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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, August 23, 1913, AFTERNOON Edition, Image 4

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THE SOUTH BEND NEWS-TIMES
BOUTH ISEJISTD IVEIVS-TIIVIES
THE NEWS-TIMHS PRINTING COMPANY
210 Weit Colfax Avcnne. Couth Ben Ia5Unft
Enured lecond cUra mattrr at the PcstolUce at South Bend Iadi&na
1
SEVEN MINUTE SERMON
.
v
THE MELTING POT)
DAY
ON THE GOLDEN TEXT
SATl'ItDAY, AUGUST 23, 1013
If
THE
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SOI Til IlllXn, INDIANA, AHilST 2.-5, 19115.
Till: LAW'S LIMITATIONS.
It la of course rortta 11- that tho
revolting story of t lit Diu' whiteslave-
trial and tho fearful Incidents
that caused it have to ), printed In
tho newspapers. And yet out of it,
Sood must como.
Ilecause it has horn a story of un
usual Importance the case has In come
widely known and to every irl it car
ries a word of warning and a promise
of protection from the strong arm of
tho federal government. And to
every weak and tempted man it holds
out the threat of punishment.
To those who thought this white
slavo law was simply aimed at an out
cast class with whom thvy could
have no possible, connection, the stat
ute -has assumed new importance.
Written law has become actual and
vital, it is part of the work of pub
licity that justifies that axiom of tho
law that "ignorance of the law ex
cuses no one." No c:;e can plead ig
norance after this revelation of the
sctpo and meaning of the Mann act.
And yet the law Is shown to have
some vital limitations, limitations
that only the state governments can
correct.
Had Disss and Caminetti taken
their two victims to I-os Angles in
stead of Reno, no federal statute
would have been violated, and if con
victed at all '.n the state courts, the
limit of punishment for them would
have been perhaps six months In the
county jail.
Now its far as the morality of the
care is concerned, there is not one
whit of difference between the act I
cornmltted at Reno and tho same act
committed at Los Angeles. Tho dif
ference in the punishment lies in the
fact that the United States can take
action only when more than one
ctato is involved in tho proceeding.
Inside the borders of a single state it
13 helpless.
In other words congress has seen
farther, has taken a more advanced
position that have any of the sepa
rate states. This condition only the
states themselves can correct.
One other criticism was made of
the Mann act during the Disgs trial,
that tho law was aimed at real whito
flavers. men who make a business of
capturing girls and selling them for
gain. Disss and Caminetti, of course,
were not in this sense white slavers.
They were simply vicious, nasty, im
moral youths. N3 one has charged
that they Intended to make any pecu
niary profit from their relations with
thir victims. They were simply try
ing to slough off a responsibility
that had grown irksome and danger
ous. However, it is Impossible to feel
any sympathy with the two men on
this specious argument. They richly
deserve what they got. .Most good
people will rather rejoice that the
federal statutes were so drawn that
surh men could be if not amply pun
ished, at least severely so.
Rut the law should be re-inforced
" by the states to the end that real
white slavers, who are now careful to
keep their operations within tho state
line mny he. as summarily dealt with
as those two men will doubtless be.
Till: AMERICAN SPIRIT.
The American spirit of patriotism
rose superior to the note of jingoism
sounded by en. Penrose. Republicans.
progressives and democrats met the
situation with an inspiring pledge of
faith and loyalty to the president in
his policy of veacc toward Mexico.
Counting out the jingoes of the
Penrose type American sentiment is
solidly behind Pres. Wilson's policy.
NTho American people believe pres.
Wilson is right in his position that the
Huerta government is not worthy of
recognition anil they fully approve of
his plan of peaceful intervention.
Tho United States will refuse to be
bluffed or cajoled into recognition
founded on assassination. Huerta
may as well save his strength. Nor
will the Fnited States use its strong
arm except under extreme provoca
tion. The American people want
peace on the western hemisphere and
they will exhaust every peaceful
means of securing it bt fore resorting
to force.
In this episode we are not only
thrilled by the facility with which par
tisan leaders forget their partisanship
and exalt their patriotism, but rati
fied by the patience and steadiness of
purpose exhibited by Pre.-. Wilson
under trying circumstances. Com
pelled to relieve himself of the ser
vices of a public servant who used
his opportunities to defeat tin- just
and amicable ends of the administra
tion the president lias displayed the
.strength and wisdom of convictions
which must eventually have the de
sired Influence on the distressing sit
uation in Mexico.
Whatever we may deprecate in our
political system and in politics as it
is worked Instances of the character
cited cive usura&co that the spirit of
phono irecto-y you can telephone
lilco and a bill will bo mailed iter 1U
phone 2100.
& WOODMAN
I representative.
Advertl3inir nnfMln. rri-
American patriotism remains untouch
ed, uncorrupted, and that on occasion
it may he depended upon to rescue us
from any perilous situation.
A WORD TO DEMOCRATS.
Democrats will have no occasion to
?-ro to the polls today. If there arc
any who did not vote at the demo
cratic primary An?. 6 they may safely
rest in the verdict of the majority of
the six thousand who did exercise
their privilege on that day.
The primary today is for those
members of other parties who hope to
defeat the democratic party by com
bining under the head of a so-called
citizens' movement.
No true democrat can have any
sympathy with a movement based on
false and unjust aspersions cast upon
his own party and designed to set up
a machine for the control of public
affairs by a small combination of in
terests. The democrat who has an interest in
the welfare of his party and faith in
its principles, which demand govern-
ment by the people will betray his
party and stultify himself by going'
to the polls today.
The democrat who allies himself
with this so-called citizens' movement
will be debarred from coming in later
and protesting his loyalty to the prin
ciples of true democracy as exempli
fied in the wise and beneficient admin
istration of Pres. Wilson.
He will be convicted by his own in
consistency. From the material from which the
so-called citizens ticket must be se-
lected todav it will be imnossible to
choose candidates in any way superior!
to those nominated by the democratic
party on Aug. 6.
In a number of respects the ticket
nominated today must be inferior to
that nominated by the democrats, and
in addition It will be handicapped by
the forced character of the movement
behind it and the selfish and insidious
motives which prompted it.
This is a good day for democrats to
stay away from the polls.
JFROMFS MKAL TICK FT.
It was to be expected. William
Travers Jerome is to get some more
fat fees from the state of New York
to try to keep Harry Thaw in Matter -wan.
Thaw has been a pretty faith
ful meal ticket for Jerome ever since
the former prosecutor left office.
Perhaps ono reason is in the fact
of Jerome's familiarity with the pre
vious history of the case. Perhaps
another is that Jerome will put more
vitriol and vindictiveness into the ef
fort of trying to keep Thaw locked up
that most anyone else in tho ftat
Maybe Jerome, after all the harsh
things he has said about Thaw in
different trials, would rather that the
famous prisoner should not be at i IV. Christ i the bread of life. Soto
large. If Thaw is deranged, it isn,t!spoak Ave havc no spiritual life until
, , . . - we have fed upon Jesus. He said to
unreasonable that the ex-prostecutor . hls disc!pk.Sf M noj?h ,s moat jn
should feel safer with a big stone i
wall and some iron bars between him
self and the man he has fought so
often.
It will be impossible from the ma
terial on hand for the so-called citi
zens' primary to nominate as good a
ticket as the democrats offer to the
voters of South Rend.
Col. Mulhall is working harder and
getting less pay than ever before in
his life, barring the satisfaction he
derives in soaking his former partners
in corruption.
Harry Thaw is having one of the
times of his life. He seems to have
planned his escape to feed his ap
petite for excitement.
Mr. Happ's personality rattles
noisily in his expansive public utter
ances. Like the Tribune he has not
learned the discretion of silence.
It is worth remembering that tho
progress made by South Rend in pub
lic improvements was made under
democratic administrations.
The welfare of the city should not
be trusted to those who are known to
be seeking their selfish ends.
The true citizen is governed by his!
principles, not by the policy of a self
seeking ring.
The industry of swatting tlics has
become of the most useful and
prosperous in the country.
Just now New York has all the
seeming of a hydra-headed monster.
THOUGHT HE WAS DEAD
Anderson Man Shows Up After 15
Years' Absence.
ANDERSON, Ind.. Aug. 2?,. After
an absence of 15 years, during which
time ho was adjudged dad. Chauncey
Burke. 4:', arrived hero Friday unan
nounced to visit his mother. He was
thought to have been killed in the
Boer war but served through that
campaign and amassed an independ
ent fortune in mining operations in
Africa. He had been heard from but
once since ho left home.
iiy our own ritiiACin-n
Tl
t i
JU
1
AUCJVST 21. 1913.
Jcus Kihl unto thcni, I am the
bread of life. John (5:35.
ciirist tiii: rri:ai of lih:
I. ClirM to the M)til is wliat bread
l to the boy. Bread is a staple arti
cle of food; it Is nourishing", it gives
us strength, it really stands in the
place of life, or becomes life to us as
without it we should soon cease to
live. This is precisely what Christ Is
to us, or at least it is a faint-representation
of what he is to our souls.
Without him we have no spiritual life
and. If we had, we could not sustain it
without constantly feeding upon him
who is the bread of life. Whatever
spiritual strength we may have be
comes weakness except we constantly
feed upon Christ in our hearts by
faith. Just as God has conditioned
the perpetuation of our physical life
and strength on partaking of food,
just so our perpetual life and strength
are only perpetuated by feeding con
stantly on the Son of God. We must
keep in constant fellowship with Je
sus, commune with him, love him,
realize our dependence upon him, and
thus we shall have the strength of a
giant and the wisdom of the ages. We
shall then be enabled to perform the
work of life and successfully solve its
problems.
II. Wo must cat bread In order to
be nourished with it. Bread which
is not eaten in ineffectual and of no
practical service to us. It is only
when wo partake of bread that Us
strength is imparted to us. If there
fore, we will but satisfy our natural
hunger by feeding upon bread, God,
through his wonderful processes of
nature, will do the rest. He will
transmute the bread into blood, mus
cle, nerves and flesh and all the
strength of the staff of life becomes
human energy. In a like manner we
must feed upon Christ by faith so that
he may be transmuted Into our spirit
ual natures. Only by feeding upoi
hIm can take on nis nature hi.
love, his goodness, his wisdom, and
his strength, for all these are ours
)hen constantly feed upon him.
win M.ai iis.sues pariaKe more or
less of the nature of the food which
we eat and this isprecisely the case
with our spiritual life; if we feed up
on any spiritual food other than
Christ our spiritual strength becomes
weak, even when we do not lose it al
together. Jesus is the only bread
suited to us, if we feed upon him, we
"U1 "i' y on im.rai
aueii.mii, we nave spiritual exaiiaiion
and we become unselfish. We are able
to accomplish our work and mission
in life only as we feed upon Jesus the
oread of life
III. Wo all need Rread Dally with
every meal. There is no other article
of food so useful, containing so much
nourishment, or which is more neces
sary than bread. It is about the only
thing, in the way of food, that is
found upon every table at every meal.
When we get off our appetite and can
eat nothing else, bread generally ap
peals to us; when we are hungry and
crave food, there is nothincr which wo
more enjoy, and which does us more
good than bread. There is no other
article of human diet which Jesus
could have so appropriately used to
represent himself and the" relation
which ho bears to the sustenance of
our immortal spirits. We need Christ
at every stage of life. When we are
' nppy our joy is increased by having
: i ti sbare it with us; when we are
ad v. e never fail to get out of the
experience more gladness than sad
ness, when Christ is in our hearts.
When we have plenty of friends Christ
In the company adds greatly to the
help which we receive jTrom such
companionship, but when we are
friendless and surrounded by enemies,
if we have Christ, no weapon that
may be formed against us can hurt us.
We need Christ in our homes, in our
workshops and offices, we need him
In our pleasures, we need him in all
our thinking and doing, and by con
stantly depending upon him we never
lack any good thing.
deed, and mv blood 1 d rink indord '
At this saying many were offended
and left him, but what he said Is as
literally true as any material figure of
speech can be when used to illustrate
spiritual truth. The illustration of
the flesh and blood of Jesus was used
by him to convey the thought that as
flesh and blood is essential to. physical
life, so he is essential to spiritual life.
It is by believing in him that our fouIs
are first sa)'l. Tt is stated that there
is no other name given under
heaven or among men whereby
we can be saved. Jesus is
the only meditator between God and
man; he is tho at-one-mnt between
Him and us; he connects man and
his Maker; draws them together,
causes them to clasp each other's
hand and reconciles the son to his
loving Father. It is in this sense that
Jesus is the bread of life; it is only
through him that we can receive spir
itual life, and by him our spiritual
life is continued.
FATHER PUTS END TO
LOVE'S YOUNG DREAM
Man Who Comes to Claim His Bride
Meets the Parent
Instead.
Special to The News-Timci;.
LAPOUTE, Ind., Aug. 23. His head
bandaged and one eye swelled almost
shut. A. Parks, an Englishman of
good family, left the city Thursday
afternoon, headed for New York. At
the home of W. G. Walker, head of
the Walker Starter Co., was a young
woman, broken hearted and disap
pointed. Parks was in this city a few months
ago on business with the M. Rumely
Co. While there he met Miss Walker,
who is a stenographer for the com
pany. It was a case of love at first
sight. After he Jeft here correspond
ence resulted in arrangements to be
married Friday. Parks came here
Thursday and broke the news to the
father of the girl. Walker objected
and when the persistent lover said
the marriage would take place any
how, the father of ;he girl, it is al
leged, beat up Parks and held him a
prisoner in an or. ee of the starter
company until time for a thorough
train for New York. Then he march
ed him to the train and started him
for the east, it is claimed. In the
meantime the daughter was told that
her love bubble had ourst.
ITRi: IX ROX FACTORY.
' ELWOOD, Ind., Aug. 2Z. Fire
starting shortly after midnight dam
aged the plant of the Indiana box
factory here to the extent of $100,000.
SLITJIMRFR.
Rirds that were gray in the green are
black in the yellow.
Here where the green remains, rocks
one little fellow.
Quaker in gray, do you know that
the green is going?
More than that do you know that the
yellow is showing?
Singer of songs, do you know that
, your youth is flying?
That age will soon at the lock of your
life be prying?
Lover of life, do you know that the
brown is going?
More than that do you know that the
gray is showing?
S. FRANCES HARRISON.
W'E aro edified by the Carnegie
Hero Foundation definition of a hero
which precludes a five-year-old boy
from wearing a medal for saving a
child from drowning, because he has
not reached the age of discretion.
We have it then that heroism is a
matter of discretion rather than of
impulse.
Which conforms to our idea of the
limit of money saving distinction.
And Ret ween Meals.
What a cocky fellow Mr. Huerta is
to be sure. He creates the suspicion
that he drinks arguente before break
fast. D.
WE view with nervous prostration
the movement on the woman's page
to encourage the practice of cooking
Sunday's dinner on Saturday. It can
result in nothing but treason, strata
gems and crimes.
It may be selfish or even criminal,
but a man places his Sunday dinner
above the cook's convenience, even if
the cook is his" wife, and whether it
Is selfish, criminal or merely the as
SAYS HANK, THE HOTEL CLERK
"I bet the Prince of Wales would
envy you, mlstah man," said the tele
phone operator.
"Now you are kidding." retorted
Hank the hotel clerk. "Why should
the favorite son of the British Em
pire envy a poor, overworked 'front!'
warbler like myself?"
"He'd give "most anything to have
a face like yours," Insisted the tele
phone operator. "Not for your fatal
beauty. Mistake muh not! But I
Just read that he can't grow a
mustache.
"Poor kid," sighed Hank the hotel
clerk. "My heart goes out to him.
Scion of royalty though he is, holder
of the National Sporting club belt for
choose the best possible parents yet
he is unhappy. Each morn he wakes
up by a solid gold alarm clock and
sixteen valet de chambres swarm in
with his tooth brush and slippers. He
opens his mail, which includes a pro
posal of marriage from a Russion
Crown Princess and an invitation to
visit the Sultan of Turkey in his
harem, and yet he is as unhappy
as a butcher reading a vegetarian
weekly.
"What peeves him One slant in
the mirror makes him grouchy and
gives him the willies for the whole
day. It's that stuburn upper lip.
Only the evening before he treated
it with bone fertilizer and irrigated
it with a watering can. And during
the night he hired a Hindu snake
! fc J e fi fi
STATE NEWS
5jj
T
TOO BUSY TO FIGHT.
COLUMBUS. Aaron Tooley, who
guards the prisoners on the rockpile,
said he was too busy to resent the re
marks made against him by Melvin
McKee of this city, so he locked up
his prisoners and then swore out a
warrant for McKee's arrest.
TFKTH DROVi: If 131 CRAZY.
EVANSVILLE. George Harris,
53, as a result of having all his teeth
pulled three weeks ago, has been ad
judged insanse and will be sent to an
insane hospital.
GRANT RURYING GROUND.
GARY. What is considered as the
largest cemetery in the state will be
established one mile east of this city
when a tract of 140 acres will be
turned into a burying" ground. One
hundred thousand dollars will be ex
pended on the new cemetry.
CHICKENS GO SWTMMLN'G.
SEYMOUR. Christopher Helt.
farm adjoins Sand Creek boasts of
four chickens that ake a daily swim
In the creek. Mr. Helt believes the
birds have acquired the habit because
of their proximity to the stream.
"What will you have?
"K & S"
"And yours?"
""The same"
And you?
11
Give me
Every where all the time its the
same. They call for it because it
is deliciously refreshing decidedly
appetizing and almost indispen
sable as a health drink
Get the habit of keeping K
S Beer in your house all the time.
sertion of an inalienable right, it is
his custom to demand that it be the
best of the week. And why not?
Sunday is the only day the average
man has to enjoy uninterruptedly the
societv of his family, and how much,
we ask, would he get out of that so
ciety if compelled to eat a warmed
up dinner?
It is in the consumption of a good
dinner that the best traits of .human
nature find their best development.
Man, like other animals, is most-amiable
when well fed.
WHILE at the women reformers
why not complete the job? Here are
a lot of clubs passing resolutions that
"the styles of -women's dress made by
manufacturers and sold by merchants
are such as merit criticism from the
educated and cultured wom'?n of the
country". Yet there is a conspicuous
absence of hih browed women who
do not wear these styles of dress and
look attractive in them. The princi
pal exceptions are the short haired
women who wear mannish coats, full
skirts and but never mind about that
or those.
IT took 50,000 Missourians to pull
their state out of the mud. Can't
you hear the Missouri mule's he-haw?
THE same unanimity against foes
within that we American display
against foes without would force a lot
of people to go to work either In the
penitentiary or outside.
A Little Verse.
When war prevails and impious men
bear sway,
"Tis time to get the hook for such as
Huerta.
AUGUST is gradually yielding to
the advances of September.
MORE work for the vice commis
sion. C. N. F.
charmer to squat on his chestand
try to coax out the stubborn bristles
with the music of a flute.
"And now another day has same,
and that there upper lip is still an
arid waste of British complexion.
Forgetting his dignity for the mo
ment, the young Prince fires a few
well-chosen Eton cuss wrords at his
aggravating lip. But It doesn't turn
a hair."
"You seem to know all about the
Prince's private affairs, now that I've
got you wound up," commented tho
telephone operator.
"Well, you see, I read the sporting
extras of the London Times and keep
posted on these matters," said Hank
the hotel clerk. "But what gets my
goat is the fact that all the toppy
chaps in England are sup-posed to
take their style tips from the Prince
of Wales. Just because he can't raise
a mustache with a steam hoist that
they've got to put their outey lips
tassles on the chopping block. It's a
bleedin' shime, as they say at 'ome.
"But hold, woman! Perhaps the
Prince can raise a baseball mustache
after while. Donf you know what a
baseball mustache Is? Why, if yow
count the hairs you'll find nine on
each side. Or let him try a football
mustache."
"What's a football mustache?"
asked the telephone operator.
And Hank the hotel clerk shouted:
"First down!"
COW WOULDN'T MOVE
Special to The News-Times.
LAPORTE, Ind.. Aug. 23. An ob
streperous cow met her death Thurs
day night in the barn of Ambro
O'Donnell, between Laporte and New
Carlisle, when the building burned to
the ground, being set on fire at 11
o'clock by lightning. The ground
lloor of the' barn was filled with horses I
and cows. When the fire was discov
ered O'Donnell managed to get all of ;
his horses outside and all of the cat- ,
tie, but one old cow that refused to 1
move. The loss .is estimated at ;
$3,000. The barn contained ten tons j
of hay, several hundred bushels of j
corn, oats and wheat and some farm-,)
ing implements.
BOY OF FOUR POISONED
INDIANAPOLIS, Aug. 23. Henry
Cosand, four, ate part of the contents
nf n lmttlo rnntainln f nrf;nn t r 1 1 r t ? I
and died before a physician could be
summoned. The child found the tab
lets In the yard.
VKTKRAX" KILLS SITLF.
NILES. Jesse Ayrles, a veteran of
the war in the Philippines, was found
dead in his home after he had taken
the greater part of an eight-ounce
bottle of carbolic acid.
The Misses Ruby and Pearl Cam
field leave today to spend a wek at
Winona Lake, Ind.
i
the same
si
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I
when every Home in South
Bend can enjoy Electric
Service.
Expensive Electric light is
a thing of the past. Tungsten
lamps have reduced the cost
until it is the most economical
light to be had.
Brighter and cleaner homes;
better light and less decorating
expense; perfect safety and
convenience; these are only a
few of the great advantages
electrically wired homes af
ford, We are noiv iviring already
built homes at COST of time
and material required for do
ing the work. Let us qive you
an estimate. A call on either
phone will bring our represen
tative to you.
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Ihleciilc
&G'4
PATENTS
Arc! Trade Marks Obtained Jn all
Countries. Advice Free. GEO. J. ;
OLTSCH, Registered Patent Atty., 711- 1
12 Studebaker Bid., South Bend. Il ;
AUTO AMBUX-UiCB iEBVICB.
HIRAH C. KRIEGHBAUfi
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
803 8. Main St.
Phfne? Rome 'ToT: Brtl -tjr.
THE
REAL.
Of any stove begins with its use and net with the
price you pay for it.
Let us show you the economies of our stove line.
Sibley Hardware Store
CI
Canadian Ma&lGiiai Exhibition
Toronto, August 25th to September 6th
Tlreatest Annual Exposition in the World, Attendance
last year, 962,000
ompris 2G4 acres bei uttfullv situtM en sLre .f r.i k :.t.irl.i. rlpht en
Main Lines. Over $1',.A Ovi ia buildings. GracJ Mand t I h:;1 concrete;
seats -S.Ooo.
Grand Iisp!av Agrl-ulturil Pr.lt: !, Amer
ica's H' t Ib'lves. V..rer Fh.est itt!e.
Sheep. 11; z. Mineral. Fish: Mi 11! or. f I..i:.irs in M.i r; ;:f .et a rr : I 'g and Cat
nmvs; Art (Jallery. with pihitir.vrs rr-'ai
Artists. "The .Muial MirprW :i i :
';iflets worked in. Ilnzea l'..t:id Ci.; rt .! lly. Ti e f a!i Irh (iuanU Hand.
Patriek Conway's P.ind of Sl.dts, Hydrepl.ir.e Flight. Mf..r I '."at. War Can-.
and Swimming Ka (; Auto-Pul. rh.iri.it K a . ;i. tdl.it. r FU'htn. Ilomaa
Sports. Athletic r.ntets. Ft . t'ircu ami lll;;o-.lromc ei dezet; Mjows la oLf ',
Cliaiaplon Zun ln'.U Teirri.
OranrieM P r-perta Nero ami Ilurnirj; of Itom.
Toronto itself is a bfWtiful lty .md thr dttrwav to tli I Anion ri?crnaml
of America, tlx: the .V.eoo Islands f I-rri :n !'. iy. Chirr:'::g M-iskoka Lake..
Iteautiful Lake of i:;n. Kawarthi Lak--. Alg rui-Ia Park. Mi gr.et.i w an and
French Hirers. :ind r.crWs Tini-arnt Lake. i via the St. Lawfuc To Jio'i-
treal. Quebec arid S'M r
S;.M-l:il rat Ir nii s-u:a r.-'i-i i lor-viu a::(i reium juux
Tb-Let- with day limit fll').
Kxcellent and (juick strvbe. For programs, tickets, infornjatloa
call oa
Phone Home .V3. Rdl irt C. A. M--XUTT. Pas. Ajrt.
Kvery Parmer and PusiMss Man Should Se? TLl.i Lxpv-rltion.
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HERE
wnisan
XL J. KEIDHART
114 E. Jefferson St.
Painting, Wall Papering
and Picture Framing
COST
For a Quick Job
we can put enough skilled men
to work to finish it is any given
time. The workmanship and
materials ar always the same
the bet to be had anywhere.
No
lar;
matter whether your job b3
re or .mall, or vha kind of
a plumbing job it may b, we
can handle it to your perfect .sat
isfaction. Get our estimates.
Har what your neighbors eay of
our work.
Thos. Williams
r-r:ni;iy. l.rgi.itMi :ir.i r'.t AnuerW-nn
'-d
s 1'.-.::
lio r. .v Se. ut nr.d uj
Ke-Tt.

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