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The Brownsville daily herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1897-1910, April 20, 1905, Image 1

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Brownsville
VOL. XIII, NO. 250.
iROWSVUXE, TEXAS, THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1905.
SINGLE COPIES, 5 CENTS.
i
If
r
McDonald's Department Store jj
l o b kHI I I
m m t m w m
At Our Prices on Ice Cream Freezers and Gasoline Stoves
ICE CREAM FREEZERS
2- quart Ice Cream Freezers, each,
4 quart Ice Cream Freezers, each,
6 quart Ice Cream Freezers, each,
8 quart Ice Cream Freezers, each,
10 quart Ice Cream Freezers, each,
GASOLIiNE STOVES
Gasoline Stoves at, each, - - . -$3,50,
$5.00, $5.50, $7.00, $9.00 and $12.50
Oil Stoves at $10.00 and $12.50; guaranteed.
$1.75
$2.75
$3.50
$4.00
$5.00
li n ij
ARE THE BEST
MONEY WILL BUY
Aermotor and Standard Windmills,
Well Casing, all sizes Pipe, Pipe
Fittings, Pipe Tools and Plumbing
Goods are always in stock ats
E. ft CALDWELL'S
CORPUS CHRIST!, TEXAS.
Spray Pumps, Onion Shears and On-
ion Harvesters are in demand now.
Gould's Pumps, Foos Gasoline En
gines. Write for delivered prices on
any goods in the Hardware Line.J;
J. F. Clarlcsii Hardware Co
Corpus Christi, Texas
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In
Shelf and Heavy Hardware and farming implements,
Studebaker Wagons, Eclipse Windmills, John Deere
Disc Plows and Harrows, Combined Riding and Walking
Cultivators, Walking and Riding Cotton and Corn
Planters, Steel-beam Walking Plows for Black, Mixed
or Sandy Land. Iron Age Seed Drills, Wheel Hoes and
Cultivators. Blacksmith and Ranch Supplies. d& !
Special and prompt attention given to Out of town
orders. Give us a trial and be convinced that our
prices are the lowest. d& d d
J
When you visit Ihe
Island City
make our store your
headquarters. W e
take good care of all
MAIL ORDERS.
Men's and Boys' Outfitters From Head to Foot.
GALVESTON, TEXAS 4-18
Own a Truck Farm
Now is the time of your
life to become--- independent.
Don't neglect it. Buy while
we are offering inducements.
The Brownsville Land & Town Co.
C. F. Elkins, U,. B
A. B. cole. IX. B.
ELKINS & COLE
ATTORNEYS-AT-LaW
"Will practice in all courts. State and Federal.
Special attention giren to land and ab
stract business. Will do collecting:
Office Over Botica del Aeuila. Combes Dms Store
J. V. HANCOCK
THE UPT0DATE
HOUSE FURNISHER
Has just added a nice line of Imported Chinaware, Hotel-ware; lie also
carries the celebrated GARLAND Stoves and .Raages, Quick Ztfeal Gaso
line Stoves, Buggies and Harness. GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES!
rCALL AT ONCE AND GET THE BENEFIT OF THE BARGAINS.
: My. B. VerheMe
Saddle and Harness Manufacturer
-And Dealer In
Fine
Saddles and Harness, Laprobes, Blankets and Buggy
I make harness from $6.00 up; Saddles from $3.5(Tiip.
Everything sold under a guarantee.
TVhips
REPAIRING- A SPECIALTY.
as it)os
The public will find an extensive
assortment of Dry Goods, Shoes,
Hats, Jewelry and Saddles at
prices without competition at
Las Dos Neciones,
M. SAHUALLA COMPANY
Front, of Market.
c c
J. A. Tillman
Dealer Ix
Staple and Fancy Groceries, Confection
eries, Fruits, Tobaccoes, Cigars, Etc.
OUR MOTTO: Fair dealing
and REASONABLE PRICES
YOUR TRADE RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED
Elizabeth St. Brownsville, Texas
E. H. GOODRICH SON
. . . .MANAGERS
Cameron County
Abstract Company
Real Estate and Mortgage Loans.
FRISCO TO CONNECT
.WITH ARANSAS PASS
Expect to Reach San Antonio in this Man
nerWill Tap "Sap" at Weaver.
Fort Worth Texas, April 17.
B. F. Yoakum, head of the Frisco
system, was in Fort Worth for a
short while today. WTien inter
viewed he stated that the reports
of the extensions to be made in
Texas were correct, but did not
state when the work would com
mence. These include the Colorado
Southern's outlet to the Gulf by j
way of Fort Worth over the Denver j
road and the Frisco & Trinity and
Brazos Valley to Houston by way j
of Cleburne andMexia. It is est!-'
mated that the work will require j
an expenditure of $50,000,000.
He also stated that the Frisco:
will be extended from Brady to
Weaver on the San Antonio &
Aransas Pass for the purpose of
getting into San Antonio. He left
here this afternoon for Brownsville
to look after matters in connection
with the road there, of which he is
president.
The Express of the 18th had the
following to say on the same sub
ject: The special car of B. F. Yoakum
will arrive in San " Antonio this
morning with Mr. Yoakum on
board. The car is expected to
come in attached to 'a regular
train over the Katy tracks. Mr.
Yoakum has been in Colorado
and will join Mrs. Yoakum in this
city. The nature of his errand
here and the probable duration of
his stay is not known in advance of
his coming, but it is rumored and
generally believed that there is
something on with reference to the
Brownsville road extension. Mr.
Yoakum, in'addition to being pres
ident of the St. Louis, Browns
ville & Mexico railway, is chair
man of the board of directors - of
the Frisco system and one of the
best known and most conspicuous
ly successful railroad men in
America.
main plaza of the city of Mata
moros are receiving a fresh coat of
green paint in honor of the distin
guished visitors soon to arrive.
Senor Roberto Gavol, chief of
engineers of Mexico, is expected
to arrive today, accompanied by
Assistant Engineer Estrada, their
visit being connected with irriga
tion matters.
Captain Carlos Arguelles, son of
his honor, Governor Arguelles,
was. suddenly summoned,, to Vic
toria yesterday, and left for that
point over the new road-.
Three American gentlemen en
joyed the hospitality of the Hotel
Matamoros yesterday. They were
Geo. W. Sanders, New York; W.
M. Warnock, Edwardsville, 111; F.
W. Anderson, Taylorsville, 111.
During part of the time they were
escorted by A. A. Browne, of
Brownsville- The gentlemen made
a critical examination of the place,
service and grounds and express
ed a frank and complimentary
opinion.
The Hessey Institute, under the
directorship of Miss Pike, has en
tered into the usual easter or spring
vacation.
FIGHT OF HIS LIFE
there Is
Gates
a Strong Combination After
and Wneat May Be His
Undoing.
MATAMOROS NEWS.
MONUMENTS
In either granite or marble; iron
fencing for private grounds
churches, school houses or otb
er public buildings or for cetn
etery enclosures. : : :
Brownsville
Pena Bmldiar, Leva Street
Undertaking;
Teleohnee 123
' The two all-absorbing events at
present in, Matamoros are the fact
that the train on the standard
gauge track has actually come in.
A large delegation of people went
out to witness with their own eyes
the first engine roll in. It was on
ly a construction train, and no at
tempt to carry" passengers has been
made, with the exception of a few
favored ones.
The other event .is the actual
completion of the arena for the bull
fights. For the celebration of the
two events lively and interesting
preparations are being made, the
people have caught the spirit, the
merchants expect better business
and the optimist foresees good
things ahead.
East night at a late hour the
committee on preparations and ar
rangements was in session in front
of the telegraph board, assisted
also by telephone, through which
means tne voice or tne governor
took part in the deliberations as
presiding officer of the meeting.
No details could possibly be ob
tained then, but they have been
promised in full today by Mr. Be
navides, the head man of the enter
prise. Speaking of the new train ser
vice, Station Superintendent Ma-
nuel Payro; jr., says that although
the train arriving j'esterday at
12:15 Matamoros time, was actual
ly a construction 'train, nevertheless
it was followed by passenger;
coaches, which will continue run
ning every other day as usual un
til the service be fully installed and
open for traffic.
Chicago, April 17. John W.
Gates is fighting the fight of his
life in the great May wheat deal
More millions and mystery hover
over the big deal than anything in
the history of grain speculation,
not even excepting the Harper
deal, when the Standard Oil mil
lions were supposed to have been
at one time involved.
The lineup on the Gates side is
composed of wealthy associates and
sympathizers in New York, St.
Eouis and Minneapolis.
Opposing Gates are wealthy men
of various sorts. Mnnv h nvf error!-
uated from the field of grain spec
ulation, others are now the great
est factor; in it the world over, and
a few unfamiliar with wheat are
against Gates in the hone of Pirpn -
ing up old scares.
Estimates dY the quantity of
Wheat that can e made available
for delivery here 'before the end of
next month differ widely. Conser
vatives on the bull side assert that
Gates' holding is overO, 003000
juoucia. xu ueu ii our. arme pres
ent jury price would mean a loss
approaching $6,000,000. . An at
tempt to liquidate it in that way
would involve a loss of probably
$10,000,000 before it was completed.
noxious weeds are olentiful. and
For this purpose if not the mower is not used- The
Inspector Mendez leaves Monterey j following spring this ground is
This is the way we
President's Engineer.
Pulling the train of President
Roosevelt out of the city this morn
ing over the Missouri, Kansas and
Texas railway, engine No. 238 is
driven by Jake Henry, an engineer
on the road for more than twenty
seven years. He came in with his
engine yesterday, and, in talking
of the precautions taken,- said:
There is not a race horse in the
whole country that is tended as
l-.-ll- ....
careimiy as mat engine wnicn is
to pull the President is cared for,
i -1 i ,
auu auoirc tne same caution is
taken with engine No. 425, driven
by J. P. Blair, the pilot engine
drawing the special train in which.
the general superintendent of the
road is preceding the President's
party. No man unknown to the
keepers can get within fifty feet
of either of these engines, and every
rivet tested oelore the- were put
into so important a commission.
lhese are the best engines on the
road, and either is able to care for
tne whole of the two trains if
an3 necessity shall arise. Our
speed over the track will be amod
erate one of about thirty-five miles
an hour. If my engine should
break down, what would I do?
Well, you can just bet this engineer
would keep on going when the
engine stopped for good. It would
be useless for me to show ud lor
work again." Texas Farmer.
Clover Bacteria On Peas.
The following is the remarkable
experience of a South Dakota man
I inoculated a small plat with
the clover germ and planted neas.
T 3 r
j. 3uuweu one quart or peas in a
solution containing the germs ten
ui mieen minutes, aim sowed as
soon as dry sprinkling the re
mainder of the solution over the
ground. They we.e planted June
17, and August 18 we began pick
ing. For six weeks we picked from
six to eight quarts per day, in all
thirty-four gallons from a piece of
ground 10x30 feet, and one gallon
from a piece of ground of the same
size lying alongside 'which had not
been sprayed with the germ solu
tion. The soil was a stiff1 yellow
clay." ' ' v
In answer to questions sent to
farmers by the Kansas F.xperiment
Station, fifteen said they did not
practice systematic crop rotation,
seven said they did. One said:
Cornstalk ground is sown to oats, !
the oat stubble is plowed in the
summer and sown to wheat in the think of
fall, the wheat stubble is mowed if time for him to go away, and stay
away.
When she forgets to -ask him to
Rotation Of Crops Pays.
That rotation of crops pays has
been demonstrated lime and again.
To illustrate, we call attention to a
few facts gathered from reports of
the Rothamstead, England, ex
periment station, where they have
been carryjng on a rotation experi
ment for the past thirty-two years.
Their result are briefly as follows:
The rotation carried on on one
field was roots one year; barley the
second year; beans the third year,
and wheat the fourth year. In
mother field continuous cropping
was practiced. Where roots follow
ed roots year after year the av
erage yield per acre was 1US7
pounds; where roots were used in
rotation the average yield was 1885
pounds per year. Barley grown
continuously averaged 2180 pounds
per year, while barley , grown in
rotation averaged 2649 pounds per
year. Beans grown continuously
produced 781 pounds per year,
while beans grown in rotation pro
duced 1618 pounds per year.
Where wheat was grown con
tinuously the average yield per year
was 1970 pounds, and where the
same crop was grown in rotation
the average was 4027 pound per
acre Thus it will be seen that
crops grown in rotation were near
ly twice as large as where the same
crops were grown year after year
on the same land. Farmers' Tribune.
Does She Care For Him?
Here are a few simple rules by
which a man may determine wheth
er or not his attentions to a girl are
in vain.
If she asks him for the fan which
he has been carrying home from
the theater, she isn't in love with
him. If she were, she .would forget
the fan and give him .a chance to
call and return it.
If she fondles the flowers he
gives her, she is interested.. If she
lets them wither in the box, his
case is hopeless.
If she often pleads a headache
and can't see him," he would
better call elsewhere.
When she yawns and says can't
anything to say:" it is
today and is expected to arrive, this
evening- He comes to see that the
road and everything connected with
it is in good shape.
The buildings; surrounding- the
listed to corn
raise our biggest corn, A field
treated in this way will make sixty
bushels per acre this, year.-Texas';
Farmer. ' '
come again, and says Jiow-do you
do when t he says good-bjv and
neglects to make up an excuse for
hint, when he jams his unbrella
through her father's hat, there is
no hope for him. Ex,
V
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