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The Brownsville daily herald. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1897-1910, July 14, 1909, Image 4

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THE AlioVNSlLLE DAHA JHIKALD
vElXttDA?, JILY 14. 1909.
5
RECEIVER ?QR THE REDS.
'
w
"Larry" McLean is the mainstay be
hind the bat for the Cincinnati Reds.
He Is considered one of the bert
catchers in the rnajor .cagues.
PLAYERS SHINE
AS THROWERS
MAJORITY OF PRESENT DAY DIA
MOND STARS SHOOT BALL
WITH UNERRING AIM.
IS PUZZLING TO FOREIGNERS.
Instances Which Show What Some of
the Big Leaguera Can Do in This
Line Remarkable Feat of Herman
Long Low Throws Faster Thar,
High "Round House" Ones.
One thing about baseball that as
tonishes foreigners more than any
thing eise is the remarkable accuracy
of the throwing. This is especially
true of those who have played cricket
The batting and the catching and
stopping of balls is not nearly so im
pressive to them as the way the play
ers shoot the ball around the diamond
with the unerring aim of a rifle shot
The reason for this is probably be
cause the foreigners can not get the
knack of throwing down as the Ameri
cans do. An incident at Philadelphia
park a few years ago will illustrate
what a baseball player can do in the
throwing line.
One afternoon the Phillies were
playing the Boston Team. "Billy"
Hamilton was in center field for Bos
ton and Herman Long was at short
stop. During the game there came a
cry from Hamilton, who was seen ex
citedly pointing to an object whicii
was dashing across the ground to
ward the flagpole jn deep center field.
The scooting object was a rat Long
was standing in his position at short
stop with the ball in his hand. Her
man heard Hamilton's cry, wheeled
around, took one glance at the rat
running across the field, gauged the
direction of its flight without the loss
of a second and let the ball go. The
ball hit the rat and there was one less
rodent in the world.
Long's throw was fully 200 feet, but
he hit the flying animal as if It was a
stationary object Xo sportsman ever
made a prettier shot at a bird on the
lng than Long did that afternoon.
Trhen it is considered that shortstops
usually throw at a man standing on
a base, Long's judgment In gauging
just how far ahead of the animal he
was to throw in order to make the
"kill" was really wonderful.
1 Throwing at an object in the air is
one of the hardest feats, for looking
up at the sky when taking aim is
much harder than when a player has
the grandstand or the bleachers for a
background. Last spring Jim Dela
hanty gave an exhibition of clever
throwing at Columbia park, in Phila
delphia. A foul ball wedged into the screen
on top of the grandstand over the
visiting players' bench. Delahanty
picked up an old ball and threw il
against the screen, missins the obiect
"GREATEST" BASEBALL CATCH
Bill Lange Made It While Playing
with Chicagos, and It Saved Him
a Heavy Fine.
The greatest individual feat ever
performed was one by which Bill
Lange, now retired, saved a game for
Chicago and ?200 for himself in Wash
ington in 1895. There is an odd story
connected with the play. Lange had
missed a train in Boston two days
lefore, failed to reach New York in
time to play there, and Anson had
fined him $100. Thereupon he missed
a train to Washington, and arrived on
thejgrounds after the teams had prac
ticed and just in time to play, and for
that Anson fined him another $100.
The game that afternoon went 11
Innings, Chicago scoring one run In
the eleventh. There were two men
out and a runner on the bases, when
"Kip" Selbach, then one of the hard
est batters, smote the ball a terrific
blow and sent it flying over Lange's
lead toward the center field fence.
The hit seemed a sure home run, but
Lange, a man weighing 225 pounds,
onna Canal Co., Hallam Colonization Co., Sales Agents $50 Per Acre
La D
nE OFFICE A
XXNA CANAL CO. LANDS,
en
turneo, anST without IqoKlng, sprint;
ed desperately straight Cut toward'
the fence, racing -with the flying ball.
At the last Instant as the ball -was go
ing over his head, Lange leaped, stuck
up both hands, turned a somersault,
and crashed against the fence. The
boards splintered, one entire panel
crashed oubvardi and out of the wreck
age crawled Lange, holding the ball
in his hand, and the crowd went mad.
Lange came limping in, with the
crowd standing on seats and shouting,
and said to Anson: "Fines go, Cap?"
"Nope," said Anson, and the catch had
saved the big fielder $200.
Pitcher Rarger of the Cincinnati
team has been turned over to SL
Paul.
George Decker, who once played
with Capt Anson's Colts, is dead on
the Pacific coasL He succeeded An
son on first base.
Ragon of the Cubs has been re
leased to Des Moines. The pitcher
was obtained from Cincinnati a short
time ago.
There are two John Everses in the
great game.- The lesser light is a
catcher and has never cut much
HANDSOME SALARIES PAID
TO STARS OF THE DIAMOND
Several Players Drawing Over $5,000
a Season While Two Receive
Twice This Sum.
The plutocrat ball team of the
t . " 1 II 1 .1 Tll.llfl 1 IT- o
.American league, it is urancu uj "
magnate, would be about as follows:
Pitcher, Donovan of Detroit, Joss of
Cleveland, and Walsh of Chicago,
each drawing around $5,000. The
catchers would be Sullivan of Chi
cago, and Criger of St Louis, each
pulling down about $4,500. Charles
Schmidt, the Detroit catcher, re
fused to sign this season at that fig
ure. Hal Chase of the Highlanders
leads the first basemen, with a" pay
envelope of $4,500. Jajoie, of course,
leads the second sackers, with his
$7,500. Bobby Wallace of the St
Louis Browns drew $6,500 for three
years during baseball wartimes, and
gets close to that figure now. Bill
Bradley, the Cleveland third sacker,
leads the players of that position
with a salary of between $4,500 and
$5,000.
Cobb, of course, tops the outfielders,
with his $5,000 salary at the age of
22. Sam Crawford, the great slugging
center fielder of the Tigers, is the
best-paid player in that position this
season, drawing close to $5,000. Matty
Mclntyre of the Tigers and George
Stone of the St Louis Browns, vie j
with each other for the honor among
the left fielders, each drawing about
$4,500.
In the National league both Man
ager Frank Chance of the Cubs and
Manager John J. McGraw of the New
York Giants are reputed to be draw
ing $10,000 salaries this year. Chance
drew $7,500 last year. Five of the
world's champion Cubs draw between
$4,500 and $5,000, as follows: Kling,
Tinker, Evers, Overall and Brown.
Christy Mathe,wson, the star pitcher
ofthe Giants, draws $C,000, and Mike
Donlin about $4,500. Leach, third
sacker of the Pittsburg club, draws
$?,6(5fr. LoCert, the star third sacker
of the Cincinnati Reds pulls down
only $4,000. , -
PreTty fair salaries, business men
will doubtless remark, that these
stars of the national game are paid.
But what of it? But for the stars
the game would be dull and the man
agers would fail Jo s;pt the money.
CANNIBALS AWAIT ROOSEVELT.
A French Hunter of Renown Warna
the President to Be Careful.
- -
New York. Henri Gauliard, an ex
official of the French government, has
written to Secretary Loeb offering his
services to President Roosevelt as
1 guide on the hunting trip the latter
has planned in Africa after his retire-
, ment from the White House. Mr.
Gauliard, during his stay in the French
' colonies, was himself something of a
Nimrod. He shot seven elephants and
many hippotami, although he modest
ly disclaims any great prowess, and
speaks gently of hungry cannibals who
prefer white men to feast on.
After leaving the French govern
ment service he traveled around the
! world In the search of health, and Is
now in the employ of the Chateau Des
Beaux Arts at Huntington, L. L
Altogether in Mr. Gauliard's experi
ence the most dangerous animal In his
part of Africa is the buffalo. But If
there is not much risk from the ani.
mals, there is some from the natives. In
his district they were all cannibals.
"They eat human flesh every day,"
he said. "They keep slaves and- eat
them when they are ready. Have I
seen them? Only once. It Is diffi
cult, very difficult to assist at their
fetes. But I know that many white
men have been eaten. They prefer a
white man when they can get elm. Jl
I ha not had many Boldlera wlm x&
they would hav eaten.
DOXXA OFEX AT ALL SMES AJfD
FOB SALE ONLY BY HALLAM CO
T3 " I
Young Herzog is one of the players
picked up from the minor leagues by
McGraw last season. His work in both
the in and outfield is of a high order,
but his weakness with the bat is all
that prevents him from occupying a
regular berth.
THE-
First National Banli
OF BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS
Capital, 100,000
Surplus
OFFICERS:
Jas. A. Browne, President S. L. Dworman, 1st Vice Pres.
E. C. Forto, 2d Vice Pres. A. Ashheim, Cashier
DIRECTORS:
M. A'onso. J. A. Browne, A. Cueto,
Jno. Closner,
F. J. Ccrobe,
S. L. Dworman,
A. Ashheim,
J. B. Wells.
PROMPTNESS
E. II.GOODRICH. President
JOHN SICAI.I.EN Vice rresiiHnt
Merchants9 National Bank
BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS
Gapital and Surplus, $150,000.00
U. S. Government Depositary
Coleman Land Improvement Co.
Will Clear, Fence, Cultivate and Develop Sugar Cane and Citrus Fruit
Lands Under Contract for a Series of Years at a Stipulated Price Per
Acre Per Year.
San Benito end Brownsville, Texas
LUMBER
I
!
g
Raymondville Lumber Co.,
Raymondville, Texas.
O. P. ARCHER,. Proprietor
Everything New.
First-Class Service.
McALLEN,
EAMS AT YOUR DISPOSAL FOR
IZATION CO.. OR OUR AUTHOR!
11! - 1 . ,
Private Lessons in
kll
By Rev.D. G. Cavasos, Graduate
Serninario Teologico Presby tei iano.
Mexico
Jefferson st., between 7 and 8
SUAMER SCHEDULE ON
RIO GRANDE RY. JUNE I.
The following is the summer sched
ule for the Rio Grande railroad to
take effect Tuesday, June 1st:
Daily, Excepting Saturday, Sunday
and Monday.
Brownsville
Leave 9:0(ra. m.
Arrive C:30 p. m
Point Isabel
Arrive 10:30 a. m.
Leave 5:00 p. m.
Saturdays.
Leave 9:00 a. m. Arrive 10:30 a. m.
Arrive 5:00 p. m. Leave 3:30 p. m.
Leave 5:30 p. ni. Arrive 7:00 p. m.
Sundays.
Arrive S:30 a. m. Leave 7:00 a. in.
Leave 9:00 a. m. Arrive 10:30 a. m.
Arrive ",.00 p. m. Leave 3:30 p. ni.
Ltave 5:30 p.'m. Arrive 0:45 p. m.
Mondays.
Arrive S: 30 a. m. Leave 7:00 a. m.
Leave 9:00 a. m. Arrive 10:30 a. m.
Arrive C:30 p. m. Leave 5:00 p. m.
BLACKSMITH SHOP
The blacksmith shop formerly
owned by N. E. Rendall, near Fron
tier Lumber Co. has been purchased
by
Manuel Flores
Expert backsmith. All kinds of re
pairing, horseshoeing, etc., done.
First class work. 5-27-lm
and Undivided Profits, $54,000
E. C. Forto,
W. F. Sprogue,
LIBERALITY
J. G. FERNANDEZ. Cashier
J. GREGG. Asst. Cashier
WARE
IMPLEMENTS
Hot and Cold Baths.
Rates' $2.00 per day
TEXAS
A AND COMPLETE INVESTIGATION OF fXHIS PROPERTY. DO
ZEB AGENTS. r
i -
Professional and Business Cards !
' !
A.W.fflLGER
PHYSICIAN AND
SURGEON
Office Over Eagle Drug Stcre
Office Hoars:
8:30 to 11:30 a. m.
2:30 to 5:30 p. m.
Office Phone 253
Residence Phone 166
Drug Store Phone 132
Geo. S. Stell, M. D.
Oilice over Jose Martinez' Drag Store
Residence, Levee and Stb Streets
Dr. G. D. Fairbanks
V. S. Pnb. r!cc!lli Mzrine Hospital Surgeon
Cfiice over Putegnat's
'Phor.w No. 254 and No. 40
E. H. Goodrich & Son
ATTO R N EYS-AT- LAW!;'
cTWORTGAGE LOANS
DEALERS IN
REAL ESTATE
City Property anr Country Prop
erty in Small Tracts
cTHANAGERS
CAMERON COUNTY ABSTRACT CO.
Frank V. KIbbe
R. B. Holland
Kibbe & Holland
AttorneysatLaw
Brownsville, Texas
Putegnat Building. Notary in Office
JAMES B. WELLS
Attorney at Law
Successor to Pqjvers & Maxan. Powers & Wells.
Wells & Rentfro. Wells. Rentfro & Hicks Wells,
Stayton & Kleberg.
I buy and sell real estate and investigate land
titles. A complete abstractof all titles of record
in Cameron County. Texas.
Practice in all state and federal courts, -when
especially employed.
Land litigation and corporation'practice.
Gregory, Batts & j
Brooks and
Sam'I Spears,
Lawyers.
We have formed a partnership un
der the foregoing name for the trans
action of our law business in the Low
er Rio Grande Valley." Offices will be j
maintained at Brownsville and San I
Benito. The business of Gregory,
Batts & Brooks at Austin, will be
maintained as heretofore.
T. W. GREGORY,
R. L. BATTS,
V. L. BROOKS.
SAM'L. SPEARS.
Office In the Browne Building
Brownsville. Texas. May 1, 1909.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Shamrock Bar
(Formerly the Rjuby Saloon
Is now installed in its new quarters in the Kirk Building.
Evervthing modern and
Upto-Date
Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars always on hand
Look for the saloon with the Green Front
C. C. CON5lDlflE, Manager
Archer Archer
Architects and General Contractors
Attention Given to Construction of Build
ings Anywhere in the Rio Grande Volley
First National Bank Building :: :: :: :: Brownsville, Texa
R. J. Swear ingen
(County Attorneys
Attorney-At-Law
CHAPIN, Hidalgo Co., TEXAS
Noah Allen
Ass't U. S. Attorney
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Will do a general prac-
hpp in all Ppr1frfi1 nnrl
'State Courts. Special
attention given to Land
Titles.
KosLoffice Building
Up SLairs
Brownsville, Texas
n B. CHAPIN
ATTQRNEY-Ai LAW
CHAPJN, TEXAS
Dr. F. C. SIZELAN
ENTIST
Somnoform for PAINLESS Extraction
PUEN7E BUILDING Phone 225
A. B. COLE
ATTORNEYATLAW
Brownsville, Texas
ANDREW GOLDAMMER
Architect
and
Builder
Phone 95
Rafael Gutierrez
Contractor and Builder
All Kinds of
REPAIRING
Corner 14th and Elizabeth Streets
Telephone No. 190
Contractor
Builder
Estimates Furnished :: Phone 28
A. W. CUNNINGHAM
Attorney at Law
Ofiice Practice Only
Brownsville Texas
If-
NOT MISTAKE THE PROIEim

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