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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, July 20, 1907, Image 1

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I AT HOME IN EVERY HOME. J* A M 4ft 4 A - ?|4* + A | ALL THE HOME NEWS FIRST. |
THE WEATHER _r#. -Wj A, A. -A jA'IA'T 7V J ^ jIIa ^Ai -A A-fr A !
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ture. || ^^WWW^W^W V"W " ^ ^ >W %/ J>! Twice ? Week For <1. |||
BllllE IX FAIKMONT, WEST VIRGINIA, SATURDAY, JULY 20, 1907. NUMBER 7&
FOUND ID-DAT
NEM MESVILLE
Was Drowned
Thursday Evening
The body ol Emory Hill wa3 found
Coogle about one hundred yards
.y.belosr^the covered bridge at Rlvesvllle
Kb?Sr1?c1c inter. Mr. Hill was last
seen at home on Thursday evening
about five o'clock, when he went oui
to teed the dickens and as he was
accustomed to go In swimming in the
. tiweit sear*the house, it is supposed
that he followed his usual custom on
Thursday evening, as his clothing and
;i -'.ahbet! were;found oif the bank. A
search was continued for the body, but
oo trace of It could be found until this
morning as above stated.
^r^eyinU"out places were found on
his head and the body was entirely
SVt^iijrian^ found. The bruises and
cuts were supposed to have been made
by stones in the river bed an<f the coroner's
Inquest resulted in a verdict of
^|*acofien& ^ drowning.
I'" "Mr.-' Hill' was one of the county's
most respected citizens and was a
blacksmith by trade. He was "52 years
of age and leavea two grown sons, the
oldest, Charley Hill, lives near Athens,
O., and the younger one, Carl, lives at
jp-ljgme; He also leaves a wlite to mourn
his death. He was a member of the
Davis Light Guards, of this, city, and
]lked by his comrades.
22 AreKiiied,
65 Injured In
AwfulWreck
? A 8PECIAL EXCURSION AND
FREIGHT "RUN TOGETHER
|C WITH TERRIBLE RESULT.
.DETROIT, July 20?A collision be tweeu
the Pere Marquette special ex$;'<iurslon
train from Ionia to Detroit
Poland a freight occurred to-day near Sajwyfe
Mich. It la reported forty or
Are dead -and as many injured.
jgjpTJiJexcursion train was crowded.
|:,?qflic!al dispatches to Pere Marquette
officials gives dead, 23; Injured, 65
llji'/flaya many are still in the wreck. Of
the Injured, many will die. Seven evifeictlrtlpn
coafihes were smashed to
;J?t;?iimle'rs. Both engines and several
^/freight cars are buried In the burning
S-vfriilhs. An eye witness' description
^.ftaeems like that of an Inferno. ' The
Iprnitmber who escaped Injury lyive bem,
('come dated from the eHect of the ten
rlble Indescribable scene.
NOT BIRD, BUT MAN
fetCHERRY PICKER GETS LOAD OF
mjr;; birdshot from hunter.
^? .."M1DBLET0N, N. T? July 20.?Seek|&tiinj'h'lWrd
flying towards a tree, Fred
Brown, a colored hunter of Montgom*
'cry, lired Into the thick foliage. He
^%d not bit the bird, but there was a
ggfepream,! and. Investigation by Brown
' .jShojfed that William NUlspaugh, who
VUCII ICO iu tap LI CO,
^"i'cil^ed the Charge in his back anj legs.
\',.P'.,'slclan attempted to pick oat
g-' ttje'ihot, tut gave'it up owing to the
'depth a . which the shot had entered
f X-'the^iJetJi.. Physicians are appreenslve
V '-of_iiood poisoning.
BANK CLOSED
FARMERS' NATIONAL BANK AT
ROYERTON, PA? CLOSED BY
ORDER OF GOVERN""
MENT.
nonncee that the Farmers' National
Bant of Royerton, Pa., was dosed to
AND PRICK
1 . 4 14 i H!_
Alexander jlvicauis
Evening at His Jr.
Ferry at Advanc
V.
Mr. Alexander McAllister, one of the
oldest and most highly respected men
of the county died last evening at seven
thirty o'clock at. his home at Benton's
Ferry. His death was due to diseases
incident to old age, he having
attained the age of ninety years.
Mr. McAllister was born In Washington
county. Pa, but moved to Marlon
county In the year 1839, where he has
resided-ever since. In the year 1817
he was united In marriage to Miss
Nancy Linn, a sister of the late ex
sheriff, Hugh R, Linn, of Marion coun-|
ty. Eleven children were born to this J
COREY AND BRIDE
HOMEWARD BOUND
HENRY SAVAGE TO OFFER FORMER
MABELLE GILMAN PART
IN "THE MERRY WIDOW."
NEW YORK, July 20?President
William E. Corey, of the United States
Steel Corporation, who went to Eu-|
rope on hie honeymoon trip after his|
marriage to Mabeile Oilman, is expect-,
ed to return to this city by the steam-,
ship Sivole Saturday.
Considerable secrecy seems to nave ^
attended the sailing ?r the Coreys.
from the other side, and It was not
until yesterday thit it became generally
known that the Steel Corporation
president and his bride were due here
Saturday.
-Surprise was,' afgWSSed In Wall
street th'eo ther day when Judge Gnry|
sailed tor murope tnai mr. vurey wusi
not already at his' post. Undoubtedly
the departure, ot his colleague in the(
steel corporation hastened the bridegroom's
return.
When Mrs. Corey arrives she will j
find waiting her a representative of
Henry Savage, who Is planning the
production of "The Merry Widow."
Mrs. Oorey will be offered the leading
part in the Savage production.
The Idea of her talcing the part originated
with Mrs. Corey herself. She
was dining at a cafe in Paris a few
nights before she left that city with
her husband and heard from a friend
some account of "The Merry Widow,"
and of friends cast for the Bpera.
"The only regret I have upon leaving
the stage is that I shall be unabla
to play a part in that production," remarked
the former actress."
An agent of Savage overheard the
remark and Mrs. Corey will be offered
the part.
HEAT IS TURNED ON.
Little Woman Blames Street car
Company for Sizzling.
NEW YORK, July 20.?The hottest
place la town waB a Gates avenue car
at noon. The few passengers, limp
and gasping, mopped weakly with soggy
handkerchiefs, and the conductor
dripping from the exertion of ringing
up bridge fares, staggered out to the
shady side of the platrorm.
"Gosh, It's hot In there," he confided
to the outside riders, "the sua on
the roof makes It fierce."
At the corner, a little woman got
on and dropped into a corner seat She
sat up straight, puzzled for a second.
Then she Jumped up.
"Mercy!" she called to the conducj
tor,' "the heat's turned on."
And It was.'
NOT AT REST
EAST MCKEE8PORT REAL ESTATE
DEALER REFUSES TO BECONSIDERED
A DEAD ONE.
PITTSBURG, July 20.?"At Rest"
"Well, I guess not. Send ror tne
reporters. I'll show Uiem I'm still a
live one."
This was the ejaculation of August
Myers, a retired real estate dealer of
East McKeesport, yesterday.
John Myers, a bartender, of Braddock,
was killed by a train at Wlliperdlng
Wednesday, and the fact fas published
In the newspapers. Letters .of
oondolence poured In to the family of
August Myers. August stood It until
some one sent.?..:^oral pillow bearing
ii CRE
.
iter Died Last
[ome at Benton's
:ed Age of 90 Years
anion, eight of whom 3arvive, namely,
William, of Eagle, Nebraska, George
C? of Bolane, Washington, uobert V/,
of Colgah, lad. Ter., Anza, Sarah aad
Nettle at home, and A. 0. McAllister,
of Benton's Ferry.
Deceased was a man of kind and
generous disposition and his friends
are numbered by the Hundreds. Until
old age incapacitated him from active
life he was prominent In county affairs
and was a shrewd business man.
Funeral services will be held on
Sunday afternoon at his late home
The remains will be laid to rest In the
Linn cemetery.
I/FRY PECULIAR
? "ww ? ?
ACCIDENT
QUITE COSTLY MISHAP AT GUYANDOTTE
BRIDGE YESTERDAY
EVENING.
HtlJTlNGTON, July 20.?As a result
of a very peculiar freight wreck
which occurred at the B. T. & O. railway
bridge at Guyandotte last evening.
the east span of the structure lies
in the river and Are from three Standard
Oil tasks which were piled" up by
the wreck, 13 warping, the steel of the
main structure which was left standing.
Just as the freight train passed Guyandotte
town and approached tne
kxt/lirn 1 f tirna /tloAATrorO't that Ana r?f
the wheels was on are and soon the
car jumpe^the track. The train was
going at a high rate of speed, causing
the coupling to break, dividing the
train. The engine, one Bat car loaded
with steel rails and Bre oil tanks
swept on and approached the bridge.
The engine, flat car and two of the
tanks gained the main structure, but
three of the tanks plied up on the viaduct,
causing the sixty-foot span to
give a-vay and fall Into the river. The
oil took Are, the flames shooting sixty
feet Into the air and illuminating the
entire district.
Fortunately no lives were lost in
the accident, which was a very expensive
one. It will be Impossible to replace
the broken bridge for several
Civs and a transfer system can not oc
Inaugura'ed owing to the fact that It
will be impossible to afford a suitable
plan for crossing the river. The accident
means that the B. & 0. will have
to abandon service between Guyandotte
snd Kenova until the damage Is
repaired. Passengers arrived on the
7*45 B. & 0. passenger train came on
to this city on the street car line.
HE CANNOT KEEP
DOWN HIS WEIGHT
PRESIDENTS EFFORTS TO REDUCE
BY OUTDOOR EXERCISE
A DISAPPOINTMENT.
NEW YORK. July 20.?In spllte o!
the open-air life he Is leading close to
nature at Oyster Bay President Roosevelt
Is said by his closest friends to
be suffering from disappointment over
his failure to lose flesh. When he arrived
In Oyster Bay the President was
hopeful that by much exercise and a
carefully regulated diet he would be
able on his vacation to greatly reduce
his weight and to put a check upon a
manifest disposition to gain flesh, despite
usual athletic exercises. He has
a well defined abhorrence of Increased
weight and would be gratified If tni
scales showed that his weight has
dropped to something like 150 or ISO
pounds, which was about the weight
of Governor Roosevelt and of Vice
President Roosevelt.
The> President's weight exceeds that
limit by more pounds man is pieamng
to him, and he Is not succeeding In his
endeavor to lteep his weight down o>
exercise and a regulation of his diet
The President actually tips tlie beam
at 180, and Is at least 20 pounds heaw
ler than he would wish to be, and his
main hope of reduction Is In a system
of fasting, which might accomplish
his purpose at the expense of'his great
physical vigor and perfect health. .
EK EACH C
WHEELBARROW
MYSTERY GROWS
9TIII nCfPfR
VI ILL ULLI kll
Post Mortem
'}.' ..
Examination Held
WHEELING, iulj^io.?The mystery
' surrounding the wieelbarrow case i?
deeper that ever. That the man did
not bang himself Is'cettaln.
Last night a post-mortem examlnh
tlon was held - overi" the body of the
i man who was foun1* hanging to fn?
handle of a wheelbarrow In alley B
Monday night The. examination took
place at the Palacemorgue and Lna.
Ackerman, Noome and Gaydash conducted
It.
At the post mortens Coroner Rogers
an/I oouaritl iinriartalfArg wnrp orGSflnt,
The first part of the body that was examined
was the neck and throat, which
were found to be ln: perfect condition,
and were not effected by the leather
belt that was around the man's neck
when found. After It was ascertained
that he did not meet death by hanging
the abdomen was examined and tne
I stomach opened. Here all efforts to
! prove the poison theory were put aside
(as no poisonous substance was found:
| The last test was feade on the skull
I and brain. There were many theories
to the effect that the man struck on
the head and then tiifng, but the skull
and brain were In' perfect condition
and no bruises of any kind were discovered.
Every portion of the body
that was examined twas found to be
in a most perfect -condition', and the
doctors stated that the dead man
was of powerful physique and was In
a healthy condition.
When the examination was over all
were puzzled, doctors and the coroner
alike. It was proved that the man did
not meet death from hanging, from
injdry to the brain or skull, or from
being poisoned.
He Is dead, but how did he come to
It? He was dead before he was hung,
in the position found, is a fact that 13
admitted by the surgeons and coroner,
but It Is not known how death was
produced. Never before In the history
of the city was there a case that
equals this one in the mystery that is
connected with it. A man found apparently
strangled to death by hanging
and yet no traces of strangulation are
found. That he was not hit on the
skull is proved by the examination of
that member. That he was not pols
- .1?It? -A
onea is Because me cxumiuauuu ul wo
stomach showed no poison. The surgeons
also say that death could not
have occurred by sunstroke or heat
prostration.
After the post mortem was completed,
Dr. Ackerman Bald:
"There is no sign of death by strangulation,
because death In this way
would discolor the face, making it
very .dark, and the eyes would be
bloodshot When the eyes were examined
they were perfectly clear. There
was not a thing wrong with the brain
and no external mark on the skull. It
Is hardly possible that the man could
have been poisoned because the stomach
when examined showed no signs.
The only way that this could be ascertained
would be to make a com,
plete analysis of this member. I can
spe no cause whatever of the man's
death, but It Is certain that he was
(Continued on Page Ftve.)
IpK
OVERTAKE THE GLIODEN TOURISTS
AS THEY START ON
DAY'S JOURNEY.
PITTSBURG, Pa., July 20. ? The
Qlldden tourists were bundled away
; from Schenley Hotel at brief Intervatt
: this morning. The first car left at 7
- o'clock. The fifty-second and last was
booked out at 8, although as a matter
. of fact half a dozen machines which
required much doctoring, did not get
*-? ?Wap Q Twa nf fho
' HWtt jf UUbK IVUQ HkkWl V. ? TT W
; early starters were la trouble soon ati
ter their departure. Car 37 collided
. bead on with an electric car at Fifth
: avenue and Craig street, and was de-'
layed two hours, The sprlngs under
W gawe ,i^^.HowwtiojI: jiwne, ..d*
[AIMS A V
Secret Meetings A
And Plans Lai<
Uprising Agai
SEOUU Korea, July 20.?Korea li
In the hands,o^ a practical dictator
General Hazegawa, commander of thi
Japanese troops. The Korea mllltar;
*'- >- ?J .U1..H.I
are m aosoiuie commauu, oiuiuuai
martial law is not formally declared
So greatly are the Japanese outnum
bered, however, that if Is a problen
whether they will be able to hold th<
people In subjection until reinforce
meats arrive. Fears of attacks an
entertained by both Japanese and al
foreigners In the country. The con
sulates at Seoul are under heavj
guard. Despite precautions, secre
meetings are being held planning <
KILLED FRIEND
Or MISTAKE
SAD ACCIDENT NEAR THOMAf
WHICH RESULTED IN DEATH
OF PRESTON FLINN.
* ?:?
CUMBERLAND, Md., July 20.?Wal
ter' Stanley silot and killed Prestot
Fllnn, his best friend, at William, W
Va., near Thomas, Thursday night,
The coroner's Jury refused to hav<
Stanley arrested, believing that h<
killed Fllnn by mistake. The met
lived in adjoining* houses. Thursday
night some one saw a man crawling
In Stanley's front yard and notlflec
the latter. Stanley yelled three tlmei
at the man to halt or he wouia snoot
Fllnn made no reply and Stanley flred
the contents of. the gun lodging lr
Fllnn's side, death ensuing.
It is thought that Fllnn was tryinf
to get Into his home in the rear way
without his wife seeing him, and thai
this was the reason for his crawllnf
along quietly. He and Stanley were
always together.
SAND LEADER
DIES A HERO
RESCUES FOUR MEMBERS OF
MEXICAN ORGANIZATION,
BUT LOSES OWN LIFE.
ATLANTIC CITY, July 20.?Dying a
hero to save the lives of four of hie
men, Colonel Augusto Azzall, leader
or the Mexican band, Gendarme Guad
alajara, which won the prize in the
big Elks' parade In Philadelphia, leau
Ing the El Paso delegation of Elks
was drowned In the surf at the foot ol
Texas avenue last evening.
The bandsman was alive whet
brought to snore, DUC expireu.m iu,
hosplta!. The other four bandamet
who were saved by the bravery ol
their leader, were brought to stare bj
the guards and recovered.
Azzall arrlv.ed here with his met
'.ate yesterday afternoon. They weni
at once to a bath house, where 45 se
cured suits and rlushed Into the rur:
for the first bath of their lives in the
ocean. The men were totally unac
qualnted with the dangerous current!
and rushed Into deep water. The lead
er was still at the head of his men
The four were directly behind him
and without a thought of his own dan
ger, Azzall fought against the current
to save them.
He reached two and managed' tc
push them back to shallow water. He
was caught In the deadly grip of the
undertow and went down. The othei
two also secured footholds on the boo
torn .and held out against the breakers
As 'Avail went, down he was seen front
the l&uch by the life guards.. By this
time they reached him he was uncon
sclous. The Texas Elks will ship the
body to Azzall'8 former home. Com
rades In the band were unable to plaj
nut,* nnj fhfl ATnantaril nlep COQ
cert wa3 not given.
BAD ODOR EXPLAINED.
ERIE, Pa,, July 20.?A horrible dis
covery was made by the police or
East Eleventh street when rooms oc
cupled by an aged couple were broker
Into. First a frightful odor met the
ofleers. Groping their way Into the
lltHe bedroom they found the corpse
of & woman. Decomposition had sei
It
ICTIM BY [
ire Being Held
i for a General
inst Japs in Korea
9 general uprising. The situation is
( more serious outside than In Seoul,
3 and no troops can be spared from
Seoul and people would meet practlcal'
ly no opposition In event of antl-for1
elgn outbreak.
i Child Dead at Monongah.
9 The Infant child of Andrew Jas
klewlcr, a Polish man, died this mornl
Ing at four'o'clock at the parents'
1 home, aged one year and 6 months.
- The remains will be laid to rest In the
t Monongah cemetery Sunday aftert
noon. Undertaker R. L. Cunningham
> In charge.
IN A HURRY TO
GOME HERE
i W. .OMAN WANTED TO-GET TO
FAIRMONT AT EARLIEST
POSSIBLE MOMENT.
- HUNTINGTON, July 20.?The Slav
t woman with a small child, whose name
. could not be ascertained, who was deposited
on the hands of the city by
! the C. ,4 0., day before yesterday, ana
! on account of her being unable to
i speak English could not make ner
' wants known, left yesterday morning
; on the B. & 0. train for Fairmont.
I She. had been taken to Thurmond
s and the agent there, finding that that
. was not the place she Intended to stop
, at, had her brought back to Huntingi
ton. it ikaBywUeyed j^at. the-woman
was stranded, and an effort was maae,
... In fact arrngements hd already been
. completed, to send her to Fairmont,
: which was the place she was bouna
! for.
! She went to the B. & 0. depot and
nade the ticket agent there under.tand
that she wanted a ticket to Fair- ,
mnnt When told the amount, she paid
for It, and left ou'the train. The C. t
9. had agreed to return the amount of
the ticket to Thurmond, which she had
bought'through mistake, but the wolan
could not be made to understand
hat If she waited a few hours It would
e given to her, and Insisted on going
CAMP LIFE FOR'
PENNSY SOLDIERS
' STATE CAMP WAS DECLARED
FORMALLY OPENED AT EIGHT
, THIS MORNING.
| TIPTON, Pa., July 20.?After a brief
ceremony at eight o'clock this morn.
ing, splendid In Its simplicity and significant,
although witnessed by only i
, a few visitors, Camp Col.. Homer L.
i Lindsay was formally declared opened.
. Prom that hour until the camp closes
[ 3aturday, July 27, mlHtary rule will ,
, be enforced and the national guard
. comprising the second brigade of the ,
i State will live and practice the military
. life. It had been expected that In
Tirtlntr rrrVirvoO loaf
UUUU1 VI UVUCIAI IIU6/I nuuav
brigade camp this la, especially elab.
orate ceremonies would mark the eat
tablishlng of the camp, but the contrary
was the case. Shortly before
S battery B took position headquarters,
soldiers of various regiments
were drawn up to "attention" In their
company streets. While the Pour I
teenth regiment band played "Stap
Spangled Banner," Old Glory was
slowly hoisted Into position on a steel
flag pole directly in front of Gen. WIj
ley's tent. While battery B saluted |
'the flag with 21 guns with dud dig- j
I nlty, all In camp stood in silence with ,
, heads uncovered. Camp routine oRl- ,
daily was In full swing almost before j
| the smoke opening salute cleared ,
away.
Three Plain One* Up.
Henry Miller, Olen Bell and Jeff
i Taylor were plain drunks that were In
the mayor'a court tbla morning. They
t are doing time at the work house,
i Chlet Shumaker and Policeman
i Price executed seven dogs last night
i Other dogs In the pounds will meet
t the same fate.
1 -vm\-)rn
'
I U; 11 III Ml I Ml I v*
o clock. .': ;
'
ashes or other suitable covering, th?
' ' ' ' " *

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