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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, August 30, 1913, AFTERNOON Edition, Image 6

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THE SOUTH BEND NEWS-TIMES.
FANS LEARH THE
WHITE SOX WEAR
REAL WHITE SQX
BOOBS ABROAD.By Golberg
ACTORY LEAGUE
THE ONLY MAN YOU DON'T WANT TO MEET WHEN YOU GET BACK TO AMERICA IS THE FELLOW WHO WROTE THE TARIFF LAWS.
TAT THIS
' L v.
AROj.NJb A Mb
A LITTLE"
"TARjPF iAvuc
. .
LAv SAYS You AQe
If Ycu rt-AMF ANY tooe
DlAfCvbJ CS. ?eii S JUST
Pvjt THO-i Bottle lAsBl
AS BIG SUCCESS
rLL OvoCb TO T7KF l.fOo 'aJ
"Trie AriCLeS You
SHlTvvAiSTS OR. KiONJOS. JVST a
R5c3M SOMt CP
More Enthusiasm Aroused Than
In Any Year Yet Some
3500 Fans at Final Singer-Ball-Band
Game.
Chicago Stars Seen in Action in
Parade and on Ball Grounds.
Beat Mishawaka a Dozen to
Nothing.
- A
ZKTC" CttCCRS CamTGIL
7
X
Ihova ? Much
3
ir'i.
i
S.VTLltDAY, AUGUST 30. 191S
SEASON WOUND UP
if Ml
K
IZ, J. MUKKAY
Had
light z
Kid
Gloasor.'.s
bon as
sumo 15
ex-Not re
fftr n!nj' as thev
were
years ago
bih
Eathrop,
Dam or, vrould have d'-ne a no-hit
performance n Ph h"mK'min. Ah
It wag onti hit was made off him be
fore he retired jiftr tho eighth. The
r.nal count was 12 to nothing in favor
of tho Chicago White Sox., after thoy
and tho Mishawaka team mixed it for
nine full innings.
Tho .sai.l G baton's foot rtimo into
rromlr.tr.ro in tho fourth inning.
With two gone, hilion cracked one
down paM first anl second. It was
too far out for Chaso to grab it ami
Gleason gave chase. Tho KM got
there with every ono. but tho last
step, and while ho went down aftor it
tho ball roiled past hi extended index
linger and kept on chasing out f;
right fa Id.
.Most of Mishawaka
c t South I lend wa.s
game, part of thorn
and a
big slice
soo the
coaxed
out to
being
y the
Spnr.gbnvok-wards 1
parade
through
t u o citb
the principal streets of tho
Tho Mishawaka boys woro
in their rod cans and other
parts of
their- ball clothes while tho
Unite S'-x-. wor thoir usual blue raps,
uits and tho whito sox. A couple of
tho players hung their f ot nvcr the
tidt s of tho automobiles to show tho
public that thoy woro roally and
truly members of the Chicago" Whito
Sox and that the Kansas City Blues,
had not been shiftod horo instead.
I'arkry Was AIim-iu.
Aftor tho throng had gazed Earrv
Chappell, Hal "!;as.-. Eddie Kou:; h
i. nd a :'ov othors and admirod tho
un.lor-pinniiHT of Mr. ;ioason. tlio two
to;in.s dooided to stjj practicini; and
id-iy ball. A hunt was made fr
I'rtikoy Mcl-'arland. but as ho could
rot ho found and a Mr. Price, who
lias some voice and guesses thorn
rit;ht, about as often, as most of them,
was railed upon to do the umpire
work.
When th S"x started thoy didn't
.sprint: iinythi" that resembled in
sivlo baseball. Th- y played the old
ai-lny ame and every time they
thought thoy uisht to havi another
.-cro. some player would bo sent to
tho plate and toid to hit tho ball. Ho
ge.nt rally hit It and at least one man
would come chasing across with an
other counting.
IMdio Kousch. former Kvansvillo
sdar, was the first offered and ho flow
out. Chaso with two down tapped to
center in tho first and romped homo
:i Fournier's double. Cliappell, tho
highest of tho hU'h priced stars, was
next and bumped one to S'tlllson and
u.'i-s safe on the bo.it. Fournier was
iKiiplu off third base.
The
'ox didn't count in tho second
nor tho third. - In tbl last inning a
catch by Jones, starting a double
Tday. was the feature. In tho fourth
1'ournicr anl ('happen loth pot sin
fries and Fournier went to third on
the thrown in. Fronton fanned and
(j'.cason hit to Stll!son, Founder scor
ing on tho out. Hasterly's drive be
tween first and second scored "hap
pen, but the catcher was forced at
second on Lathrop's drive to Jones.
Iror r, t One In.
Trowbridge ami White let singles
of Herder and Fournier roll for two
bajs in the iittli and acother run
tame across. In tho sixth Fronton
was safe on .iuibhs' bad throw to
lir.-t. i!1o:imi popped to Jones and
an attempt to double Fronton at first
resulted in his poinr to second.
"White dropped l-.'asterly's drio and
Fronton scored. Lathrop forced him
second and then sto! Uoustdi's
Irit Pi.ide Junes hustle too f;;s;t and
i no in row ",.!s low. Fatlin-p tool
third on tho pla.y but
tile b:,ir.
w a:
caught
oft
FetK. r started the seventh with a
walk an J sa.r d when . nase, owinr to
jome j.oor tiebiim:, .-.rot a triple on his
drive past Second. Srhoihelhnf fo-.-ot
to irt . i.-v l-.is ell ow joints and when he.
reached, up to meet Fournier's drive,!
tho r. suit was like ;i dud thud against!
a broad plank. The ball took another!
ascent and while it was rolling to-'
wards, the fence Chase scored. Chap-I
pe'd t!cw out but Fronton hit tasM
. ! 1 .... .... I
I'Oio. tiravou was an mtieU! out
but a bub!e hv i:att rlv
nus. l.atl;rop wont out
scored two
on a driv
t.. S-uibhs.
With two down in the e
Ti'ns v re s'-ored. 'base
I'ourni r walked :nd Hal
Uhth three '
hit to left. 1
( red on i
"bappeii's
tli row to
Fournier
scored on
single to
n:
Tile
and
both
third saw Chappell
up a notch. They
Frenton's tilt to left.
or fanned.
Wrlton sue.
!i:hth. I n t n
man. but the :
fuse.', to score
re, leu i isoer m
1 1 a . i
the
one
re-
ninth lie walked
;o wore tired and
anv more runs.
Iithnp Work- Nirel.
Eathrop was working mrely
the ::rst 11 men to face him
and
w ere
rec-
it. In. ion spoil. ,i a perfect
ord when b(
Clcason. 1 fe
dumped
was safe
one out j-ast
on an attempt
dropped tlio
to steal when lbru'cr
tli row.
I n t ho vi nth a ft r
nod. Eathroj, a!ked
Trowl'ridiro. Fa.trrl's
to catch Suuibbs w ;; s
two tnen fan
Suuibbs and
J'o to soeoml
ild and tb.o
! 1 ' k
r
i
1
" A TDM OF
VfVOrG bOT IF
fo
o
two moved up a notch. Stillson end
ed it with a fly to Ilousch.
Henz went In in the ninth and
"White, the first up tapped a safe one
just back of third base. He Rot real
ambitious and stole second .and third
but two strike-outs and a fly to a
Kent Ionian, w ho the Sox said was
named (Jentleman, spoiled the last
cbaneo Mishawaka had of scoring.
Mishawaka AB. It. If. P. A. E.
White, cf 4 0 1 :i 0 2
Seheibelhunt, rf . . . 4 0 0 2 0 1
Phil ion. lb 4 0 1 'J 0 0
quibbs. :;b 3 0 0 - 4 1
Trowbridge, If 2 0 0 0 . t
Millson. 2 b 0 0 1 Z
Iandiok. c 2 0 0 5 4 0
Jones, ss " 0 0 5 4 1
Fisher, p 2 0 0 0 0 0
Wilton, p 1 0 0 0 1 0
Totals 28 0 2 27 16 7
Whito Sox AH. R. H. P. A. E.
Kousch. If 6 0 2 1 0 0
Berber, ss 5 2 1 1 2 1
Chase, lb 5 ?, : S 1 0
Fournier, rf 4 .1 ?, 1 0 0
Chappell, cf 5 2 2 0 0 0
Fronton, ?,h 3 2 2 0 2 0
Cleason. 2b 5 0 0 .. 1 0
Easterly, c 5 0 r. 10 4 1
Eathrop, p 4 0 0 0 1 0
Benz, p 0 0 0 0 0 0
Kuhn. c '..0 0 0 2 0 0
Gentleman, lb 0 0 0 1 0 0
Totals 4 4 12 18 27 11 2
m . i It . . k
Mishawaka ...00000000 0 0
'White Sox ...1 0 0 2 1 1 4 3 0 12
Stolon bases Iathrop. White, 2.
Two base hits Fournier, Easterly.
Three base hit Chase. Struck out
Hv Fisher. 2: Wilton. 2; Eathrop. 7:
Benz. 2. Bases on balls Off Fisher,
1; Wilton, 2; Eathrop. 3. Passed balls
Eandick. Double plays Jones to
Phllion. Time of pame 1:4. Um
pire Price.
FALKEM
0
G
B
Map Pitcher Holds St. Louis to
Six Hits and as He Has Per
fect Support Cleveland Wins
Three to One.
ST. EOFIS. Auff. r.O. With men
on bases Walkenburfc's speedy curves
i-hut St. Eouis out. while Cleveland
tallied throe runs. Falkenburp struck
out ten men. five of them when hits
j w ould have counted.
' Tbo visitors tallied in the second in
I nins by a bit of slow thinking: on
j Balenti's part. Johnston had singled
; and could have been thrown out at
second oaso on lurners roner. uui
Balenti elected to throw to first in
stead. (Iraney then Hied to Shotton
! and Johnston advanced after tne
j catch. Carisch followed with a single
j and the first run is scored.
In tho final inning Cleveland scored
: two runs more on three errors, a
, sinirle and a base on balls.
' .'levelmd . . ..010 000 002 3 6
St. Eouis 000 000 000 -0 t
; Falkonburp and Carisch: Baum
pirdner and McAllister. Umpires
Fineen and Sheridan.
1 Si oj.
1
CAl UJiffioOT
oj HibE IT
J3 ,
LEAGUE STANDINGS
AMERICAN L11AGU K.
W. L. Pet.
Philadelphia 81 3y .675
Cleveland 73 49 .600
Washington 67 52 .563
Chicago 65 51) .524
Boston 59 59 .500
Detroit 52 71 .423
St. Eouis 4 8 79 .37 8
New York 4 0 77 .3 41
national li:a(;ui:.
New York S2 3S .6 S3
Philadelphia 69 45 .605
Chicago 66 55 .546
Pittsburgh 63 55 .534
Brooklyn 52 64 .44S
Boston 50 66 .431
Cincinnati 49 76 .392
St. Eouis 45 77 .369
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Milwaukee 79 54 .594
Minneapolis 77 57 .575
Louisville 75 5S .56 4
Columbus 74 61 .54S
St. Paul 60 71 .459
Toledo 58 74 .439
Kansas City 58 76 .4 33
Indianapolis 50 81 .3S3
CENTRAL. LEAGUE.
Grand Rapids SS 42 .678
Fort Wayne 69 61 .530
Springfield 63 66 .490
Terre Haute 60 69 .466
Davton 5S 72 .4 4 6
Evansville 51 79 .392
RESULTS YESTERDAY.
American League.
Cleveland. 3; St. Louis, 0.
National Loague.
New York, 2; Philadelphia, 3.
Chicago, 6: Pittsburgh, 1.
St. Eouis. 3; Cincinnati, 2.r
American Association.
Columbus. 5; Louisville, 4.
Indianapolis, 8; Toledo, 2.
Minneapolis, 3: St. Paul. 2.
Milwaukee, 9; Kansas City, 3.
Central League.
Fort Wayne, 2; Terre Haute, 0.
Dayton. 4; Evansville, 1.
Grand Rapids, 7; Springfield, 5.
GAMES TODAY,
American League.
Washington at Boston.
Cleveland at St. Eouis.
Philadelphia at New York.
Detroit at Chicago.
National League.
St. Eouis at Cincinnati.
Chicago at Pittsburgh.
New York at Philadelphia.
Boston at Brooklyn.
American Association.
Toledo at Indianapolis.
Louisville at Columbus.
Milwaukee at Kansas City.
Minneapolis at St. Paul.
Central League.
Fort Wayne at Terre Haute.
Grand Rapids at Springfield.
Dayton at Evanr-ville.
Federal League.
Indianapolis, 11; Pittsburgh, 5.
Cleveland. 3; St. Eouis. 2. (11 in
nlnsE Kansas City. 6; Chicago, 1.
YOUNG TEAMS MEET.
The West End Cubs and the Hoos
ier Creams, jrs., will meet at Cassidy
hold Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
Both teams are claiming the 17 year
old championship of the city and a
good game is expected.
IPS
m I b h
f UK
y UST
on'
?ic kls. clothe-pms Goulash,
LIVJO" PILLS.1 5uR;eY(A0G JWSTRvMGMTJ
eerfsBLes in)-t
TARIFF.
'lOeiS
V
h
MAR WIII5 TROT
ft"
Frank Louis Makes Winner in
the 2:15 Pace Extend Him
self Although Only Three
Heats Are Needed.
LAPORTE, Ind., Aug. 30. Thot
ting a mile in 2:16 1-4, Omar, b. g.,
won the $600 stake in the 2:15 trot,
Friday afternoon when the fastest
race of the week took place at the
Laporte county fair.
He won the race in three straight
heats, with Frank Louis following
closely for second money. Frank
Louis, a Laporte horse, owned by
Brook Travis, gave the big bay a run
for the money, finishing every heat
nearly up to the winner's neck. It
was the big day of the races and the
stand was well filled with fans.
Summary of the races:
2:15 Trot Purse $000.
Omar 1 1
Frank Louis 2 2
John Jacob Astor 4 3
King Only One 3 4
Angie 5 5
Time 2:16 1-4; 2:16 1-4: 2:16
'2 :'M) Pace Purse $300.
i
o
5
4
1-4.
Cora Young
Little Hilly
1
4
o
1
o
. 1
. 5
.3
.4
.6
2:21
Warner Sturgeon
Bessie Gowen . . .
The Deacon
Jim Roper
Time 2:24 1-4
3
4
5
6
23
3
5
6
3-4: 2
5
6
4.
GO TO TRE CUBS
Misjudged Pop Flies and a
Couple of Timely Hits Sends
Over Five Runs on McQuillan
in the Fourth.
PITTSBURGH. Aug. 30. Misjudged
pop flies and one or two timely hits
gave Chicago five runs off McQuillan
in the fourth inning Friday afternoon
and. Pittsburgh lost the first game
cf the series 6 to 1.
Cheney pitched a grand game, hold
ing Pittsburgh to four scattered hits.
But for a wild pitch that allowed Ca
rey to go from first to third in the
first inning Cheny would have scored
w. shutout.
Carey had singled. Viox's out al
lowed "him to score. McQuillan was
relieved by Hendrix after the fifth.
j Hendrix did not allow the Cubs a hit
but he walked five men.
! In the seventh inning he walked
j two men and yet only three men
i faced him in the inning. Zimmerman
! on second and aier on first took long
I leads and when Hendrix trapped
Heine between second and third,
i Saier was caught as he over-slid sec
! ond. after Zimmerman had been re
! tired.
j Chicago OftO 510 0006 9 2
'Pittsburgh 100 000 000 4 0
1 Cheney and Archer; McQuillan,
Hendrix and Gibson, Simon. Em
pires Klem and Orth.
MILLERS WIN. OVER
SAINTS BY ONE RUN
j ST. PAUL. Aug. 29. Minneapolis
j defeated St. Paul Friday three to two
m a grime mat was a pucnin cu
test between Brandt and Mogridge.
The visiting twirler excelled in con
trol, although he allowed more hits
than the local man. Both St. Paul's
runs were scored I y Booe. who fea
tured at bat with two triples.
: Mim-ai'Uis ...00 210 CoC 3 T 0
1 St. Paul 010 000 001 2 $ 0
I Morine and 0vens; Brandt and
j Jaines. Umpires Murray and Con
1 nollv.
LAPORTE FAIR
I
EX-PIRATES HELP
Camnitz Pitches a Good Game
While Byrne, After Singling
in the Tenth, Scores the
Winning Tally.
PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 30. Phil
adelphia again lefeated Xew York
Friday in the second game of the se
ries which went into ten innings be
fore tho winning run was scored, tho
final score being 3 to 2.
Camnitz anil Tesreau engaged in an
effective pitching duel and while the
New York Giant out-pitched the for
mer Pittsburgh man in hits, seven
to four, his wildness caused his un
doing. In the tenth inning after Tesreau
had fanned Camnitz, Byrne singled
and Knabe and Paskert walked, fill
ing tho bases. Magee lifted a long
foul fly which Burns caught after a
hard run but Byrne easily scored the
winning run on the catch as Burns
throw in went high over Wilson's
head. From the first inning until the
tenth not a hit was made off Tesreau,
the Phillies bunching three of their
four in the first inning for two runs.
Camnitz would have won his game
within the regulation nine Innings by
2 to 1 had not Doolan made a two
base wild throw of Shafer's grounder
in the sixth. He eventually scored
on Fletcher's single to center. A
pass to Murray and Snodgrass dou
ble gave the Giant's their first run
of the game in the fifth.
New York ..-000 Oil 000 0 2 7 1
Philadelphia 200 000 000 1 3 4 1
Tesreau and McLean. Wilson; Cam
nitz and Killifer. Umpires Bren
nan and Eason.
CARDINALS TAKE ONE
BY BUNCHING SWATS
Roth Sallco and Packard pitch Gd
Rail Rut St. Louis Rtinches
lilts in Fourth.
CINCINNATI, Aug. 30. St. Louis
by bunching hits won the first game
of the series from Cincinnati Friday
3 to 2. Both Sallee and Packard
pitched good ball, the former not per
mitting Cincinnati to score until the
eighth inning when the locals made
three hits, which, with a base on
halls, was good for two runs, while
Packard allowed the visitors only five
hits. Suggs relieved Packard at the
beginning of the ninth, Clark having
tatted for Packard in the eighth In
ning. Magee made a remarkable
throw from deep left field In the
eighth inning, cuttirfg off Bergham
mer who was trying to score.
Ft. Louis 001 200 000 3 3 1
Cincinnati 000 000 020 2 7 1
Sallee and Wingo; Packard. Sugs
and Kling. Umpires Rlgler and
Byron.
TERRE HAUTE TEAM
TO PLAY LOCAL MEN
A baseball game between the local
IT. C. T. team and the U. C. T. of
Terre Haute will be the big feature of
the annual U. C. T. picnic to be held
at Springbrook park on Saturday.
Besides tho game. Manager Dailey
has arranged a special program of
sports which promises to furnish am
ple enjoyment for all. A special car
will leave tho station at 1:33 In the
afternoon for the park.
The line up for the game will be as
follows: Gafills c; Davies, p; Bailey,
lb; O'Dea. 2b: Nicar, 3b; Young. If;
Jackson, cf; Hart. rf With this line
up the locals are confident that t.iey
will at least make a good showing.
HARRIS GETS IN TOO
MANYH0LES TO WIN
TERRE HAUTE, Ind.. Aug. 30.
Harris pitched himself Into several
bad holes Friday and pitched himself
out of some of them, but got into too
many and Fort Wayne took the ec
ond game of the series 4 to 2.
Fort Wayne 200 000 1014 11 2
Terre Haute ...000 011 000 2 10 4
Atkins and Martin; Harris and Har
grove. Umpire. Robs.
TG 01
7 ivVlV '
mm? 7
?
Records Show That in the Last
Year 202 Men Have Been
Secured by the Sixteen Dif
ferent Clubs.
CINCINNATI, Aug. 30. Exclusive
of those players obtained by Major
league clubs from minor league teams
through optional agreements, two
hundred and two players have either
been traded or purchased by major
league teams from each other, or
from minor league teams during the
last year, according to a list handed
down by the National base ball com
mission Friday. A large majority of
these represent purchases from the
minor leagues, some of these players
net yet having reported to their
teams. All trades or sales from Aug.
20. 1912. to date are included.
The American league carried off
the honor, 102 players coming to
them during the last year while an
even 100 either entered the ranks of
the National league or will when tho
deals or trades will hae been con
summated. The Boston Nationals lead in men
obtained. Twenty-three players new
to the Boston National team have
been contracted for during tho .above
mentioned period. Cincinnati comes
next with 21., Detroit is third with
19. while the others are as follows:
Cleveland. 17; New York Ameri
cans, 15; Pittsburgh, 14; St. Louis Na
tionals, 14; Chicago Americans, 14;
St. Louis Americans. 12; Boston
Americans, 11; Washington. 11; Chi
cago Nationals, 10; Brooklyn Nation
als, 10; New York Nationals. 4: Phil
adelphia Nationals, 1; Philadelphia
Americans, 2.
REAPERS LOSE ONE TO
THE LEAGUE LEADERS
After Winning Five in a Row, Spring
field Strikes a Snag in Grand
Rapid.
SPRINGFIELD. O.. Aug. 3. Aft
er winning four straight games the
locals lost Friday's game to Grand
Rapids seven to five. Troutman of
the locals was hit hard while Bowman
fanned nine batters and kept the hits
well scattered. Withrow featured
with the stick, getting live hits out of
five times up.
Grand Rap ds .100 4 1 rw loo 7 15 2
Springfield . ..100 210 1005 12 1
Bowman and Lake; Troutman and
Withrow. Umpires Thomas and
Geisel.
EVAS FAIL TO HIT
STREMMEL'S SHOOTS
A Root by Xcc in the Seventh is Re
sponsible for Only Run Scored
by Kvansvillc.
EVANSVILLE. Ind.. Aug. 30.
Stremmel allowed Evansville five
scattered hits Friday afternoon and
Dayton won the second game of tho
series to 1. Stremmel worked
splendidly from start to finish, and
deserved a shutout. A boot by Nee in
the seventh was responsible for
Evansville's only run.
Evansville 000 000 looi r, 2
Dayton 010 010 201 :. 11 1
Hardin and Stratton; Stremmel and
Warren. Umpire, Groeschow.
ELLIOTT GIANTS TO
MAKE A SHORT TOUR
The Elliott Giants, a fast aggrega
tion of negro ballplayers, will play
the &. Gergacz tetam two games at
Springbrook park Monday afternoon
before leaving on a road trip. The first
game is to start at 3 o'clock. Both
teams are playing fast ball and a good
game Is expected.
The Giants hive gam booked
with teams at Indianapolis and Chi
cago and will play in several other
cities before returning home. They
have secured five out of town stars
for the games - Monday.. Thesr? men
will also accompany the team on the
trip.
MINT NEW FACES
II BIG LEAGUES
ups and
a basebab
financially,
a season
which created so much interest as the
one juit closed by the Factory league.
Th- old town was full of boosters
in l?o.-, when wo tirtt broke into the
Central league, and practically won
the pennant the ilr?t year. A lot ot
raving buss wt-re developed in 1910
when South Bend won the Cer.tral
league Hag under the direction of Ed
die Wheeler, but there was never
more earnest enthusiasm shown in a
baseball way than that which was dis
played during tho closing days of the
pennant race in the Factory league.
And to think that this was created
and developed of strictly South. Bend
and Mishawaka material. It wa
unnecessary to scour the country
wide for talent and every member ol
the six clubs, with the exception of
one player on .a Mishawaka club, was
of the home product variety. To think
that a little band of fellows a bit
sporty inclined can arouse the enthu
siasm of practically tho entire popu
lation over a little baseball organiza
tion tho Factory league has accom
plished much.
Success of the artistic end
league is explained In a few
namely, honesty of purpose
of the
words,
by the
players, with little or any remunera
tion except that of winning a few tro
phies at the close of the campaign.
Those are the motives which make
men light in the world of sport which
do not require people long to discov
er, who in turn will lend their moral
support and create sentiment and en
thusiasm, which always spells suc
cess. Crowd' of 3..i00 People.
However, the general public was
considerable time in discovering just
what was being brought to and from
their doors. Every factory team in
the league had its followers in bugs
and fans, but not until the last two
weeks did the bugs at large appre
ciate what a sporting event had been
developed in one schedule season of
Factory league baseball. For a local
ball game to draw about 3,000 people
and th day not being even a holiday,
for these were the attendance figures
for the final Singer-Ball Bands game,
is sufficient that the public knew that
the Factory league was in existence.
In 1910 a Fort Wayne-South Bend
Central league game drew over 7,000
people, but this was on a Sunday and
nearly 3,000 people came from Fort
Wayne to compose that crowd. It
must be taken into consideration that
two other Factory league games wero
in progress at the time of the Singer
Ball Band game, which were also well
attended, which all goes to prove that
the baseball spirit in South Bend la
far from dead.
Another reason to which can be at
tributed the league's success is tho
fact that little or nothing was heard
from the business end of the organ
ization regarding their financial af
fairs. The public at large cares little
or nothing about the financial end of
a ball club, but they are interested
in the artistic end of the game only.
Tho bugs care little if a club purchas
es players for famulous sums in stage
money or if any of the clubs have
sold or traded players to some other
league or club.
Yet it cannot bo said that some of
the club managers were not always on
the alert to spring some little coupe
on the public during some of the
meetings of the magnates. But better
counsel always prevailed and the re
sults attained speak for themselves.
Scarcely a week passed during the
season that the "directors did not meet
but what some club did not think it
had a grievance of some kind where
discussion often assumed the rem
blanoo of a Mexican war ofheo. which
sometimes drew forth bitter threats.
But in the end these men found
themselves fichting for eacli other
and for the good of the sport and es
tablished the best baseball organiza
tion that ever graced the city.
Showed Fine Spirit.
The most prominent feature of the
season was the clean manner in which
the games wero played. During iho
hottest of games the players never
forgot they were gentlemen, no mat
ter what the difference of opinion.
There were no pugilistic encounters
nor wordy wars, which always dis
gust the spectators, but instead all
protests wero carried direct to offi
cials, who had the matter in charge.
Although the players fought each oth
er to the last ditch during the games,
the best of friendly feeling prevailed
at all times among the players, w-hich
is worthy of the hiheM commenda
tion. During th
first couple
of
weeks of
tne scneaui season lew paid little or
any attention to the Factory leagu
and during tho season's infancy, by
reason of the splendid start the Sin
ger club ma'de this club was Imme
diately voted the championship. In
this there was an error as tho Stude
baker club was plugging along splen
didly. This gave an impression that
the only contenders of the Kowlntr
machine men would be the Studebak
en4. The surprise of the league was the
Ball Band.?, who proved the final con
tenders and gave the champions a
real tough fight for the honors. And
this club deserves much credit. Dur
Inf the first couple of weeks of the.
season the Ball Bands were hugging
the bottom nf the percentage column,
thev showing their heei.ss only to the
South Bond Chilled Plow
Co. team.
A little hustling and agressivenesn
with a couple of small deals, tho man
agement of this club had a t am that
compared very favorably with the
best of them in the 'eaeue. ,,nd the
grand rush thoy mad" at the v w ire
will live loner in the memory' of local
baseball bus.
Just what the future has in store
for the Factory league i3 a matter of
conjecture. There is no doubt but
what the organisation will be contin
ued, but it is quite certain that it will
bo conducted on an even Inrer scabs
in the future. Already several appli
cations are on tile with Pres. Dailey
of the league, and others of the city's
largest Institutions have declared
their Intention of a'lliatir.g with the
league next year. So it is jus: possi
ble that 1014 will s. e a wonderful lit
tle baseball league of strictly South
Bend product and the people can look
forward to a fine seanon of sport as
well as fun for the next so i son.
There have been a lot
downs in outh Bend In
way, both artiM.Valiy and
but thert- has nevt-r been

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