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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, March 24, 1914, AFTERNOON Edition, Image 1

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LARGEST SWORN CIRCULATION IN NORTHERN INDIANA
FTERNOON
ENBM
THE WEATHER.
INDIANA: Fair and
warmer tonight; W.lr.f--day
unsettled.
eowee mi;itga.v:
I "air t'nicht; . arm in
south portion; W f I r; ' !a
Increasing cloudim
probably rain or snow.
id
Edi
ition
AVERAGE DAILY NEWS-TIMES CIRCULATION FOR FEBRUARY WAS 16,152.
READ THE 'WANTS
VOL. XXXI., NO. 90.
SOUTH BEND, INDIANA, TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1914.
PRICE TWO CENTS
DESPERATE FIGHT
WOMAN SUCCEEDS
IN REGISTERING HER"
NAME AT CITY POLLS
ER
RICH MAN'S DAUGHTER
MARRIED A GARDENER
BUT DIDNT STAY LONG
ASDUITH FORGED
GREATEST LAWYER IN
FRANCE IS RETAINED
FOR CAILLOUX CASE
POSSESSION
EXCHANGES FIRE
LOSS PER CAPITA
OFSTRATEGiG KEY
( 39 CENTS
r V ..V - 7
I
IT
SOUTH BEID EIRE
TO TELL ORDERS
GIVEN SOLDIERS
' '"- ' '",7'1
f ' ' ' ' , t. .4
-y : , ., ' v. .' . , i
III TH MEXICANS
IL
Mexican Rebels Drive Federals
From Trenches at Gomez
Palacio But Reinforcements
Save Huerta's Men.
HAND TO HAND CLASH
ON STREETS OF TOWN
Gen. Villa, Leading Army in
Person, Orders New Assault
at Day Break on Torreon
Outpost.
IirLLTTTIX.
(U.S. YTLUVS 1 1 2 L I Ql KTKKS,
IWIJiACIO, Mexico, :arcli
HI. A terrific: battle has hcon rasing
at the gates of Torreon for eight
hours. The grand assault by the
constitutionalists begun shortly ho
rorr daybreak.- Tlio victory is with
i ho army or Gen. Villa thiw far and
the fall of Torreon Is Ixdieved Immi
nent. Tim federal reliiforcenieiit
cnt out from Torreon to help the
troops attempting to hold Gomez
ptiJlacio ha heen driven hack in
utter route.
nEUMKJIEEO. ;State of Sonora.
?.Iexico, March 24. (Constitutionalist
IEosm) desperate battle is being
1'ought Tuesday between tho Constitu
tionalists and "federals for possession
of the strategic key of Gomez palacio,
;i few miles northwest of Torreon.
Throughout tho greater part of the
night, the conflict raged with the con
stitutionalists victorious in the first
rpart of the light. Tho federals were
driven from their trenches, but upon
receiving' fresh reinforcements from
Torreon. they nmod si lierco assault
upon Villa's army.
According to dispatches from tho
front. brought here nt 2 o'clock by
.uttomobilo from tho battle line, tho
onstitutionalists occupied tho suburbs
.f Gomer palacio at D o'clock last
night after CO hours of long range
righting with artillery. Tho artillery
under General Felipo Angeles, chief
nrtillorj'man of tho rebel army, sue
i ceded in silencing tho heavy puns of
iho o.tter works of the federals and
the "ilcr was Riven to advance. With
hclh ficreanvnir over their heads tho
constitutionalists started forward in
tho darkness. Behind and before
them tho blackness of night was
rrierced 'by the continuously lightning
to tho artillery.
J'iglit at 7Iose Kange.
AmM tho rebel yell, tho constitu
tionalists poured over the fresh oarth
worka on tho outskirts of Gomez pa-'
lacio. Once in the. town proper, how
ever, the engagement pained in vio
"enco with hand to hand righting in
Kill th Ftreet-H. From the nearby hills
troops poured a hot lire into tho town,
rpparently careless whether they killed
tfriend or foe. Th.r superior forces of
ihe constitutionalisms finally pained
;1hem a victory anI the federals pave
Svav In the direction of Torreon.
l'ofofe tho federal1 had retreated
fnr iucy marchfd into the ranks of
reinforcements which had been sent
from Torreon. Lines w?ro reformed
rind the government forces returned to
1he attack, the battle rapinp more
fiercely than ever.
Tho "battle died down finally, both
s'des restlnp on their arms for a re
newal of the ( ontlict at dawn. General
'Villa ordered a peneral advance at
-daybreak, confident that tho federals
could not stand before his greater
numbers and superior ordnance. The
rebels nlso had the advantape in posi
tion, having stormed the federal works
upon tho h ills wet. south and north
f onu'Z palacio.
"Determined to 'Hike T'alacio.
General Villa was determined that
rjomes palacio should be taken nt any
cost. His vigorous ami aggressive
spirit communicated itself to his men
and then- foupht with extraordinary
fierceness.
General Erfugio Yelaeo. tho fed
eral corr;.4iuler. haI stalled much on
the ability of his men to hold Gomez
palacio brau of its strategic import
ance. The first details of the lonp
rnd bloody battle which rape around
C.omez ialacle all day Monday were
'received by courier durinp the morn
inp. Here Is the story of tho tipht.
.one of thepreatest of the constitution
alist campaign :
The rebel attack upon the "!ey town
t ns bepen by the force.- under Gen
rtepa. General Garcia and General
Pereyra. The men were ma?(i be
hind the batteries for a charpeas soon
ns tho federal putuiers bepan to rive
way. After the 4'onstitutionaU?ts nn-iiei-
Generals 7 fernnndex and Iiodri
'rMe had c:pt::red I.erdo. their forces
-plit. part of th'nu poimr to reinforce
tlio rebels south of Torreon and th
balance Joininp t!ie troojs attackinp
'i-'r,i'Z palacio.
TM; pae the re! el in the army in
-nrt of Gomez palacio about 7. COO
tu is. It vas not until after darkness
fell, after the artillery duel had raped
;ill day joiar. that the f tieral artillery
rv eake:u(' and te order for an ad-
ann- , ei Id be p-iveu.
Ufa n Iir;ti Line.
Get er;d 'ila was on the Jlr'nsr lino
fn t''ou r.H iu"inp the batt!e. T.av
fpp a bor' sb.(, under him. Several
"bullets pierced bis coat.
WhT. tli- federals bpan to plve -way
" 'ilia sent word to all his irer.erals
that, a, general assault would be made
n Torreon frm all s'.des late Ttesday.
3Ie sahl he expected, to bo i:i Torrion
before "Wednesday.
nar!y Tuesday Villa r.iv" hero by
aatomoblle and talked ov. r the tele
:raph wire with "hihuahua Cit and
.Tuartrt:. later r tu'T.inp to the frlnU
tTd:Vi:i.NI, O. The poliN have
enliste,! in the "dun't s'.vear" move
ment, and have b -n ir.str'.a-ted t de
t tin tttfr-nders .lt d .:ie tijetn a j-ecld-
Hardenbi'ools,
Special Correspondence.
ST. PAUL. Minn. Mrs. Clara Har
denbrook is the only woman in St.
Paul who suceeeded in registeringr on
icpistration day in St. l'aul. She
mado the successful attempt becauso
sho is interested in tho fipht St. Paul
women are makinp to vote for com
missioners under the new city charter.
WABASH GIRL TAKES
BICHLORIDE TABLETS
Physician Say She Will Live I-cw
Days lint Eventually
Siicciinib.
"WAB.VSI F, Ind., March 2 4. Two bi
chloride of mercury tablets taken by
Miss Golda Howell, IS, are responsible
for "her critical condition at a local
hospital. Physicians say she may live
several days hut will eventually suc
cumb to the poison. They wero un
able to diagnose her illness for some
time until the pirl finally told them
what she had taken but refused to as
sign any reiison for wanting to die.
TERRE HAUTE BOY AT
BAY IN A GUNSHOP
FIRES AT 15 POLICE
TKIUti: HACTi:. Ind., March 1!4.
Ernest McWilliams, aged 15, held 13
policemen at bay early this morning
and tired nearly 10e- shots at them
from his position in Tetzefs pun store,
which he was robbing.
No policeman was struck. The po
lico fired many shots and hit the boy
six times but he was not faially in
jured. He used. three automatics and
a ride and had stacked near him many
boxes of cartridpes. lie says no one
was with him, but the polico believe
an accomplice- escaped.
McWilliams was arrested a week
ago for stealing corn, but made such
a good impression on the probation
olficer that the charge was dropped.
PLESE TRIAL IS OPENED
HO CGI I TON, Mich.. March 2 4. The
trial of Luka Plese. a striking miner,
charged with tho murder of Dcputv
Sheriff James M. Pollack near hero
on Oct. 2S, 1S1,'. began this afternoon
at JAnse. George Briskie, who is
accused with Plse, will be tried later.
Th? two strikers confessed tho mur
der when they were arrested, but af
terwards refuted their confessions and
demanded separate trials.
EMERY ASKS FOR
Declares Congress Has no Right
to Take This Course With
Private Citizen MacDonald
Wants House to Try Case.
WASHINGTON'. March 2 1. De
nial of tho right of comrress to cen
s no a private citizen, was made to
the house judiciary committee Tues
day by J am cm A. Emery, attorney lor
tho N'ational Association of Manu
facturers! on behalf of himself and
tho other officers and emplcoes of
the National Association of Manufac
turers in the Mulhall lobby scandal.
Itep. McDonald of Michigan had
urged that the case be decided by the
house itself acting as a court and
that the committee recommend full
debate and proper action bv the
house,
mitt eo
rights
The
Kmery pleuded with the coin
to go slowly lest it invade the
of individual citizens,
language of this rcuort as to
myself and my associate." hei said,
"meant that you recommend that tho
house shall inflict punishment on pri
vate citizens. Censure is punish
ment. 1-or a reason of censure there
Ls no remedy. Never in tho history
of congress has a resolution of cen
sure been adopted until the party
who were to be censured have been
notified and given an opportunity to
defend themselves. You propose
here conictlon without trial and
judgment without a hearing."
Coui.scl Emery denied the right of
the 0;'rd congress to take notice of
alleged offenses committed during
the tJind congress.
Hep. Floyd indicated that the
house would be wiii.nu to hear Em
ery and his associates beforo passing
Judgment.
HEARING BEFORE
BEING CENSURED
Captain Winterburn Reports
Federals Directed Guns
Across Border and U. S.
Troops Returned Volley.
WASHINGTON'. Mar. l 21. Con
firmation of the rcporte.: exchange of
shots between the American border
patrol and Mexican fb 3ral soldiers
on the other side of t Rio Grande
reached the war department Tuesday
in a report from Capt. Winterburn of
the Fourteenth cavalry.
The official report of the skirmish,
the first actual conflict between Amer
ican and Mexican troops since the war
of 1S4S. did not include the account
of any casualties on either side.
Capt. Winterburn's report, trans
mitted through Brigadier General
Bliss, read:
"At 3 o'clock yesterday SO federals
caught 45 constitutionalists opposite
Cienegas, five miles west of Del Bio.
Constitutionalists surprised and the
detachment jumped into the Bio
Grande, 15 of them being killed in
crossing. Twenty-nine were captured
by my patrol on this side. Men under
guard here. Federals' fired over 500
shots at my patrol on this side of the
river. Fire returned by my patrol.
Constitutionalists moving on Las Va
cas fr'im Langtry. Las Vacas now oc
cupied bv federals. Complete- report
by mail."
IF YOU CAN REMOVE
YOUR TEETH YOU ARE
DENTALLY UP TO DATE
CHICAGO, Jlarch 24. If you wear
dental bridge work that you do not
removo at night before retiring, youj
must submit to another dental oper
ation and have one of the new land
substituted for the old, if you want
your teeth to bo strictly prophylactic.
Thiy was the important fact empha
sized Tuesday at the clinic of 4,500
dentists of the United States and Can
ada, who are hero to honorthe Illi
nois State. Dental society in the gol
den jubilee. Dr. Donald M. Gallic of
Chicago outlined the most progressive
step in dental surgery in the last year
in explaining the construction of the
removable bridge, as a sub for the
fixed bridge work.
"The wearer of a movable bridge,
will be in no way inconvenienced,"
he said. "By the new system in inter
locking now used, falso teeth remain
immovable except when it is desired
to remove them for cleansing."
"SHOVE AND ROB" CAR
THIEVES GET $3,000
FROM HAMMOND MAN
HAMMOND, Ind., Mai'.h What
are known as "shove an 1 rob" street
car thieves robbed John Minas, a mer
chant, of $3,000 in cash and cheeks
on a. 63d st. and Hammond car. Threo
other victims report losses of w;i!lets.
In the pitst three years S4 people have
been robbed n Chicago and Ham
mond street cars and not a single ar
rest lias been made.
"GUN TOTER" IS FINED
Tollce Conllcate Wcaiwui Carried By
I'orct Matthews.
Forest Matthews, who lives with his
mother at 1101 Oakland St.. Biver
I'ark, was fined SI and costs in police
court Tuesday morning, for carrying
a concealed weapon. He admitted
that he has been carrying a revolver
in his pocket for some time. Tolice
confiscated tho weapon.
JAPANESE CABINET QUITS
Nation Without Parliament or
Ministry.
TOKIO. March L'4. The gravity of
the Japanese political situation was
intensified Tuesday by the resignation
of the cabinet headed by Premier
Count Ynmamoto. The country is
without parliament or ministry, the
emperor having prorogued the diet
Monday. The budget has not been
passed and a financial crisis is threat
ened. BEAT UP FACTORY OWNER
Strikers Capture Proprietor and Ham
mer Him Cp Badly.
Xi:V YOBIC. March IVur
leaders in the garment makers' strike,
three of them women, were arrested
during a riot in front of the factory of
Henry and Louis Kumbold. Brooklyn,
Tuesday . .
A mob made up chiefiy of women
attacked the owners of the factory
Tuesday ami the latter were badly
beaten before being rescued by the
police. . A riot then started in which
many were hurt.
FANNIE CROSBY, BLIND
HYMN WRITER, !S 94
imiDC.nrOnT. Conn.. March 2 4.
Fanny Crosby, the blind hymn writer,
celebrated her 9 4th birthday anivc-r-sarv
Tuesdav .
"I am in excellent health
as young as I did when I
"4,; Fhf told visitors who
h.r.
.nd I feel
was only
culled on
!
v- ?
A'' -
j - i l r l
- -i -jt . . . .
NTEW YORK After repeated and
vehement denials the statement was
at Inst issued by the millionaire fath
er of Julia Breitung that his belived
daughter had "gone through a mar
riage ceremony with Max Kleist." Ho
was careful to add, however, that sho
had immediately returned to live with
her parents where "sho prefers to re
main." Kleist ls a garden laborer
whom Miss Julia is said to have met
at tho Ilreitung summer home, Mar
quette, Mich.
TERRE HAUTE MAYOR
NOW BEFORE JURORS
Donn M. Uobcrts Case Heady for
Trial Haul for Kvidenco to
C'onio Before Court,
TKItUE HAUTE, Ind.. March 2 4.
Twelve jurors have been accepted ten
tatively Tuesday by the defense in the
trial of Mayor Donn M. Roberts, in
dicted lor election frauds.
Judge Fortune will hear Chief of
I ohce Holler, Henry Jiaeber, plumb
ing inspector, Mayor Roberts and oth
ers who caused a raid with a search
warrant on tho office of .Special Pros
ecutor Hamiil, where some of the
election documents were being exam
ined by Miller Davis, who is not a rep
resentative of the court.
Roberts' people hold that this was
in violation of the law and will inval
idate a verdict returned against Rob
erts. Tho prosecution holds that the
raid was in violation of the court's
order giving the documents into tho
custody of llamili.
CHURCH BELLS TOLL
SIN RICHMOND FIGHT
TO OUST SALOONS
RICHMOND. Ind., March 24.
While the belfry chimes of Reld
Memorial church incessantly tolled
"Onward Christian .Soldiers' the
voters of Richmond besieged the polls
with unprecendented zeal to cast their
votes to either drive out or retain the
5G licensed saloons existing in this
city.
Every indication pointed to a rec
ord vote being cast not excepting the
tremendous presidential poll at the
last national election. Both the wets
and drys conceded that fully 80 per
cent of the total vote would be reg
istered by noon. At many of the pre
cincts a vote a minute was the rule
and at one place 100 ballots had been
cast by 7 o'clock. The "drys" wero
making many challenges, but very few
were sustained and but one arrest for
illegal voting that of a foreigner
was made this forenoon.
No Children at Polls.
By special edict of the school board
all children were kept away from tho
polls, and this was significant in view
of the "save your boys and' girls"
slogan which cut a big figure in the
campaign.
Another significant feature of the
election was the absence of women
at the polling places, it having been
decided by the "drys" that they
should remain away.
Tho women workers, however, as
sembled at the various churches' and
there served toffee and lunch to
voters.
The weather was magnificent and
while interest was at a high pitch
there was no sign of disorder.
The drys were still maintaining un
abated confidence, while the wets de
clared they could se. p( reason for
reducing the prediction of victory by
at bast 1.1' 00 majority.
From an unbiased view point the
concensus of opinion on the streets
Tuesday seemed to indicate that the
wets would win by at least a small
margin.
NEW YORK Andrew Carnegie
dropped a dime while attending a na
tional civic federation luncheon at the
Hotel Astor. Mr. Carnegie s. -arched
for the coin and found it together with
another nickel.
-; v'-" - .
-C' ...
Mf, fit
Premier Will Produce Papers in
Gen. Gough Resignation
Case Before Commons at
Wednesday Session.
BY HERBERT TEMPLE.
EON DON, March 1M. Unionists re
opened their attack upon the govern
ment in the house of commons this
afternoon, forcing Colonel J. E. P..
Seely. the secretary of war, to promise
to lay before the house Wednesday
all the documents in connection with
the resignation tendered by den. Hu
bert Gough, commander of the Third
cavalry brigate in Ireland on Saturday,
when " hostilities in Ulster province
seemed inevitable.
Premier Asquith announced that the
documents would include the written
instructions to General Sir Arthur
Paget, commander-in-chief of the
royal forces in Ireland.
This action, said Premier Asquith.
would give the member;? of commons
an opportunity to discuss the army sit
uation from all anerles.
Kind's lTograni.
From reliable sources it was re
ported that the king his placed the
following program before the cabinet
for the conciliation of all factions in
Ireland:
1 That Ulster counties be given an
additional six years, making 12 in all
luring which they might be excluded
from the operations of the home rule
till.
L That all army officers who re
signed when civil war in Ulster .seem
ed inevitable, bo taken back without
loss of merit.
Unionist newspapers boasted Tues
day that the present outcome of the
clash over home rule has resulted In
a victory for the British army.
"If tho Orangemen continue their
protests with their threats of war
home rule is dead." declared some of
tho radical newspapers.
On the other hand liberal organs
claim that the Irish policy of the lib
eral government has been vindicated.
They promise that Premier Asquith
will soon have another statement to
make in the house of commons which
will go far toward wiping out the ex
isting hostility.
Conference of Cahinet.
There was a conference of cabinet
ministers in Downing st. at noon when
the situation was canvassed at length.
It was subsequently reported that the
troops which were rushed to the bor
ders of Ulster will soon be ordered
back to their original stations.
Alarm has. begun to show itself in
the camp of the Irish nationalists.
The future of the home rule bill is un
certain. Although the? government
has pledged itself to pass tho bill,
amendments may yet be added which
will make the measure unsatisfactory
to tho party which has been lighting
for its passage.
John Redmond and jither leaders of
the nationalists have been asked to
secure further pledges from Premier
Asquith and the cabinet that the bill
will not be further impaired than to
srive Ulster province a temporary
term of exclusion from the authority
of the Dublin parliament.
Predict Dissolution
Many persons in political circles did
not hesitate to predict Tuesday that
parliament will be dissolved beforo
tho home rule bill becomes a law and
general elections ordered.
This and other political reports
made their influence felt in the stock
market during the day's trading and
tho same shares were consequently
depressed.
The Irish nationalists will fight bit
terly against such a culmination of
events. Thev ridicule the claim of the
unionists that 70 per cent of the army
officers would desert their posts in the
event of civil war in Ireland.
Through the chaos which has so
quickly followed the events in parlia
ment last Friday when the unionists
launched a vote of censure against the
government, the fact is making itself
more apparent daily th.U the liberal
ministry is losing instead of gaining
strength. Even members of the lib
eral party are sharply criticising
Premier Asquith for his home rule
"blunders". Chancellor Lloyd-George.
Colonel Seeley, the minister of war,
and First Lord of the Admiraltv Win
( CONTINUED ON PAGE 12)
TWO MEN ARRESTED AS
M'GARRICK KIDNAPERS
RELEASED BY OFFICERS
PHILADELPHIA. March 24. Two
men who were arrested hist night in
Garden Lake. N. J., on suspicion of
being' the abductors of little Warren
McCarrick, were taken to Camden
Tuesday, where they were held to
prove to the satisfaction of detectives
that they had no hand in the kid
naping. At the same time detectives
were sent to Egg Harbor, N. J., to ex
amine two ssupects who were said to
answer the description of the men
seen near the McCarrick home when
Warren disappeared.
The authorities are having more
than 150,000 posters containing a pic
ture and description of Warren print
ed, and the cotintry will be flooded
with them, making the search nation
al. FLEE IN WARDEN'S CAR;
GAY TIME IN CHICAGO
THEN BACK TO PRISON
JOLIET, III., March 2 4. "Silent
Ed" Smith and McGee, trusties at the
state prison, who escaped last night,
returned Tuesday. .mith and Mc
Oc'i explained that they had simply
gone out for a spin in th warden's
automobile and kept on
they reached Chicaco.
mot several old friends
driving until
There they
who encour-
ag-d them to "forget" they
were con
time was
vict. When their good
over they started back to the prison.
When they met Deputy Warden Walsh
who was hunting for them, they took
him in the car with thon and drove
to tho prison yard .
J
T
Special Correspondence.
PARIS. The greatest lawyer in
France, Maitre Labor!, has been re
tained to defend Mme. Henriette Cail
loux, wife of the French finance min
ister, who killed Editor Calmotti of
the Figaro March lk Tho famous
counsellor says his client deeply re
grets that the editor died, as she mere
ly intended to wound him.
TANNENBAUM'S CASE IS
TAKEN UP BY COURT
Youthful Leader or I. W. V. Placed
on Trial for Demonstration of
March II.
NEW YORK, March 24. While ex
tra policemen forced back a mob of
200 shabbily dressed men clamoring
for admittance to the court room,
Frank Tannenbaum, the youthful I.
W. W. leader, was placed on trial
Tuesday before Judge Wad hams in
general sessions court on an indict
ment charging him with misdemeanor
in connection with the raid of the
army of unemployed on St. Alphonsus
Roman Catholic church on March 14.
If found guilty Tannenbaum faces a
$500 line and a year's imprisonment.
Only those who had business in the
court room or who had passes issued
by the judge or clerk of the court were
admitted. These precautions were
taken to prevent any outbreak. Bulle
tins regarding the progress of the trial
were . Hashed to the I. W. W. head
quarters in West st. A special panel
of 50 talesmen was called. The
veniremen were questioned 12 at a
time by Assistant District Attorneys
Press and McCormiek and Justice
STiellield, representing Tannenbaum.
DOUBLE LIFE SECRET
OF RICH IRONMASTER
TO BE BARED IN TRIAL
LOF1SVILLE, Ky., March LM. The
secrets of the double life that the late
Louis I. Ewald, the millionaire iron
master, lived in different parts of
Eouisville. will be bared in the next
few days at the trial of the sruit which
Ellen tloluen brought for $1,750,000
of his estate, which got under way
Tuesday. Attorney Crawford, who
lepresents the three children to whom
Ewald left his millions, will contend
that Ellen Oolden could not have been
Ewald's common law wife, because
Fhe had entered into a common law
marriage previously in St. Louis, be
fore she met Ewald.
Attorneys representing Mrs. Golden
Tuesday declared that they would
show that on Preston st., where Ewald
maintained a home for the Golden
woman, he was known as John I.
Golden, a traveling salesman.
iO ACQUITS SIX
Special Judge Albert Slick in
City Court Renders Decision
in St. Casimir's Cases Con
victed Men to Appeal.
Five defendants were found guilty
and six were acquitted of the riot
charges growing out ot the trouble at
Casimir's Polish Catholic church
on Feb. lo, by Special Judge Albert
Slick in city court Tuesday morning
who gave his decision.
Fines of $25 and costs were im
posed and appeal bonds were tixed at
$200 in each case. A motion in ar
rest of judgment was made by attor
neys but overruled by the court. Ap
peal bonds were later tiled.
Those found guilty were Igiiatz
Khnnie, Leo Michor. Steve Ranaszak,
Casimir Gracz and George Ranaszak.
Those acquitted were- Walter J.
Kucharski, Harry Paeire, Joseph
Gajewski, Alexander Hajducki, Peter
Krych. and Michael Przybylski.
John Hes and Charles Niedbalski
will appear with the defendants who
will be tried, next week. It is re
ported that both Hes and Niedbalski
are ill. Hes received injuries in
flicted by policemen on the day of
the riot at the church.
The court room was again packed
to capacity when the li defendants
appeared to hear the results of the
trial and a large crowd of spectators
lined the corridors. In acquitting six
of th- men the court asserted that
thero had not been sutticient evidence
entered to find them guilty.
Attorneys for the convicted men as
serted they will appeal the ras to
the superior court. Trial of 10 more
of the cases as a result of the trouble
at the church on tb same day will
v held on April 1.
V. i
y ... . . . . .
m
FINDS FIVE-GUILTY
01 RIOT CHARGES
First Annual Report of Marshal
Longley Shows Total Dam
age By Flames in This City
Was $21. 21 9.
OVERINSURANCE RULE
THROUGHOUT INDIANA
View of Whole Situation Re
veals Great Temptation to
Incendiarism to the Small
Property Owner.
The List annual rrp.ri from !h- :
lice of W. K. L"iiglc, state lire mar
shal, whiv'h has just be-n Kiveii t tu..
public, deals comprehend ely with th
question of the preab nce of (he nie-bu-
in Indiana.
From the time th.it the i re mar
shal's oMice in gap work early l .-r
spring to Dec. :1, Ui;'. too stale
ciai succeeded in obtaining ten con
victions for arson in Indiana. Artt
numbering tbirty-thi e.. u r- mad .
Pleas of guilty were entered .u ei-ii:
additional cases: acquittals were forth
coming in si instances; th re v. i -sixteen
cast s pending; there w v
three suspended sentences and oi
jury dlsagn ed.
Evansville' p r capita tire b-.- w.t
S1.2B, with a total dama.ue to pro" -rt
$b7. ;."(). l'ort Wayne had a p-r
capita loss of ?1. '", and a total dan: -ago
of $G7,..4it.
Northern Indiana cities a-- a rub
did not suffer as did centtal aie.
southern Indiana cities, with ibe pos
sible exception of Michigan ' 'ity ami
one or two others.
South P.end was a notable example
of this fact, the per. capita tire he--there
being but cents and the total
lire damage being J21.2U Terre Haute
had a per capita lovs rf ?1.2i and
a total damage of ST:'., 2 47.
Whiting Lo- Small.
Whiting had but three hr.-s .lurin r
the period, with a per capita bss S
IM cents and a total damag" 'f
J2.2.;:..
Winchester was high in ot-r eap.i.t
cost with $10.20, and a total damage
of $71,155.
Statements, made )y the legal de
partment of the tire marshal's' otlic. .
point to the enormous ovtr-insurar.ee
of properties of all soils in Indian.!.
A table in the report shows tlo total
number of lin-s in each county, with
tho total loss. Another show th"
total loss in each city of four thous
and population or over, with the total
loss. Indianapolis, of course, bad
the largest total number of tire: 0"1.
with a total damage to the property
of $1.04S.S92. The total value of the
porpertv here in which tires occurred,
was $0,4S2.:'.Go. and the total insur
ance carried on the prop.rty va
$ 4,8 5 4.0 5 C. The loss, divided among
tho inhabitants of the city was .4.4".
for each resident during the part of
the year in which statistics were kept,
bmcr in T!al I's
Other cities of the state were lower
in total losses, although in many in
stances the per capita bs v.as mU' h
higher. n Fast 'hi ago the p.-r cap
ita loss was $y. 2:. while in Eikhait
the per capita loss was but cent-.
Gary's lo.-s was low as a total, being
$2G.5t. and the per capita b.ss there
wa-s ?l.d. The total damage tr.-m
lire in Goshen was f-mall. ing
.5f while the per capita l"-s th.-r--rivalled
Elkhart, with ,: c nt. M
Hammond the per capita b -a as
$2.27 and the total damage w.i- 4..
C04. ILichmond had the lowest p r
capita loss. 12 c ents. liu.-hvilb .
meanwhile, had the hiirhe-t per capita
loss in the state. 27."7. :md Michigan
City was a close second with a ir
capita loss of $2::. 7::. The total dam
age to propertv in Kuh iiV v, a - $1 '
33." and in Michigan bu- it was
SL-1.43. Laport" va-- lc m to"
total per capita " 't" hr .-. v.! 1
31 cents anl her total d.nnai;- :io:i
fires was only $.25:'.
liegardinc the o-.er-:-.uranee
throighout Indiana, tic- report ael.
Mtu h ()vcr-In-urau c.
"It is impossible to d-a! with In
diana lires in tin- aggregate withe.:
being imvress-ed with the fact, tha'
there is an enormous r-in-arar.e
r.f properties of all s..rt-. ranging
from live stock throP.trh the categ..re--of
risks to the dilapid it dwelliiur
house reli of the halcyon d.iys ot t.:-pas-t
I'very where temptation lies ::
th- pnth of the small .rop'-rty owner
temporarily down on his l ik. Rant
ing a purehas-r for deteriorated hom
ings, he sells out to the only ot:,.
availabU th- insurance cmpir.y. H
trade medium is a match. Tins . li-s
of criminal w do not reo-irr.:- :i-
the professional r.rebuir. Hi-, ho- -ever,
is a tvp- far more num.. ro;: than
the other: hi.-! actr.tty s.o-'.b t.;e .r -nual
fre b-s and from hi- r.ir.K, in
professional i r- rr. it.-d. . .
There can be ?.o d-ubi a
xvholesom- local eff. ct foHowi pr----
for -,ron. The c.n v i. t ;-n
TV.L.'. ' -
. r . t i- r i v v : 1 v : i e . v
,1 . ...... .... 1.1
1., U j
i .
neijrh1rs of having p.rot.ted b
a :.r- .
. , .. i-inri' to tne H'.S II .11.
1 v.
pany. and ultimat'-ly to th- p-ddic. .
an amount that an only e-nn.a!-ed
One record shows tb.f tor .'.
;nonths of the history of or Ind:ir.a
count,v. there has ra-r 1 . .-ri a :.r- .
unknown origin. This happv c :. :
tion prevailed fd'owing tb.e arr-
two well-kr.own men of tb.e ci,,rv
seat on charges of arson. Irwiran
men trenerallv declared that this o-ur-tv
had had the highest moral ho.r.I
in the state
Old Vacant Pudding Menace.
In relatlr n to th in pe-t i..:i pi:---
rf h'c work, the tire i.irsh.al's r t- 'f '
4- -- - ...
said
"Vac ant dd ipi.l.ite.l bui
.1
are an open invit il'.en to tramp
loiterers and ini'hi- on s p-ro!.-through
wh..-e r ,r--b .-r.- r. .lt.
oftet started. I ' ; ' ".'. beii.i-.jv.:-.
5 1 .. o i ' : 1 1 o : .1 ! ?' ; '.' i
to life and lite.!'. 1 1 h ,s ! n :mT'..
s:b!e in the nine months eo,r-i
(CONTINl'ED N FAClt 12)

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