherty, of Uniontov
ras calling on his father-in-law, Mat
iurnworth, and daughter, Mrs. Sylvi
is Burnworth, Sunday.
Mrs. Florence Swisher, of Cool
lospital, was home on a short c
fonday.
Pnul and Lawrence suuerueiu ?
rork at Highland were home on a v
: Sunday.
Rliki of Living.
Tour chances of escape are nbc
flual whether you stay Jn town wl
he automobiles or go no the Adlri
acks and run the risk of being Ink
ar a deer.?Buffalo Express.
LOST.
Lost gold walcb. Initials C. V.
n case. Finder return to this offl
nd receive reward.
Don't wnlt mm your utlourp
ntirely out before ordering bit
n now and try our new jit il
'T S '
QUESTION FOR OIRECTOR8 TO DE- '
CIDE NEXT MONTH ? 80ME- 1
uM THINO MAY BE DONE. 1
III- f
ho' Are Baltimore and Ohio railroad em- 1
Eet idoyes to secure any Increase In wages. (|
10,1 This Is a Question which is becoming '
me more prominent as tbo date for the 1
lan meeting of the director* next month
draws near. It Is thought the matter v
"us will be discussed at that meeting, a! "
en' 'hough there Is no Intimation on the e
'a<1' part of nny official which would war- <!
ccit rant the statement that an Increase ?j
"I ?ill lie authorized.
ont Howevr, there Is reason to believe u
the t),at the employes of the Baltimore & ''
an Ohio consider themselves as well, If
ty. not belter, off at the present time an.! J"
use nr.der the present wage scale than
led those men on other roads who have 11
receited Ihcrenses. This feeling of
Ific contenlnipnl Is the direct res.ilt of the ''
an merit system. Installed by President "
aus Oscar 0. Murray. Previous to the In 11
ire- crmbency of Mr. Murray It was I he. '
of cusloni, as It Is to-day on many roads,
tra- to All vacancies in the ranks from out- 1
of aide sources. The result was lltrt '
eat men who hud worked long and faith- ''
sea fuuy |n their positions saw others
brought In to All vacancies ahead of 1
'he them, a situation which minimized an '
a" en-ployc's chances for promotion. Pros "
hat ident Murray changed this ami put the
we men sfltiarely upon their merits. To- ''
wd day when a vacancy occurs promotion a
I"" Is mailt! from the ranks. The faithful !l
t? and conscientious employe has a "
lay chance to demonstrate his worth, and n
U may rest assured that sooner or later "
Ins lip will bo given whatever recognition
a a ho has won. So, while no general In- n
aid ctease In wages has been made since "
ini President Murray took office, tils In- "
stailatlon of the merit system has. it
Is Is safe lo say. rendered the employes
led of the road more satisfied anil conten
tented than any 10 per cent, rulse In
es. wages could do. "
iclt Employs 57.000 Men. a
ap The Baltimore and Ohio employs on "
"h its entire system aboal 57,000 men. Of
'll'' this number about 10,500 live in and
Lv" around Balimore. Thy (ire employed
'I'1* at the lermlnnia at Locust Point and v
-?1' Curtis Bay, the freight yards in South ^
Maitlmore, the ware houses at Cant- "
*al' deu. the stations, at the Central tmild- E
ing and at the Mount Clare shops,
la '11 >,,i,I t 11,,, ,iii.?ntnrM nf lite rnnd vote
ien an increase of wages and follow out ^
rsl" (lie plan of the Pennsylvania, whereliv K
rK'" i.ll enipioj'OB who earn lean than $200 e
a monlli are given a 10 per cent. In- "
crease. It would cost the company an ''
1il mormons sunt. A readjustment of
os wages was made in 1il0ll, when som:
e('' men received an increase of 10 per 11
cent., while others got as much as 20 *
e" per cent. .Mr. Murray hus manifested ''
11a keen interest in lite welfare of his "
'lfi employes, a fart which Is evidenced by e
,ie t\;e popularity he enjoys among them. 11
The Chicago Tribune, In a recent
>rt" editorial on "The Resurrection of a
Rallroaii," touches upon some Interest- w
ev" ing points, and pays 1111 excellent tri- n
',e' Imte to lite hand which has been pow- tl
,el erful enough to lift the Baltimore and b
Dl"' Ohio out of the depths of Insolvency ?
11'" 10 the acme of prosperity. It says: d
"Under the elder Garrett the Baltlr'3
more and Ohio railroad prospered
greatly. lie extended It to Chicago. Ite h
n3 i-nparted to it a dividend-paying powet ?
,:i" that apparently could not bo shaken. 0
r Under the reckless management of the C
younger Garrett the road speedily lost it
' ' Its high standing and became Involved I
J"1 in almost Inextricable difllculiles. The
Intensity of competition, which ne hail
ap been partly Instrumental In provoslng P
'p" by ntsh enterprise, cut Into its reve- w
tines. If the roail was to carry freight e
ll1' :is economical}' ns its competitors, Cl
up
" ""It winnow hnrl \\r% Kivnt nn rojlfl- I ^
bed and rolling Block. It was Impos- a
Bible to get t tie money,, and 10 years N
" * ago the llultlmore and Olilo went Into
4" the hands of receivers. There It re 1*
nialned for three years, ami then he- I1
4* pan a reorganized existence. c
"The upward progress of the road h
as since It got out of court has been even o
go- more startling than lis downward ?
march under he younger arrett. The o
ed receivers added nothing to Its mileage, ai
ng which In 1889 was 2,047 miles. To- vi
of day it Is 1,030 miles. The gross earnnd
tags have advanced from $28,400,000
->v- to $"7,400,000, and the net earnings si
from $7,400,000 to $31,300,000. Operat- n
e-.l Ing expense have sunk from 71! per a
le, cent, to J3 per cent., and dividends C
m. on common stock have risen front nil tl
to 0 per cent. The surplus, which was a
rn. less than $1,000,000 in 1801), is now Is
on $8,S90 000. Several causes have eon- t<
in- trfbnled to this nmaxlng conversion
Ol UC.Qjiiail HIIU UU auiuciit auiiiivitHi
It's One is the expenditure on equipment li!
tilt nr.d vomited, which hns reduced oper- ft
ating expenses. Another Is the intelil- w
lio pent extension of mileage. Points cl
is- whore great volumes of freight, can si
he secured, as at Pittsburg, and in It1
lie coal regions of West Virginia, have hi
been made tributary. But these causes m
1,11 would not have beer, sufficient to raise P<
the ton mileage of the railroad from W
m* 5.137,(ion,000 to 10,714,000,000 units and Is
cn the freight receipts from $20,000,000
to $00,000,000. if it had not been for
the Industrial prosperity of the conn- w
_ tiy. That prosperity makes freight, m
" ami It puts money m me treasury or a ce'
railroad. While the freight reclpts "
ware trebled, those from passenger P'
^ huslness were only doubled. k
It Recovery In Freights, "
I ? "Growth In traffic andecoDomfcsIn
.560.ji li 'thit iIiVh r*>coV- ,
ty has been-greatly affiliated by the K?
ractlcal cessation of rate cutting by' J*
te great railroads of the country, t'n- 1B
nestlonably there has' been less rale' ? ,
siting under the 'community of In- ?
rest" itollcy. While large blocks of ?'
id stock of the Baltimore antl Ohio *
ere held by other great roads. II was nt
III likely that It would lower rates to "
tit business ,away from theiji. Tlu JJ]
uestloti Is, whether the elimination of j0
ompetltlon has not raised the rates
rom a point when' they were perhaps
nfalrly low to one where they are W
robuhly unfairly high.
"To what extent the Baltimore ant ft
tliio has been paying rebates Is tinnown.
The natural effect of their
liolltlon would he an increase In the ft
vearge rate per ton mile, lint the I
ayntent of rebates has ceased or .
reatly decreased only within a comaratively
recent period Bn;l us the ?
ale per*ton mile of the Baltimore anil *
ililo was higher In 1905 than In 191)11, J
he presumption is that the new tie- 4
nrture as to rebates has had no tip- ft
rcclahle influence. *
"There may be a dispute over the *
ulrness of the freight rates of the J
ttiifclrnore and Ohio. There can bo no .
ispiite over the fad that it has been 4
,'letl with extraorillnnry mpifltty out 4.
f the sloughs of Insolvency and math! =
...c. It l,is nn,1 .,nM.A.r..1 so/] ?1 Tt hau
nctiuiij1 UJIU |?uni-|i.ii iwuii. 11 Jin.) i
lie facilities for handling preal vol-'
raes of traffic anil Is so happily situ
led that It can command lite traffic.
I Is so strong that It would take many t
ears of management worse than that:
f the'younger Garrett to bring'it to
te straits it was In seven years ago.';
-Italtlmore American
1 Q
MEN AND WOMEN. '
The Austrian Emperor has morn
Itlos than any other monarch. He is I
king nine times over and a duke IS __
imes. ?
I'rof. L. H. Bailey, director of the
lollege of Agriculture. Cornell, pal-i
crslty, was elected president of the
.ssoclation of Agriculture Experiment
nations at ICS recent meetings nt
lalon Rouge.
Champ Clark, the somewhat errallc
Ilssourl congressmnn, has two unratified
ambitions. As a hoy he yearnd
10 lie either a college professor or
prize fighter, but Instead developed ^
tto a politician.
*
Lord Rothschild, who is taking a %
i-nminpiit im-i-t in the commission A
'Iilch Is considering as to tho best <
errltory for Jewish colonization. Is, ^
he wealthiest member of the wealthl-i J
st and most famous banking house J
1 tho world. t
Hon. Oscar Strans, of New J'Ork, H
fit) Is to become secretary of com- ^
terce and labor, has leased the beau- _
fill Italian palace, just completed
y former Senator John B. Hender- II
on, where he will live during his resl- I
race In Washington. 11
Miss Phoebe Cousins has taken up
er winter residence In Washington,
here she will work for restoration
f the canteen to the Army. Miss
ouslns enjoys the distinction of be- \
tg the only woman who ever was a ha
lulled States marshal,
id
cai
Tho doyenne of women doctors Is
robably Miss Elizabeth Blackwell,
ho received the first medical degree m,
ver conferred upon a woman in this phi
Dtnitry. She was bom m England, to
hich country she -'returned In 1861 T
tier prccticlng for somo years in (
*,0?1|""'"V? y-rf? .p? i"?iTTr'
mti. 8old and reMnmonded by B ^ ^
? ... "r
rent Kldneji. mnlj point to wwk Udnoy I
rva. The Ildnrf, lifci the Hew* ud.tbo I
ouch. Ond their weoknet*. not in Uw omn I
>11. bat In tin mtoo thntcontrol end (tiido
I Mrautben tbem. Dr. Sboop'i Bestontlro ii
wdidne ipecWallT prepared to revb that
trolling nerrei. To doctor tbeKldueiitlona.
tile. It ii tu|? of time, u<l of loaoegu
1.
'' ?*" ' Tim nr * w?V If tin wWik
Ids. or is <kirkami strong, if you have symptoms
Brights or other distressing or dangerous kJd.
r disease. try Dr.Shoop's Restoratives month?
Diets or Llquid-and see what it can sad will
for you. Drugrilt recommend and Mil
)r. Shoop's
lestorative1
E. * BILLINGSLE* & CO. [
MAY LOWE BARKER, *,
STENOGRAPHER, J
322 MAIN STREET * I
V*
SECOND FLOOR RCOM 5 *
*
i
IVANCIGH'S
ORCHESTRA
HJBNIBHSS <
Music for all Occasions
At Reasonable Prices.
Violin, comet and piano or any
ither combination of Instrument*
it desired.
T. IVANCICH,
Leader and M|r.
Lessons given on all Instrument*.
6. I
PlumblUQ and I
Gas Flttlofl. {
217 Walnut Avenue. *
Consolidated Phone 594 ?
Bell Phone 421-R fc
l its Money
you wan
Ne buy and tell all kinds second
ltd household goods, Clothing, etc.
w Gas Ranget and heaters exehangfor
coal stoves, the only place you
t do this in town. Jewelry bought
i sold. The best place to tell;
i cheapest place to buy?No other
e It. Send for our agent or call on
one.
He Second Hand Store
R nrt Hurt I An JJnnco
JIIIIJ /1UUU1UII HUUdU J
F. W. GARRETT, Prop,
98 Jackson Street.
Cons. Phone, 35S. ,
?
FAIRMONT PRES8INC CO,
First Class Pressing and RepelrIng
Ladlei' and Man's
Clothing
MONTHLY RATE, S1.M.
Y'ork Called for and Delivered.
Ball Phone?26W.
Consolidated Phons lit
?
bbott's New Market
Esh Eggs and Country Butter
Always on Hands. Young
and Old Chickens.
r Specialty is Pond Caught
Fresh Water Fish.
HE OYSTERS ALL SEASON.
Oive us a Call.
Text Door to Koon's Marble
Works, ' Jackson St.
SHREWSBURY B. MILLER,
Civil Engineer.
Offloe?Jacobs Building,
ralrmont, W. Vs. P. O. Bex, 3M. I
Ullroads, Surveys, Reports, 1
Foundntlons, Mining, 1
lydraullcs, Concrete Conatruetlan 1
Superintendence. ^ |
Engineering.
ew i urn..
Inilluna State Superintendent nf
ublle Schools Fassell A. Cotton hat
2
[implied one of the most complete
stories of the public school system ?
f his State ever gotten out by a
immonwealth. It contains a resume
f nil the work done by the schools
3 well as a complete history of the
trious Stale superintendents.
Frank H. Mason, the American con;
il general at Paris, has been deslgatod
by the State Department as an
ildlllonal member of tbe American |
ommlsslon now In Germany to Inves- ?
gate tariff conditions. Mr. Mason Is , |
tariff expert of wide experience and \
i especially well pasted In all mat- '
ira pertaining to textile trade.
FT
hnrgely becntise of his name anil
Is unfailing good nature considerable
in has been had by the newspapers
ith James M. Griggs, of Georgia, to
ualrman of the Democratic Congrosonal
Committee. Some newspapers
sve dubbed him "Grim Jlggs," (hough FE
- . ? -1.1
a is generally regnrueo u? an uum
ember of the House. He served his
lople on the district bench several 1
jurs before coming to Congress, and
a lawyer of first-class ability. ?
. 4Ptles
quickly and positively cured
ltb Dr. Shoop's Magic Ointment It'a
ads for Plies alone?and it does the
nrk surely and with satisfaction.
chlng, painful, protmdlng or blind 1
les disappear like magic by Its use
?n Mlnl/al Cinnul rial! fin. Kfl I i
Seekers for the best C hrfctmas
for the least money?Useful Acceptable,
Durable, Ornamental?Lend us your Ears.
It is .1 little early to begin Christmas talk, but you are doubtloss
pondering over your Christmas gifts. Why not make a
lire from the purchase of trivial and perishable things unci while Sg
spending no more money, yea, even less money, secure. NometHmi|i
which can neither get lost, nor is easily destroyed. A gi ft whose ?
claily service provides a daily pleasure?a constant rtmc^brnnc^-^S
Wednesday, Nov. M, 1
We befin a China sale that surpasses the unusual and jpasseii':;^
irtb the extraordinary.
Thousands of the (Inept pieces of China in this sale*?evetgrj^ffl
one a suitable gift. '
Mow Listen, 20 Per Cent Off
in; endless variety of chop plates, salad dishes, creain anil stigir
sets and fancy articles.
30 Per Cent. Off 'aJ|
Hundreds of vases, fancy plates, dishes, bowls, tea and chocolate rt
T _-i < _ ti ?> _ 1 ji._ i ti. inicii ^
uook tor me uiscouih uara ou inc iiidicf. ijiwi nrnwyour ''
This Sale Wiil Continue Until December 10th.
Young ladies, send your sweetheart nround; we'll surply Mil V;|
liim that vase or fancy set for the dresser. Married ladies, you
pretty dishes. They don't cost much during this sale. Give MMfr 'JM
husband a good dinner, then bring him to see us.
Come in. make your selection.. AVc'll pack them and keep nn- ;!.gSP||
til called for, or told to Bend them out.
Goal citu House f urnismi Go. I
The Big Furniture Store.
RFTK-MANTS
The Walk to School Notion Department.
Is hard enough on the Httle Ladles' Gloves, 14 button kid, ; j
ones when the snow li flying. White and Black. Shore gloves : j
Make them comfortable and K|d| 0o,ff p|eeeed Lined Fabproudly
happy with a set of our f(# Jnd s,|k
dressy child's furs. _ ..
Ladles' Muffles, TIei, Collars,
Every child's fancy pleased in
our aseortment. pln* Coml* ,lde' bae* I
We have them at prices t, and ,n' H,nik"ehie,K' >
suit every body's pocket book. ^0,e Supporters and Hosiery, '
So don't forget the children. Pillow Tops, Cushion Center '
Alto Ladles' and Mlssee' Neck Plect?- Embroidery Linens and .!
pieced and Muffs to match, at Silks.
prices to suit from $7.50 upto Alio new line of shadow out- j
$25.00 per set. Come In and fiti qaisY'S & muncle'8 ; |
let us show you our line of do- . .. . . . ....
. ?. ... Ladiei' Waists, in Silk. Wool .
pendable Furs. We are willing
to help you in making a 8E- and Cotton' from "'?? <f t0 ! I
. LECTION by information and W6.00 each.
suggestions. Come in, we welcome you.
BECKMANS
_n.r*~?~?~n-i~irir.nPii~M-i?n~~i -n~i~i~i-)fi~i~rw>i~ii~M-ii~irr?~ir> *vr*i'irr?i" " 'i***v>nfii'>n?yinMi "* i
H' V
I The Building of a Drug Business.
Square Dealing.
I Why is it that this store deserves and wins jour preference? , ,B H
l Here i* the answer in a nutabelL' I B HJ
Because we give you a rquare deal In evenrthing you buy?because B >
1 we look it Drug Store keeping from your standpoint. You find Hit out
every tine you trade here. | B E^^B
AVe believe in doing things a little bit better than ordinary,'and It it .
I by doing things a little bit better than ordinary that our business building II
is accomplished. B ''''" <8'!
There's a difference between the ordinary snd better-tharwrdlnary
store, Just as there is a difference between ths "cheap" drug store ana B
the "fair priced "drug store. The "cheap "store or the ordinary store is H
a dangerous store to pBtToohe.esperrfaDy if ft is adrug store. Yourdoctor B
knows that, and rear doctor alto /tmnru tkat Ait ttorc it a tit idtir Hate B
t.vv. - "x.*-.a?i* tm ?Mm* ti-e will Bell only drutra aJLW

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