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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, August 17, 1907, Image 1

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|^?| The Only Daily Paper in West Virginia That Has DOUBLED ITS CIRCULATION and PATRONAGE in One Year ^
^pvmjTMF, SAT1/HDAY, ACGUST 17. 1807. NUMBER 102.
?? 1
ijff Dili DA 11LC
War Clouds
Are Lowering
30, Aug. 17.?Chicago's vast
inlonlsU Is ready for a symstrike
representing every
y and trade If such a step
ary to win the battle for the
erst A hundred electrlclaus
on the drainage canal have
ecelved Instructions to quit
ay. Other labor bodies are
ig similar action. It Is exa
Chicago Federation of Laneeting
to-morrow will start
0 rolling. Commissioner of
Si.virill explain the situation
esldent Roosevelt to-day.
it Gompers' report to the
Executive Council of Amerlatlon
of Labor will Include
ing" recommendations: In*.of
strike, proposal for a
1 of a: million dollars to be
lerve 'till the national strike
be raised among affiliated
jptlon Of form of general In-I
fortall-union men to refuse
graph companies v,< in any
latever.- -This may lead to
lane' strike. Commissioner
eport to the President tarn
his arrival at Washngton.
>RK, Ang. 17.? The teletrke
situation Is unchanged
. Both sides claim victory. I
makes repeated charges
legraph companies are dee
public by sending mesial!.
{ROWNED IN
JHE OHIO
LLY CROWD ENVELOPED IN
3LOOM OVER DEATH OF ONE
OF THE PARTY.
T. MARYS, Aug. J7.?William A.
ap, of the south side, Pittsburg,
i drowned off the steamer Jewell
i point opposite Willow Island bethl&clty.
The body was recovered
arday about noon. The unfortunman
was single and about 31 years
age. He and a party of friends I
down here last Week and est&b3d
a fishing camp on the Ohio side
nhnva this clty.Yind have
(enjoying their vacation very
antly.
and three other friends of their
decided to ran down to Marietta
e boat and spend the day, returnn
the evening. On the return
ley boarded the boat and he went
side the cabin on the outside of
oat and fixed ,a chair. After slt,while
he fell asleep and his comas
paid, but little attention to
fter that until the cry, 'man ov d"
aroused them, when tlje rushwhere
he had been sitting do
im gone. His comrades saw him
i Water In the rear of the boat,
ttempted to get down the life
o -rescue him, but the ropes and
wortted badly, and they lost
arable time In getting it Into the
When they were within thirty
or less of him he sank for the
her Steere Is holding an Inquest
s testimony shows that the boat
(n
officers and crew were very >cu.., H
factoid nothing toward saving the
^^'' inanjjilfe. Hie father came down qnd
--will take the body home to -day.
, The Jolly party la enveloped In
- gloom and the camp has been abandoned,
the tents folded, and members eur7
; -Trying will accompany the remains of
fd; t^belr comrade home.
Tixeurston to Morgantown.
'This evening the steamer LeRoy
|*>7 Tliili-be' here to convey an eicurslon
to Morgantown to-morrow. Those
wishing to stop at the. packet company's
park at Little Falls can do so.
The boat will stop on Its return trip
lers Tak(
: ;
egrapherf
WHISKEY BOTTLE i
TOLD THE STORY
UNFORTUNATE MAN TARRIED '
TOO LONG AT THE BOWL
AND LOST HI8 LIFE.
Millie Heutt, colored, aged 25 years, j
of Gaston mines, met death last night f
at Watson. He was struck by a train, i
mutilating bis head. Coroner Amos t
was notified of the death and he Inn (
mediately went to the scene. He t
found the man lying on his back with
his head up the river. His bat? anil
coat were lying along side of the
track. Nearby was a quart botilo
about one-third full of whiskey. Here
was the evidence that told the story.
The coroner found a wortal wound.
No other remarks of any consequence
were found. It Is thought that he was
struck by No. 4 that passes through
Watson at 10 p. m.
Undertaker Musgrave was notified
of the death and took charge of the
remains. Heutt leaves a wife and
four children. He lived dn house No.
22, Gaston. He was a brother of Bob
Heutt, who lives in the old West Vlr|
glnla Grocery building. ^
The funeral will be held to-morrow
at two o'clock at .the Baptist Chutch
In Monongah. The remains will he
taken to Monongah on the one o'clock
[car. |
ENGINEJTARTED
AND A POLE WA8 CAUGHT WHILE J
CRAWLING UNDER CAR AND
BADLY HURT.
A Pole at Anderson mines narrowly
escaped a horrible death last nlgbt c
He was crawling under a railroad car t
with a sack of floor on his shoulder, t
The etglue started the train, dragging i
him some distance. He sustained a l
badly cut knee, no bones were broken. 1
He was brought to the Miners' Hos- I
pltnl last night on the 9 o'clock car. i
PUCES A TAX j
ON BACHELORS\
NEW JERSEY TOWN FINES SIN- r
GLE MEN ?100 A YEAR FOR
NOT BEING MARRIED. 1
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Aug. 17.- r
Assessor lenry Alexander, of the s
town of Absecon, has taken It upon I
himself to Impose a tax of $100 on i
each and every bachelor In his Juris- |
diction. The first Intimation of It e
came when FratiK wamin, a wwiui^ i
bachelor, appeared before the board c
of assessors and -wanted to know why i
his txes had been raised $100. t
"Was that tax put on me because I ]
am a bachelor?" asked Hamlll Joking- ?
ly. The smile left his face when Alex- t
ander soberly and earnestly Bald: i
I "That's Just exactly why It was put
on your bill." The assessor declared <
further that bachelors should not kick
over a paltry sum like that "when they |
escaped the cares and expenses of rals- i
.tug tamllie8.", 1
Following the announcement that |
Hamlll had been practically fined for t
remaining single, other rich bachelors ,
discovered that they, too, had been:,
Aalrarl +r\ nor A*hpft this year. I 1
I nanvu ? .
and the single men of Absecon are j
talking of banding together to carry |
a protest before the State board, and, |
If necessary, to the courts.
i
Caught By Fall of Coal. ' |
Charles Pennois, miner at Lynch, ,
sustained a compound fracture of the |
leg caused by a fall of coal. The ac- |
cldent happened yesterday and he was 1
brought dovn on the ten o'clock car i
last night and taken to the Miners'
Hospital. i
Robert A. Plnkerton Dead.
NEW YORK, Aug, 17.?Robert A.
Plnkerton, head of the detective agency.
died 'August 13th aboard the steam
er Bremen en route to Europe for hie
health.
Everybody Being Good.
Thlnes were aiilet In police clrclee
lait night No prUonen were before
| toe'-mayor! 'raorn^ig.; ' j
2 Up
5' Fight?
IT FAIRMONT
< SEPTEMBER II
MANAGER OF WEST VIRGINIA
ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS LEAGUE
TO BE HERE. I
CHARLESTON# W. aV? Aug. 17.? I
jr. Wallace Longetreth, the general' <
leld manager of the West Virginia
tnti-TuberculosIs League, will visit
he following places and establish io:al
leagues during the month of Sepember:
Parkersburg, September 5.
Sistersvllie, September 7.
Wheeling, September 9.
Moundsrllle, September 10.
Fairmont, September 11.
Morgantown, September 12.
Clarksburg, September 13.
Salem, September 14.
Huntington, September 10.
Bramweli, September 17.
Bluefietd, September 18.
Charleston. September 20.
Martlnsburg, September 23.
Keyser, September 24.
Eiklns, September 25.
Buckhannon, September 26.
Weston, September 27.
There will be a meeting in Charieson
about the drat of September.
MOIINDSVILLE
MAN DRUGGED
iTRANGE CASE ATTRACTS THE
ATTENTION OP THE AUTHORITIES
IN PRISON CITV.
WHEELING, Aug. 17.?Jamea FairIlfT,
a mlddlMged man residing near
he Oien Easton coal works on Trlreenth
street, Moundsvil|e, was found
inconsclous in his back yard with his
lands tied beblnd him with his own
landkerchief. Faircllff was lying on
lis face, when by chance a neighbor
lasslng shortly before midnight oberved
the prostrate man lying on the
(round. The police were notified, and
rhen they arrived they carried Fatrdiff
into his house, where a physician
vas Immediately summoned. When
he physician arrived he was unable
o administer anything to relieve the
lattent, and at an early hour this
corning he was still unconscious. I
When questioned by Chief of Police
Jtele, 'Mrs. Falrcllff stated that her
lusband left home in the afternoon
vlth a two-dollar bill In his pocket,
ihe did not know where he was gong.
and was unable to give the police
iny information that would aid them
n ferreting out the mystery. When
learched after he had been taken into
he house. 11.75 was found in FairiIHTs
pocket and also a half pint
vhlskey bottle, not any of the conents
of which had been used. Mrs.
ihircllff Identified the handkerchief
is that of her husband, and rememlered
seeing him when he put it In
lis pocket before leaving home.
Looking at the case in all Its phasis.it
is a very unusual one. '
The only, theory advanced by the
jolice was that FalrcliS had possibly
leen to Wheeling and that he arrived I
lome on 'a late car; that he perhaps
fell In with bad company or was*overaken
by thugs bent on robbery. It is
possible, they believe, that FatrclllI
was drugged and taken to his home,
where the -intention was to rob him,
hut that the thieves, after preparing '
for the nefarious deed, might have
seen frlghtenM away, leaving meir
victim to die la bis own yard. A restlent
ot the neighborhood states that
he saw two strangers coming from the
direction of the Falrcllff home short;
ly after 11 o'clock. They were walkInk
along, not engaged in any particular
conversation and acted aB though
they were studying about something.
Fatrcllff Is not a drinking man, and
the neighbors say he Is not In the
habit of mixing In bad company. At
an early hour this morning he was
Btlll In an unconscious state, and the
physicians are working over him.
They are unable to arrive at any conclusion
as to what was used to stuplfy
the man, and a careful examination
of his person did not disclose any
evidences ot lnjortes Inflicted by <
blows or otherwise. 1
sg
bivil War Veteran
Regains E/esight
PARKER3BURG, Aug. 17.?As the
:lock struck the hour oC twelve Satjrdar
nfeht. David Rlssel, ot the
South Side, a-blind veteran of .the
2Iyil War, whose last four years had
jeeh spent in total d&ikness, was sudJenly
awakened, and was astounded
to And that In the dimness of his
oom he couid see.
Hurriedly he lighted a match and
o his utter amazement he found that
lis vision wais clear/ He -could see far
letter than man# men of younger
/ears, and since then his vision has
seen clear and unclouded.
This strange humrin phenomenon
lecaine known to a few intimate
.'rlends In the neighborhood Sunday,
when he enjoyed a walk In the light j
'or the first time In four years. He,
tame over to the South Side bridge,'
ind as he walked by his old acquaint-1
tnces nodded to them and called them
>y name to their utter astonishment.
Several who had known him as an old.
lecreplt blind veteran, who could get
irouad only by the use of a cue In
lis home, and In the road or street,
tulded by the hands .of his sons, rubied
their own eyes to make sure they
vers not asleep and dreamlngr
Capt. Hlssel claimed that during the
:ivl!' War he had sustained Iniurles
which impaired his sight and
vhlch four years ago were responsible
or Its complete loss. As the result
if proven total blindness, for the past
hree "years he has^recelved a pension
>f $50 per monih".'^'
"I suppose I will lore my pension
10w," said he to a friend. "But I
voulJn't trade my eye slgiit tor fifty
Imej fifty dollars a month.
"I cannot begin to describe how
itrange I felt whin I awoke from
ileep and blindness at the same time,
ind found that I could see once again.
Strangely I knew nearly every one I
lad known before. I became so aciuslomed
to blindness that Instinct,
>r something much like It, told me
rhen any one was near me, and even
vho It was. I could tell If one of my
ions was rn the room with me, and if
my one left I could tell who It was.
"Now that Instinct helps me to recignlze
people who In four years might
tare changed so in appearance that
would not know them." *
During his long affliction RJssel has
Ired off of his pension, and occasionally
has come to the city, being led
ly one or the other of his sons, who
vere his almost constant companions.
He wag more helpness than most blind
jeople because of having been strlcksn
late in life.
Neighbors in the vicinity of Lubeck
tvsnue, who hare been convinced of
he transformation, are wonder-strickin.
Out of curiosity Mr. Rtssel may
? Induced to undergo an examination
>y an expert occullsL
It is said that no treatment for bis
illndness was ever taken and conseluently
the nature o( It was not unieretood.
The case Ib said to be one
)f the most remarkable on record.
MILK FAMINE IS
THREATENED
MEW YUKrv nAvmu n?nu umc
TO 8UPPLY MILK FOR THE
PEOPLE.
NEW YORK. Aug, 17.?this city Is
n serious danger of a milk famine.
Jrery effort Is being made to keep up
lie supply of milk until after the hot
leather, as thousands of babies and
lick among the poor are practically
lependent upon the milkman for their
Ires. One milk association will meet
it once to consider raising the price,
tfllk wagons to-day said that the passees
are dry and there Is little for the
tows to eat . Milk Is bringing three
road stations throughout the State. I
"Coming Man" In SeMlon.
RIDGWAY, Pa., Aug. 17.?The third
mnual State convention of the coming
nea of Amerioa Is In session, here.
C. H. Brown.
WILLINVESTI
IS DOVENER
A CANDIDATE ?
RUMOR IN CIRCULATION ABOUT
WHEELING CONCERNING FORMER
CONGRESSMAN.
WHEELING, Aug. 17.?An Interesting
rumor was In circulation yesterday
In political circles to the effect
that Former Congressman B. B. Dovener
Is considering entering the race
ALEX THORN.
Class No. 4,
HALLIE MORROW.
Class No. 5,
FLORENCE JACK.
Class No. 6,
JOHN J. BRENNBN.
A new name for the head of the roll
of honor to-day Is what the friends of
Paull M. Hawkins will most appreciate
In the announcements of the day.
On yesterday he leaped as If by magic
over the heads of several of his competitors
and landed In second place.
To-day he displaces Freddy Eddy, who
has sturdily maintained the lead for
several days and Paul now has to his
credit over 53,000 votes. Many of
his friends who were helping him
doubted his ability to attain first rank
In the contest and they now express
a willingness to further assist him
since he has proven his prowess as
vote getter.
To-night will bring forth the combined
accumulation of votes of many
days' work and the vote counting for
the next 48 hours after the last ballot
Is received at 8 o'clock this evening in
the special contest for the week will
be the most strenuous task the contest
manager has had to encounter
but every effort will be made to have
the result announced and the special
prizes awarded Monday evening.
In district number two some big
changes are made in the slate and Miss
Claudia McNeely has gone from fifth
TOUR OF THE WORLD
Will Be Honeymoon Trip For Charles
Emory Smith and Bride. NEW
YORK, Aug. 17.?A tour of
the world win ne me aonejmoou trip
of Charles Emory Smith, editor- of the
Philadelphia Ledger, and former postmaster
general, whose engagement to
Miss NetUe Nichols was announced today.
Coal Operators Here,
J. B. Swing and J. H. Field, coal
operators of Unlontown, were here
jresterdar on their return from Lum"berport,
where they located a tipple
GATE STATE II
-> itfv.y**. * XT +M. 'v,i -=;-v
MARION COUNTY
8UNDAYSGHOOLS
PROGRAMME FOR ANNUAL MEETING
OF COUNTY ASSOCIATION
IS ABOUT READY.
MANNINOTON, Aug. 17?Dr.W. R.
Andrews, of this place, secretary of
tbe Marlon County Sunday School Association,
has the programme for the
annual convection of the association
for the KepiiDi.can congressional nomination
next fear. When Capl. Dovener
was seen last night he declined
to conSrm or decs the story, but admitted
that he had been approached
by some of his political and personal
friends with his candidacy In view.
Further than (his be had nothing to
say on the subject If Captain Dovener
becomes a candidate again an interesting
race would be In evidence
In this county," without taking into
consideration what might develop in
the other counties, as Congressman
William P. Hubbard, now entering his
first term, will be In the field for renomlnatlon.
PAUL M. HAWI
ROLL OF
A HEAVY VOTE WILL BE CAST
TO-NIGHT.
MISS CLAUDIA McNEELY, OF MANNINGTON,
GOES TO THE HONOR
ROLL (N DISTRICT TWO-A NEW
CANDIDATE ENTERS WITH A
BIO VOTE FROM MANNinuiura.
ROLL OF HONOR.
District No. 1,
PAUL M. HAWKINS.
District No. 2.
CLAUDIA McNEELY.
District No. 3,
FORB8T SPRINGER
Class No. 1,
MABEL MERRIFIEIJ),
Class No. 2,
GBORGIE ICE. )
| Class No. 3.
to be held at Amos on September 12
and 13 about ready for publication. A
meeting of the executive committee
of the association whs held here this
week and plana were about completed
for the annual meet. Dr. A .J. Hlatt.
State president, and W. C. Shaffer, 1
State secretary, are on the programme
for addresses, and leading ministers J
of the county will also take part. Miss
Martha Graham, of Wheeling, State
superintendent of the elementary :
work, will speak both days of the. con- -j
ventlon. The town of Amos la arrang- (
lng to entertain a large number of
delegates.
KINS HEADS i
HONOR TODAY i
1?:?: i
place on the list and now heads the (
honor roll for that district dlsplac- '
lng Miss Parsons, of Rlvesvllle, and ,
Miss Frances A. Slater, of High (
street, Mannlngton, has Just entered
the race, and goes on the list the first
day with 2,250 voter to her credit, j
taking second place and makes the
matter of the distribution of (he two '
diamond rings for that district take on J
a speculative aspect. Miss Martha
Stewart, of Farmlngton, continues to
Increase her rote dally, and some good ,
work may be expected from that sectlon
In a few days. The race now Is j
just starting in the second district (
and it Is not too late for new entries ,
and one may be expected at any time .
as there remain two weeks yet In
which to see who has the moat loyal |
friends and who stands the highest (
In the estimation of the citizens of |
Lincoln, Mannlngton and Pawpaw dls- j
trtcts. The decision Is left entirely (
with the people of these three dlstrtcts
and the contest will be watched (
with much anxiety from other parts (
of the county.
Other Mannlngton candldnt/es for ]
the honors In the class prizes are taking
fine rank In the contest and it Is ,
not Impossible yet for some of them f
to outclass the other worthy corapetl- ,
tors In the several classes. '
,
TWO 8PECIAL PRIZE8
. FOR THIS WEEK. ^
Another Diamond Ring and 1
(20.00 In Gold.
*-J I
Taertt Will tic awtirueu u c ,IC"clal
prize to the person turning {
In the most votes, or showing (
the largest Increase in rote this (
week In either of the three districts
a handsome diamond ring.
And to the party turning In the j
most votes or snowing toe larg- \
est Increase la either ot the six
classes there will be awarded a
twenty dollar gold piece.
.All votes added to the'list this
week will be counted on the special
prizes and the vote trill be
received for this purpose up until
8 o'clock p. m. on Saturday,
August 17, the result to be published
next Monday evening.
Coupon votes will be allowed
for this purpose as well as certificate
votes. j"
: :? !
VERY BADLY HURT.
John L. 8tubbs Seriously Injured at
Gaeton Mine. t
John -L. Stubbs, colored, driver at S
Gaston, was caught yesterday noon 1
between the end of a mine car and i
the face of the coal and wis crushed 1
through the abdomen and hips. Stubbs (
had put the car in the, room and had 1
unhitched the horse, but the car kept s
moving. He was brought to the Miners'
Hospital. He Is very painfully
hurt.
*U.. I. VmhI, 1
VIk/ . Jj I
: "TTTjni
" ' r
inference with Governor William H.
D. Dawson, Senator E. W. McKown.
thalrman of the Joint legislative comnlttee
to Investigate the State Inatt^
utlons, announced that It has been
irranged for the committee to meetNH
September 18. This ictlon
lecause It is necessary that some arrangement
be made to defray "the ex-' I
venses of Oh 'investjiiwh,^Governor;;:^
Dawson having vetosd the-jBMW^^^B
Ion carried in the revolution creatingH
he committee. t.y.
* -
This committee twowtvCTWBwMM|
he sole purpose of ltfestl#itfcg tutyfl
tharges of alleged graft at the instl
ainlster oaths,'summon witnesses and
:ompel the production of documents
El assistants such reasonable comMoM/xrs
UA a 1 v?*r tho mm.
;cLidciuivu ao uiaj?cc aauu ^ >uv ?
nlttee, which amounts shall be paid
iy warrants drawn by the auditor on
he State treasury from moneys not
itherwlse approprtitsd."
It Is conceded that all of the State
nstitutions are well conducted but It
s possible that gome reforms can ho
naugurated \>j the use of more moJirn
methods. There
ientlment that all the InstKutlons Mi
ilaced in charge of one controlling
oard and the lni^tig|ttttSf^nm^|
ee will sound public* opinion on this <;d
s well aa many othor Important que*
Governor Dawson vetoed the appro
irlatlon for this committee for the
eason that It vrsi indefinite a? to .
mount. This action was not takes
iy the executive on account of any
pposltion to the creation of the comnlttee
as hp^jrtated at the time that
ro vised: ' .' *^g?JsH
The member* ot the committee ar?.IS
is follows: Senator E. W. McKown,
f Roane, chairman; Senator Gray
el, Jefferson,a nd Delegate C. M. . J
tenographer,
* *e" ^nowf, I
rayer, passed through the city this
uree nuuarea aua iwiu m UUw?nr ^
*iu amp luriu

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