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The Fairmont West Virginian. (Fairmont, W. Va.) 1904-1914, August 20, 1907, Image 1

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VOLUME IV. FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1907. NUMBER 104
1
PRESIDENT ROOSEVE
A CLEAR EXPOSITION OF PAST AND
PRESENT CONDITIONS IN AMERICA
NO INDIVIDUAL, NO CORPORATION OBEYING THE LAW HAS ANYTHING
TO FEAR FROM THE.ADMINISTRATION, SAYS THE
Sp PRESIDENT, BUT HIS PURPOSE IS TO STAMP OUT
^iPROyiNCETOWN, Mass., Aug. 2u.?President Roosevelt spoke as fol'jvlows
here to-day on the occasion of the laying of tie corner stone of the
gpiTHgrin) Memorial Monument:
BP*-:-'It Is not too much to say that the event commemorated by the monup&tnent
which we have come here to dedicate was one of those rare events
Ep&wbleii 6an in good faith be called of world importance. The coming hithBfe:/?r.40t
the Puritan three centuries ago shaped the destinies of this contii-.htmL
and therefore profoundly affected the destiny ol the whole world. Men
?p?'5>''tffr6iher races, the Frenchman and the Spaniard, the Dutchman, the Gerthe
Scotchman, and the Swede, made settlements within what Is now
United States, during the colonial period of our history and before the
^Declaration of Independence; and since then there has been an ever-swelllag
immigration from Ireland >nd from the mainland of Europe; but it
jlll^'vWaS'the Englishman who settled in Virginia and the Englishman who settled
in-Massachusetts who did most in shaping the lines of our national
The Puritan's Tasw Was to Conquer a Continent
can not as a nation be too profoundly grateful for the fact that the
?&:>j?uritan' has stamped his Influence so deeply on our national life. We need
Eg?jdsave but scant patience with the men who now rail at the Puritan's faults.
SafeWey were evident, of course, for It is a quality of strong natures that their
Plj^tt&ings, like their virtues, should stand out in bold relief; but there is noth-'.y.-'ing
easier than to belittle the great men of the past by dwelling only on the
Sffi/pmts where they come short of the universally recognized standards of the
"p&dnt Men mast be judged with reference to the age In which they dwell,
and the work they have to do. The Puritan's task was to conquer a contift
ttSBt;- not merely to overrun It, but to settle it, to till it, to build upon it
a'high industrial and social life; and, while engaged in the rough work of
v> ' taming the shaggy wilderness, at that very time also to lay deep the immovy'
* ; able foundations of our whole American system of civil, political, and rellg|&|t
tons liberty achieved through the orderly process of law. This was the
; work, allotted him to do; this Is the work he did; and only a master spirit
-fr. ? " tiMkn Mtilri have done IL
I Some Thing* We Have Gained and Some We Are In Danger of Losing.
We have traveled far since his day. That liberty of conscience' which
a demanded for himself, we now realize must be ae freely accorded to otha
as It Is resolutely insisted upon -or ourselves. The splendid qualities
rblch he left to his children, we other 'Americans who are not of Puritan
lood also "toim as our heritage. You. sons of the Puritans, and we, who
rey descended from races whom the Puritans would have deemed alien?
a are all Americans together. We all feel that same pride in the genesis,
i the'history, of our people; and therefore this shrlae of Puritanism Is oae
t which we all gather to pay homage, no matter from what country our anestors
sprang.
' We have gained some things that the Puritan had not?we of this genration,
we of the twentieth century, here in this great Republic, but we are
lso in danger of losing certain things which the Puritan had and which we
an by no manner of means afford to lose. We have gained a Joy of lifrig
which he had not, and which it Is a good thing (or every people to have
nd to develop. Let us see to it that we do not lose what is more Imortant
still; that we do not lose the Puritan's iron sense of duty, his unending,
unflinching will to do the right as it was given him to see the
ght. It Is a good thing that life should gain in sweetness, but ouly proided
that It does not rose In strength. Ease and rest and pleasure are
jod things, but only If they come as the reward of wort well done, of a
?d light well won, of stronge effort resolutely made and crowned by high
ahlevement. The life of mere pleasure, of mere effortless ease, Is as igable
for a nation as for an Individual. The man Is but a poor father who
aches his sons that ease and pleasure should be their chief objects in life;
te woman who Is a mere petted toy. Incapable of serious purpose, shrinkg
from effort and duty, Is more pitiable than the veriest overworked
-udge. So he Is but a poor leader of the people, but a poor national advlser,
who seeks to make the nation in any way subordinate effort to ease, who
fl' , would teach the people not to prize as the greatest blessing the chance to
do any work, no matter how bard, if it becomes their duty to do It. To
the sons of the Puritans tt Is almost needless to say that the lesson above all
others which Puritanism can leach this nation Is the all-importance of the
resolute performance of duty. It we are men we will pass by with contemp;
; tuous disdain alike the advisers who would seek to lead us into the paths
HS-v- of ignoble ease and those who would teach us to admire successful wrongly
: doing. Our Ideals should be high, and vet they should be capable of achieveV
meat In practical fashion; and we are as little to be excused If we permit
our Ideals to be tainted with what Is sordid and meaa and base, as If we alI.
low oar power of achievement to atrophy and become either incapable of
y effort or capable only of such fantastic effort as to accomplish nothing of
permanent good. The true doctrine to praech to this nation, as to the indigo
vldnals composing this nation, Is not the life of ease, but the life of effort,
i, If It were In my power to promise the people of this land anything, I would
ry not promise them pleasure. 1 would promise them that stern happiness
which comes from the sense of having done In practical fashion a difllcult
v'.iywork which was worth doing.
. Problems Shift From Generation to Generation But Spirit Remains Same.
. -The Puritan owed his extraordinary success la subduing this continent
I'jjjjuni making it the foundation for a social life or ordered liberty primarily
y ,- to the feet that he combined In a very remarkable degree both the power
^>;^or.:inmmuai initiative, or wairidnai seii-neip, ana me power 01 ucuug m
i^S/eomblnation with his fellows; and that furthermore he Jojned to a high
gEf^tiwtrt that shrewd common sense which saves a man from the besetting
gjxfeihi* of the visionary and the doctrinaire. He was stout hearted and hard
?0iiioaded. He had lofty purposes, but he had practical good sense, too. He
^^i^could hold' his own In the rough workaday world without clamorous Insistgj?fe?
enceupon being helped by others, and yet he could combine with others
whoever it became necessary to do a job which could not be as well done
ispt'-iftj My one man individually.
Sfsglpisp? -These were the qualities which enabled him to do his work, and they
are the very qualities which we must show In doing our work today.
-'."..There is no use in our coming here to pay homage to the men who founded
this, nation unless we first ol all come in the spirit of trying to do our work
they did their work in the yesterdays that have vanished. The
problems shift from generation to generation, but the spirit in which they
must be approached, if they are to be successfully solved, remains ever
u the same. The Puritan tamed the wilderness, and built up a free govern3?;;'v
went on the stump-dotted clearings amid the primeral forest His descend^v.-ants
most try to shape the life of our complex Industrial eivilliation by new
jfc t i deviHes, by new methods, so u to achieve in the end the same results of justice
and fair dealing toward alL He cast aside nothing old merely for the
ke of innovation, yet he did not hesitate to adopt anything new that would
save his purpose. When'he planted his commonwealths on this ragged
art he faced wholly new conditions and he had to devise new methods od
meeting,them. So we of today face wholly new conditions in our social and
industrial,life. We should certainly not adopt any tow scheme for grappling
sass-^sr^B ?
LT TALKS
"secretary It
I Tt? T j14.1^ n:~i n?4-.
? 1 lie I^ULIC UU1 VUU
Henry Wagner ]
Of a Forme
Information reaching the West Vlr-1
gtnian after press time yesterday established
the surmise published In
. Monday evening's paper Identifying
Rev. R. B. Whitehead, former pastor
of the M. P. SChurch in this city, with
the Rev. Whitehead, of Turnerrllle.
Pa.. In whose family a horrible crime
was perpetrated on Saturday. Rev.
Whitehead Is now located at Tumervllle.
Pa., just out of Youngstown.
Ohio. Until recently he was located
at a small town out of Pittsburg. His
unfortunate daughter whose name fs
given as Anne Is thought to be Miss
Alma Whitehead, the youngest child
In the family when they left here more
than ten years ago. The facts have
brought the terrible tragedy close
home to Fairmont people and the utmost
sympathy Is expressed for the
entire family In the terrible Incident
The Send has confessed to the
crime, as the following dispatch 'relates:
MEADVTLLE, Pa., Aug. 20.?Cringing
and quaking In momentary expectation
of being torn from the hands
of Deputy Sheriff McMillan by the
crowd which formed a gauntlet from
the jail to -Magistrate Powers' ofllce
yesterday afternoon, Henry W. Wag- '
ner, the brutal assailant of Miss Alma 1
Whitehead, Improved the first opportunlty
to plead guilty, anxious to get
back to the security of the Jail.
The expressions Wagner heard as
ni iaii iimn
dlauk nnnu
AflllST?l
UNABLE TO FUffltf^llKfeofc BAlL 1
*>,' HE MU8T LANQUI8H IN
PRISON.
GRAFTON, W. Va.. Aug. 20. ?
Marablta Gluseupe. the alleged
"Black Hand" artist, who was arrested
here a fear days ago. charged with
attempting to holdup Joseph GritJa.
an employe of the Baltimore and Ohio,
for <75, has ben held an answer to :
the grand Jury in the sum of <2.000.
which he has been unable to secure,
and he is now In the county jail. Since
the arrest of this man a systematic
hunt for the principal in the holdup
came has beea made by the officers,
and they have failed to get him. The
fellow was tracked to Rowlesburg.
but before the officers got there both
he and his wife, both of whom had
been staying there for a short time,
had decamped, after stealing a mileage
hook and a watch from a fellow
Italian.
BUMPED THE STREET
i
YOUNG MAN HAD EXPERIENCE
HE WOULDN'T CARE TO
HAVE REPEATED.
While attempting to alight from a
rapidly moving car last night out locust
avenue a young man met with
rather a painful Injury. The young
man lives at Bell Run station and got
on what he supposed was the Bell Run
car. which proved to be the vrong
car, however, learning his mistake, he
attempted to jump off the car between
streets. When he struck the ground
his head would persist In going faster
then his feet and as a result he landed
on his face on the brick parement
He was more or less bruised up but
received no serious Injury.
BEEFTRUST
SECURES ANOTHER RIVAL WHOSE
CAPITAL WILL BE ADDED
OCTOBER FIRST.
NEW YORK. Aug. 20.?The beef
trust captured another rival, securing
control of tie Interest in New Tart
Butchers' Dressed Heat Co it Is captallzed
for a million and will be merpwith
trust October first
<
Mr. accj Mrs. Frank Ewan and Mis*
. Rattle, Martin are expected home to'
Atht' from a two weeks' riatt at At|
tantic City and PMladaipl^ ^ , ^
OF STATI
[FT SOUNDS RE
aged By j
[s the Daughter
;r Fairmont Pastor
he passed to and from the prison Indicated
the temper of the crowd, and 7
it would hare taken little to start a
lynching. Wagner will probably attempt
no defense when he comes to
trial at the September (tnarter sessions.
He has already made complete y
separate confessions to Sheriff Marshall
and Deputy SherlJ McMillan in
addition to pleading guilty before the
committing magistrate. Wagner in j
his confession has described in detail
his attack on Miss Whitehead In the
public road near her home at Turnersvine;
how he carried her into the
woods and all that happened before
he released her at daybreak. He admits
everything, offering only itr palliation.
"I don't know why t did it." !
Wagner Is a German !7 years old.
about five feet nine inches tall, very
cadaverous looking, weighs about. 1S<1
pounds, hps dark brown hair, smoo'h
florid face, very prominent nose and
right eye missing. He is a typical
tramp in dress and general appearance
and bestial In feature and action.
He claims to have been born in Elizabeth,
Westmoreland county. Pa., and
to have followed mining tome and recently
worked In a foundry in Loralne.
Ohio. The maximum penalty for his
crime is 11.000 fine and IS years' Imprisonment
The report from Turnersville is that
MI** tXThftahoftjl will rotvirpr
DIAMOND QUEEN j
'W*' t
OWNERSHIP OF OlSlONDSTO BEING
CONTESTED IN WASHINGTON
COURT.
It
WHEELING, Aug. 20,-Bessie Criswell
Burton, the "Diamond Queen," ^
who recently stirred op a big sensa- j
tlon In this city by betas brought Into .
the courts and the limelight ot pubUclty
on a charge of having stolen diamonds
from H. E Hiilman to the val- g
ue of J2.100, went on trial yesterday ^
morning In the criminal court of Washington
county at Washlnston, Pa. h|
It will be remembered that Mrs. Bur- .
si
ton was acquitted of the charges
brought against her here. The public _
is familiar with the (act that C. E.
Gllmore, of Washington. Pa., then ap- I
peared on the scene, It Is said, and I
purchased the diamonds from Mrs.
Burton, who later Journeyed to
Washington, where she regained possession
of the jewels In a manner that
Mr. Gllmore alleges was robbery. ?
The "Diamond Queen" was placed
under arrest by the Washington police,
and Chief Delaney, obtaining the diamonds,
placed them In a bank In that
city. Mr. Hlllmau then appeared in
Washington, and by Instituting replev- H
In proceedings and furnishing bond. P1
he procured the gems. 11
Attorneys Mcllbaine and Williams j*
yesterday appeared (or Mr. Gllmore
and filed a petition alleging that the "
replevin was not legal and that the
mwle In the hands nf an nffirer mtild
George C. Mcintosh, editor and general
manager o( the Mall, who vent p,
to his home in Fayettertile Saturday pi
night as usual, has reelpned and had di
his name taken from the top ot the ai
editorial column. The cause ot reslg- S
nation was_ not tyled. but it is un- t<
derstood' tfiat .the it'ockholders da- ei
55 right:
PUBLICAN KB
Miss France
Slater Nc
In!
WO CHANGES IN ROLL OF HON-*
CR TODAY?MR. ALEX THORN,
THE RAILROAD MAN, GOES
DOWN BEFORE MR. RAY ARNETT
OF THE TRACTION FORCE.
/Ill Dandy Yet Go to Mannington? I
"It Would be a Shame If He Does," >
Sift Fairmont Young Lady.
4 '
ROLL OF HONOR. | '
j District No. 1, j 1
FREDDY EDDY.
| District No. 2, 1
I FRANCES A. SLATER. I
j. District No. 3. !
| FOREST SPRINGER.
| Clare No. 1, j ,
MABEL MERRIFIEID. | ,
Class No. 2, j |
GEORGIE ICE. I ,
Class No. 3. j ]
RAY ARNETT. 1
Class No. *, ,
HALL IE MORROW. ,
Class No. S, t
FLORENCE JACK.
Class No. 6,
JOHN J. BRENNEN. '
J
The process of getting doable action j
l all certificates, or two rotes for
se this week, has been a great boon
i many who have not yet exerted '
not be replevined. 11
Attorney P. F. Birch, tor Mr. Hill- 61
man, contended that the protest of Mr. 31
Gllmoro's attorneys to too late, and "
asked for a demurrer, vhlch the court a
granted. A further hetring will be a
given Mrs. Burton Wednesday, the '
Mth lost
ei
M'lNTOSH QUITS :
RESIGNS THE GENERAL MANAGERSHIP
OF THE CHARLESTON
MAIL T
CHARLESTON, W. Va.. Aug. 20.?
mlr best-efforti-, and changes are be- '
10, Bade gtt,ajqpg the Hat Several (
id the time to do any real work have '
iji.oot Jbooks of certificates and the
>tej are coming In very rapidly.
Tvo changes are made today In the '
ill of honor, one in district number
fo, whereby Miss Frances Slater, a '
:* candidate, goes to the bead of the E
it; the other change Is in class num:r
three where Mr. Ray Arnett dls- 1
laces 'Alex Thorn, who yields his c
ad for the first time since the bennlng
of the contest. I
Miss Slater has gone into the con- t
st In earnest and there has not been i
day since she entered but what she r
is dene some good work and it alt t
io*s up very plainly now in the nice i
ate she_ has accumulated to this c
!IT flFF AN EAR I.
? ? WB >
WHILE FIGHTING
IKINS HOTEL MAN CHEWS AN- '
OTHER'S EAR ABOUT OFF
AND DISAPPEARS.
ELKDfS. W. Vs.. Aug. 20.?Charles
arr, until yesterday one of the pro- i
rtetors of the Hotel Gassaway. of
lis city, Is apparently a fugitive from i
istlce, having In a flght with James i
urns, formerly.the steward at the t
ime hotel, bitten off the greater part J
I Burns' ear. s
Bad feeljng has existed between the s
ro men since Burns' resignation sev- '
ral months ago, when he tried to per- '
ude the cooks to leave as well. Harr i
tiled Barns out of a barber shop 1
jout 9 o'clock yesterday morning, and I
Iter trying to kick Burns in a vital 1
?[, preceded to bite off his ear.
Harr has not been seen since the
plsode. Armed with a warrant the
lief of police searched every room In
le hotel without finding Harr, who,
li L-1. J I.' - I.U
is uvucvcu, uao iciv iuku.
WILL ARBITRATE
HOUGHT THE TELEGRAPH COM- ?
PAN IE8 WILL AGREE TO 1
MAKE TERMS. 1
NEW YOKK, Aug| M.?he belief >
reralls here that the telegraph com- t
inles will arbitrate deaplte their '
eclaratioo that they hare nothing "ro i
rMtrate. Chas. P. Nettl, United a
tales Labor Commissioner, expected t
) arrlre to-morrow to- meet Gomp- (
ri, John "Mitchell and Daniel J. Keefe,
MdbOn ofthe Americas Federation of
5 AND Til
(NOTE IN NOTi
I i
> 3
>w Leads
Mannington
time. There ere others, howerer, in
Wannington who will contest erery
Inch of ground In that district, and to
whom the honors and prizes will go is
the matter molt discussed by the
Friends of the sererai candidates In
district number two. Mis3 Parsons,
Dt TUvesville, also continues to increase
her vote and from the activity
that has just begun In that district,
ind from the fact that a double rote Is
allowed all this week, many even beleve
"that the pony outfit will yet be
taken away from Fairmont by <he
tfannlngtoalana. One young lady said
resterday. "(1 would be a sbame to
lee the pony go outside of Fairmont."
Uias. Mabel Merrilleld, of district
lumber three, Is another who recog
lizeo <oe importance 01 wor&iug taw
reck while rotes are so liberally slowed,
and the voting certificates her
friends are turning In on subscriptions
tare glren her s good start up the
1st and It some good work la not done
within a few days it will be no surprise
to see a change In the roll of
lonor In district number three.
A noticeable feature or to-day's rote
s the handsome Increase made by Art
Kern, who does not seem to be the
east bit daunted by the large lead
issumed by his competitors, who competed
for the special prize last week.
It will be quite a surprise to the
all road boys to see that their favorte,
Mr. Alex Thorn, has given up his
fead- to Mr. Ray Arnett, of the fracJon
company Jtell kMJDfc
hat the traction employes have had
heir mind made up for several Jays
o bring this about and there Is yet
mother of the same force, Mr. John
lartley, who will contend with Mr.
tinett for flrtt position, he also representing
the Triction forces.
Mr. Arlle Sekterfleld and W. R.
tlggs continue to receive a good share
if the railroad rote.
Several of the candidates are workng
out of town today and while they
?ve made an effort to conceal their
novements, still their going has been
eported and some surprises will be
he result of this "gum shoe" cam>aign
In the outer precincts of the
xrjnty.
IAPAN WANTS
THE PHILIPPINES
REPRESENTATIVES VISIT BERLIN
to get money iu but on
TAKE OUR ISLANDS.
BERLIN, Aug. 20?Despite denials
here seems no doubt that Japan Is
rylng to raise money with a view to
fHilring the Philippines. From two
eliable sources comes the assurance
0 Berlin that representatives of eight
lapanese banks have been commissioned
to float a flfty-mllllon bond isiue
In Germany. Financiers with
shorn the negotiations were made
1 ere Informed that the funds were JeIred
to bring America's Insular ooslesslfns
under Mikado rulet.J Just
iow the islands were to change hands
ias not made dear.
JOHN MITCHELL
rHINKS THE LABOR CLASSES ARE
IN BETTER CONDITION THAN
EVEN BEFORE.
WASHINGTON, Aug 20?John Mlthell.
president of the United Mine
Workers, today said lig did sot Delete
the Industrial conditions today
rarranted the lack of confidence that
eems to exist In some business quarers
IMtchell said the only thing that
ronld bring a panic In his optnoa
ronld be over prodncton "Generally
peaking, the labor classes are la beter
condition that ever," declared Kithell
i
..Second Edition of Daughter of the
twtve JOT, opto
TRUSTS!
night. .The
pie were - unable to Zft lit The.sjH|
dress was notable from the bct ttjttfl
by Governor Herris, of Ohio, at the
outburst of aoDlnse.
. . CcJiBlflMMUM
Secretary Tall said In part:
which prevailed In railway manigepower.
Tills ww floaeby thepanajnJ
orders by providing' that they shall go
made, unless rjjpended by an or..1- ^ of
oil pipe-line companies are brouglr
as common carriers. The ac gi\
commission power to lUr'tfc- r
on the Journey ltd"to rejnlr^
be performed lor ev
and extending them to anotbe^l^^^fl
Imposing varying charges Tor them. S
companies bare been able In the piitJB
to make them a comvenleni Insa^^^H
for discrimination. , Th?i.nc?' I
quires the publlMtlon of rateatjj^^^B
for such Incidental servlws Rallro
are compelled to famish c.. ith >ut
discrimination for theL'ffl
and with the full consent of, the ralJrtB
roads and that
was the eltmlnMlonvttjilih^S^B^^B
penalty for tu)ast!t&iii{HMmB*^
The abolltton ol Imprisonment, as a
possible Density, was nhtbttSU^H
Experience has shown that a mere fine
Is generally not enough to deter a corportion
from relation of the la* because
It then becomes a matter of ;
mere fbnalnett speculation. TheSentH
taruiiiiMt of two or three
pnsoomeoi 011*0 or mrw prummiuh
, J, 1^?m a tnufwn

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