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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, May 18, 1918, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

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BEND NEWS-TB
THE WEATHER
J Indiana Thun It s: -wr-?
th: j
AFTERNOON
jTI EDITION
VOL. XXXV, NO. 138.
n
DROP 23 T01S
OP BOMBS 0
GERMAN LIS
British Report Intense Aerial
Activity on Thursday Rail
way Centers, Aerodromes
and Billets Struck.
International New s Service:
LONDON', May IS. More than 23 j
tonn of tombs were dropped by
Pritish airmen on important rail
way center?, aerodromes and billets
behind the German lines on Thurs
day, according to an announcement
made by the British war office.
Thirty Human machines were de
stroyed and rtve mere driven down.
The text of the olfieial report ful-
lows:
"There
on the
balloons
was great aerial activity
1 jth. nur observation
accomplished a largo
amount of registration for the ar
tillery and reported movements of
the enemy is forward areas.
"Our aeroplanes carried out Ion1;
distance reconnaissances, artillery
worn, onnimn.. pumourapmns ana ,
lightinff throughout the day. j
"Over tons of bombs were
dropped on important railway t en- !
ters, aerodromes and billets behind
lhe.nemys lines.
Intciw I'ightin-.
in the morning and again in the j
evening. Thirty hostile machines j
were shot down and live others were j
driven down out of control. In ad- ;
itition two ;rman pl.inrs were!
1'tiiaght down iy our anti-aircraft j
un ami two otner nosiue macnines
v ere i onipellt-d to land behind Our
line.-;. The occupants were captured.
"Fie of our machines are miss-
EM
1
ins:. During the night our a'.r tüers ; The Star, in referring to the mat
dropped 1 1-- ton1: of bombs oil ; t(,r said-
tlillereni targets, livm-iing railway .
stations at Lille, D,.uai and Chaul- 1
lies (all in northern France but r'f -
hmd the German lai'i. and billets j
in the neigni oi noo-i m i.apaume.
I'prniiiic. KoiM'es .ir.-l thr (neks at
Lrucrs (PelgiunO
Fnemy nn-ht iM. rs wore actix e
also one Gc-tha (a tpe of German
airplane) was comp Ib-d to land )e-
hind our lines and the -crew was;
taptured. 1
INTERURBAN FARES
RAISE TO 25 CENTS.
COMMISSION RULES
InterrMti"n;d New S.-rvi - :
I N DIA N A Pi 'LI S. Ind.. Mav 1 j
Inter'irban tares n t h e hie; o.
South Iond and Northern Indian i
railway will ! increa l to two and
one-half ents per miie, jt1 accord
ance with the r;.lin : tb.e st ie
public service ronin'!" Saturday,
r uthorir.r.g the ir.cre.te.
"Tb.e new schedub
rc ir.to etYect as soon
of fare-; wi.l
is we can t
it jrepared
T F. Gro e
the railw i; .
n-l
printed." i!h la red
1
manager
ni"rr.;n:.
ui
AMERICAN PLANE FALLS.
BACK FROM TEUTON LINES
Iafrt.if i 'Hi! N ! S.tvI:
WITH TIU A MF. If I CAN AP.MY
TN FL.W'i'F. May 1. An Amer
ican pursuit aemp'ir.e crashed to
f rt r? t-eh : ti d our ! : n e rt we
Ton! T i t ri-b.t. T
rr ( S' 1 n
M -
: rv. -Pi
'. ! 1
k r. o w n. The ma
insr from a fig lit
b : n w a
oer th- "
lines
S.'vernl Av-ru- in j atru
the Gerir.an L.e- ir. tb.e T'
. n Thus. da r.ighr r.d e ir-
e r. t e red
1 S- -!
F.n'.oy
r.g ar.v
morn ng witb.out
e :i ( i a r. t r
fnrn michir.e
Tb artillety :;rin w
iiht T"
I.
dav. but there was kv.. ''." a'.
.iCti ity.
In the rp;irn of T.u r. e ille tb.,
firing was a mrnii!.
air
ur.
T h a b " e
whether t h
1 i p a t c n
:'b
stat.
itoa:
th
r.p
p'an was killed
i n jure
GERMAN'S AGAIN TRY TO
DROP BOMBS ON PARIS
Ir.ternitiT..il New Servpe:
PATdS. May 1 A German
a :r-
r;a r.e
r. : i: h t
a 1 1 e 1 1 i i m t-' ; i : .i . .
ard s'.- c.e led j
i drop
kirts.
( I - s e . 1
i i. i
forue lo'ui!
1 v
! bi e d-o
! : j. ib; r. e
host :'.e
t Vi r : i
line I cttti-o' i "
r a g;v en su- u ..
it Xailtvi to achieve ns object.
DAY AND Nir.HT FULL LTTASED
WIHE TELLGKAl'IIIC SEI VICE.
" n fn
IV
:fo)
LUUU
POLISH CONTINGENT IN
FRANCE TO AID ALLIES
International News Service;
PARIS. May IS. A Polish con
tinent has just arrived at a French
P'it from the. United States. The
Poles p' traded through the streets
with a brass hand at their head and
received an enthusiastic greeting.
The poles
the allies.
are going to tight for
13 51 FEB
Conscription Likely to Follow
Revelations of Enemy
Propaganda Work.
International News Service:
! LONDON, May 18. Thirteen
I leaders of the Sinn Feiners in Ire
1 land, including the Countess Mark
iewicz (who was implicated in the
Dublin uprising), Prof. deValera (a
member of parliament) and others
equally prominent, have been ar
tested, said a dispatch from Dublin
to the Evening News today.
Five arrests were made in Dublin
,jpon the hpels of lhe proclamation
of (he new lonl iieUtenant. declaring
lhat a (;erman plot had been un-
earthed. Those arrested in the Irish
capitai were: Dr. Dillon, Arthur
Oriffepd. the Countess Markiewicz,
deValera and a Sinn-Fein leader
named Cosgrove.
The Freeman's Journal (of Dub-
lin ), says that conscription will be
i put into effect in Ireland under
j over of the revelations that are
now being made.
j Arrests were made in different
I parts of Ireland. All followed the
revelation that German propaganda
was being literally distributed in
Ireland.
th.. HfivAlnnnntc inHioa
conscription will be applied to Ire-'
iand immediately."
jn his proclamation the lord heu-i
tenant stated that'it had come to the I
j knowledge of the government that
t t i.. . v. . . .
'WHIHK'lIp Cll Ulf mMt'I Hilf I 1 1 1
u i . .v,
I subjects of the Pritish crown in
j t-f.liUld had entered into treasonable
communication with the enemy.
Prof. de"alera, the president of
the Sinn-Feiners, is devotedly fol
lowed hv the members of the organ-
' ;7.atii-n. their cry being "lp Valera."
: Prof. deValera was elected t the
j bouse of commons last summer but
; never tok his seat. After the Dub
lin reolt he was arrested and sen
j tencec to death by a martial court,
i but the fontence was afterwards
commuted
Prof. deValera is said to hae
en born in New York.
( ALLS I'OU VOLUNTARY
I:LISTMKNTS IN AILMV.
L'ND(N. .May 1 Faced with
the po.-Mhility of a revolt in South
Ireland fallowing the arrest of 15
leaders of the Sinn-Feiners. if con-M-ription
is enforced. Sir Edward
short, secretary of state for Ireland,
his issued a proclamation, calling
for Nobuutary enlistments.
Tlie iiroclamation. it was said, was
issued 'in hope that it
would n. !
' necessary to resirt to comp ul
sn" to gain Irish recruits.
In a preious proclamation th?
serretaty had stated that it had
come to the attention of the govern-
:ue nt
that certain subjects of King
' i e ' r g e i n
Ireland had entered into i
ti eas.r.a !le communication
with I
t h--1 C, r t;i ans.
The secretary's announcement
wa the frst intimation that aban-l-onment
of the Irish conscription
plan wa- eep, remotely possible.
While it was issued ostensibly to
fain recruits and block the Germar.-Sinn-Fein
pbd it is considered cer
tain that it -ill result in a lessen-
'.mz of tb.e animosity aroused by the j
possibility of enforced war service.
Meanwhile. sas the Chronicle's ,
Dublin correspondent, "the danger!
of the enforcement of conscription!
may be
tinally and definitely put
aside."
The Freeman's
!.n says:
Journal (of Dub.
"Whib- it
is possible
a few fool-
ib i'Tnns may
have conspired to
invoke German aid, the Iri.-h peo
I '.e. notwithstanding the provoi a -f.or.s
of Kngland. are not pro-German."
agi.d riTi.i: dii.
itert.ati ui il Nonn Service:
SANDFSKY. . May 1 . Mm-
. w p.rvant Carroll, one of hio's
I
o;.'.t citizens, died today at his
f.. i !u home near Ii lin Heigiits. He
was lu3 3 cars old.
fPALV
MEN, GERMAN
PLOT 111 IRELAND
r
i
J Ol
American Heroes Decorated by France
it
:'
4
:4
V.
;"
4
i'l
Vi
,- f
.?.v.yy "yxoflsv'.v .-W -f- y
' At Vy1l ' ' s ' s
i l k S vif ' - " -
$ i- (
P
$ . - Z) ' !? jc x
. a. ; ..x - .. ; s- . , . . - y i
Gen. Gaucher, of the French army, decorating an American oflicer
and private for bravery under tire.
Sunday School Meeting
in City Next Month
to Bring 5,000 Here
Tne convention of the Indiana
Sunday School association, which !
it i cntv. n.i T..no n 1 !
. . ., -ML1 . .1- .
and IS, will bring to the city about
:'-000 representatives of the largest
and most compactly formed organ
ization in the state. Word to tho
local committees from the head
quarters of the association in In
dianapolis is that while attendance
of 5.000 is expected, the estimate
cent years, this number will not be
in South Bend at any one time
Many of the visitors will be here for
only one day, but perhaps o.OOO
or more will be here for the last two
days, while the largest crowds are ;
expected on the second day.
The convention here opens tha
5 4th year of the association's his
tory. It is strongly organized with
5,400 Sunday schools which are
grouped in township organizations,
the township units forming county
associations and at the head of tho
whole body is the state association,
which is a part of the international
association, including the counties
of the United States. Canada and
Mexico, and the world association
includes all lands where the Protes
tant Sunday school is known.
Sunday School Work.
Out of Indiana's total population j
of 2, TOM, S 7 H, there are ."Sn,7i:i men,
women and children enrolled in the '
Sunday scnoois ana ever anoami
an average or i.i answer me,
call
of the Sunday school bells. It
I - A! 1
leisures '. , 0 4 omcers ami icacners :
to administer the business of these
schools and instruct the pupils. The i
course of instruction, based entire- j
!y upon the scriptures, is as careful-
ly grade! as is the instruction in ,
the public schools. Pupils from the
Sunday schools are graduated into
church membership and last year ,
-
ßQLSH EVI K I CAPTURE
rnnM TIIDlC
uANU rnUlVl I Ui1r0
j Ir.tfrr.ation.il ij errue:
PASLF. M"ay IS. Russian bolsh
ikl forces have capture. I P.aku
j from tht Turks, despite the resist
ance or lurKisn reiuiorcements xnai
j were defending the place, said a dis
' patch from Constantinople today.
! Paku is in the Caucasus
and lis
j in the heart of a rich oil producing
J c'istrict. It is about 123 miles from
the Turkish border and comprises
part of the Russian territory th.it
Turkish forces invaded, with th-.
sanction of Germany after the ho'. -sheviki
had made a separate pea
with Germany,
SOUTH BEND, INDIANA, SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1918.
FW
n
n
ii
v .
A
''v
W ? A
X.AA
i;
t
1
s5
- ii
A
21, ?.ö 1 were entered on the church
rolls, yet retain their membership
in
the schools, for no one is ever
. IIa 1- ..V
too young or too old to exhaust the
instruction that is offereel in the
scliools.
While the Indiana asseciatiou
covers a very wide scope both in
its activities and memberships, it is
entirely supported by voluntary
contributions. The cost of adminis
tering the affairs of the state organ
ization is met by gifts frmn men and
women of means and by pledges
from schools and school depart
ments. Lach school supports itself.
It trains its own teachers, some of
whom hace been in service for 40
years or more, yet there is no record
of one of the teachers ever receiv
ing any pay for service.
FOREMAN OF SHIPYARD
TO ADDRESS WORKERS
5
' i
li
Si
i-
ti
h; 7 TU
n
V1
i J. i Johnson, former bns.
of
I ways at a Portland. )re . shipyard.
S h is been, summoned to the Atlantic
; coast by the national service section
i of the emergency Meet corporation
to address the hipw orkers of
the
of
Atlantic coast on the necessity of
speeding up their work ro help win
the war. Johnson was forn-.rlv- a
minister, but resigned to elite the;
shipyards.
PIT ü re
i i öl 1 n f
f
A ti
. j tJMjt ii tifniri 1 1 ' rT- -- iitii mir TrVmTf
PI
n
L3 w Li
!GEi.IIii
i
IYBEHEW:
GERMAN DRIVE
i
!
Growing Intensity of Gun Fire
in Arras-Givenchy Sec
tor Indicates Possible
Scene of Thrust.
International News Service:
LONDON, May IS. The growing
intensity of the gun tire in the Arras
Givenchy sector of the western front
the only stretch of the front
j where the Pritish first lines have
' not been chanced since March 21
! causes the belief that Gen. Otto von
Pelow's army will be the next that
i is called on to strike against the de
j fenses of P.ethune, Souchez and the
i St. Kloi coal fields.
' At the same time the Germans
j would attempt to capture the salient
' between the Lys and Somme rivers
(the Arras salient.)
Gen. von Pelow's army has not
suffered heavily, having participated
only in the abortive thrusts in the
Arras zone early in April, which
were decisively stopped. Then the
Germans switched their pressure
northward against Armentieres and
the sector held by the Portuguese.
Gen. von Arnim's army group had
to provide the shock troops for the
attacks on the northern end of the
line.
Import Weighty Att.acks.
Reports that Field Marshal von
Mackensen had taken over com
mand of von Helow's army group
are current. If they are true, they
indicate that attacks between Arras
and Givenchy would be of a weighty
nature and not mere demonstra
tions. Von Mackensen would be
called to the western front only as
a last resort because of his fued
with von Hindenburg and the crown
prince.
Aerial observation, however,
proves that the bulk of the German
reserves are still in the area be
tween Moreuil and Albert. If the
enemy should attempt a turning
movement, using von Sutler's army
on the Somme, von Pelow's forces
undoubtedly would be required for
a direct frontal attack between
Arias and Givenchy while von Arn
im's forces might he called in tcj
hammer the Belgians near the North
sea. Unusual artillery activity has
just been reported from the sector
of Nieuport. A terrific offensive,
more powerful than that of March,
would not surprise military critics.
Delay Adds t Font.
The longer tho Germans wait be
fore striking another blow the more
men they can put in the field, con
sisting not only of new divisions
that never have been used but of
divisions of rested men.
It is believed that the Germans
would not have risked their whole
future by launching their offensive
in March if they had not feared the
striking power of the Americans.
FACTORY FOREMAN HELD
DOWN PRODUCTION BY
DISCHARGING EXPERTS
Iiitern;ifion.il News Serviep;
CLFVFLAND. O.. May IS. John
Galley Is held here today by federal
tlieials on the charge of aiding the
enemy and probably will be intern
ed. Galley was foreman at a local
factory which is engaged in turning
out castings and is said to have
wed down production in his de-
I artment to such a degree that his
employers finally appealel to fed
eral officials to investigate his ac
tions Galley, who is n German sub
ject, managed to cut production in
bis department by discharging" skill
ed workmen, and placing unskilled
help in their places. As fast as the
new ran learned Vi- trade well.
Galley would rind some cause for
letting them go and replacing them
v ith new men.
Galley, who is unnatura'ized. car
ried a loaded revolver, ard this, it
is pointed out. is sufficient cause to
warrant his internment, under the
president's proclamation regarding
the carrying cf arms by enemy
aliens.
AUSTRIA CALLS FOUR
NEW CLASSES TO ARMS
I ii t -r ! ii t i'-ru. 1 Nov S-;-vi.- :
ROM F. Mav IV Austria has
tailed four new classes to the colors
in preparation for a renewed drive
en the Italian front, the Gicrnale
D'ltalia. learns.
WITH ALL Tili: LOCAL NEWS.
a nliyspapei: Fon Tim home
if ? i t
1
G
erman
Active on
Hazeb
roue
I li ten; a t in n il News Service:
LONDON, May 18. Heavy cannonading: developed during
the night in the 'Givenchy and Robecq sectors ot the Flanders
battle front, the war oiiice announced today. Big German guns
were active also in the Lens and Hazebrouck areas.
Aside from the activites there was nothing else to report, the
war oiiice said.
The text of the olricial report fol
lows: "There was considerable artillery
activity during the night on both
tides between Givenchy and Robeep
"German artillery has shown
some activity in the sectors of Lens,
Hazebrouck and Ypres.
"Aside fr"m this there is nothing;
else to report."
American Shoots
Down Two Planes
Within a Minute
titernational News Service:
WASHINGTON, May IS. Two
within one minute by Capt. Feter-
son of the American aviation corps,
Gen. Pershing reported in his daily
communique to the war department
today. In Iorraine patrolling was
active, says the communique and an
increase in artillery tire was noted.
The text of the communique fol
lows: "American official communique:
"Headquarters American Kxpedi-
tionary Koroes. .May 16. section A
In Lorraine patrolling was active
find there was again increase of ar
tillery tire. Otherwise the day was
uiet at points occupied Ly our
troops.
"Section B Particulars concern
ing bringing: down hostile airplanes
at about noon May 13, previously
reported, vwien aviators were wait
ing for French general who was
coming to confer decorations, are
s follows: While waiting, Capt.
Teterson. rrade an ascent and en
countered two German planes and
shot down both within one minute,
! bring SO shfts at first and 1 1 at sec
i ond. First plane burst into (lames
' before hitting ground and wings of
i second were seen to crumple up
when nearii.g earth. No definite in
formation concerning third hostile
plane reported brought down.
"It is now determined that our air
plane, reported yesterday as having
accidentally fallen within our lines
rorth of Toul, was shot down, prob
ably by hos-.ile anti-aircraft gun."
U..S. WANTS HER DEAD
AS VICTORY FRUITS
AM
.vi''-
5C ZjC:
j A
V
f:M"
,.r.
1f
In a speech befojt- a m--t:ng of
the Inter-Allied club in Paris, where
Field Marshal Jor'fre presidnd. Gen.
Johnson Hagood, ef the American
army, told the members of Amer
ica's aim in the war. He said:
("America is fighting for humanity,
! for democracy, for the rights i f the
world; not for Prussian indemnities
and annexations." Paris repeated
hi? final clause with admiration. He
said: "We shall stay here till the
allies win the war. Then we shall
go home r-nv'ty banded, unless per
haps, we tale Lack our dead."
JL.iJk3
Ü
Ui
Gu
ns
Lens and
k Li
BOARD OF WORKS MEN
RETURN FROM ST. LOUIS
James N. Luther, superintendent
of the city water department, Gil
bert A. Klliott, president of the
board of works, and Harvey Hos-
tiser and John F. De Haven, mem
v . . . , c iKn . . . , l - i ... a . . . . a
I'tIS Hi lilt i Ol tSl IHMIU, I VI III IIVU
Saturday morning from St. Iouis,
.Mo., where they attended the na
tional water works convention in
session during the week. Mayor
Carson, who accompanied the party
to St. Iouis, weni on to Camp Shelby
to visit his son, Capt. Clark Carson
of the Fl 7th field artillery. The
mavor will return Wednesday.
' UU IM U n t I t oMIr OnUWo
UP WELL ON VOYAGE
WASHINGTON. May IS. An of
ficial report Friday on the behavior
of the concrete ship Faith on her
second trip off the Pacific coast in
a strong wind and choppy sea, says
the vessel is believed to be fully
equal, if not superior, to any Fteel
shift of the same size and equal
power. The Faith soon wiil under
take her maiden voyage with cargo.
NEW RUMOR SEYDLER'S
CABINET HAS RESIGNED
International News Service:
G FN FY A. May IS. It is again
rumored in diplomatic circles in
Vienna that the von Seydler cabinet
has resigned and that the minister
of railways has been commissioned
to form a new Austrian ministry,
said the Muencher Post today.
G
T
IDS OUT STIFF
Judge Advocate's Department
at Camp Sheridan Reports
on Over 200 Cases.
International Nevi S.-rvi'-o ;
CAMP SHLRJDAN. Montgomery,
Ala.. May IS. That Lieut. Hubert
J. Turaey and his judce advocate'3
department has not been loafing is
indicated by 1100 oourtmartial find
ings just reviewed and made public
at Camp Sheridan. The findings ar-i
fill from general courts and have no
connection with the summary
court's findings in unimportant
cases. The report does no: indicate
what jeiiod the courtmartials rou-r.
The heaviest sentences were five
ears in Fort Leavenworth and i:s-honorabb-
discharge, jriven three
men, charged with robbery. These
were Pvt. F.ruce Davis, L'ISth field
artillery; Pvt. Harry Maxwell. l Jth
field artillery, and Pvt. Llmtr
Glitsch, 14Mh infantry. Five sen
tences of two years were given other
men charged with robbery, and a
number of si.orter sentences were
given men.
Seven men charged w.th forgery
were given sentences totaling 15
years, while a number of others re
eejvd shorter sentences. Four men
jwere given one year each for sleep
i intr on post, and two or.e year each
j for breaking confinement. One man
! was- sentence. 1 t two years for be.ng
absent without leave. All th other
findings were for hort t-enf.nc s.
GI i; t.OO0 IWK)KS.
I r:terr. ati r.nl Nf-n i-rvlre:
CLF;YK1VND. O, May IT.
Cleveland people nave donated
( i 1 o b'ioks to the soldiers, which is
to place this city
st in g:!
per capita in the "Rooks for Sol
d;trt ' Uriv.
I
s
MÄHT
JAIL SENTENCES
v rr.er. I,iut Michigan I ;;r tö
richt oxf opt hf'WfT'1 in f T r e na
cast portion, somewhat oo.-.Vr; Sun
(?,iv fair warmer in wt rcrtion.
PRICE TWO CENTS
V)
p-
PLACE li SO
Kaiser's Spokesman Stakes
Hopes on the Impend
ing "Events in the
West."
Intel natior .: NVv Servi.e:
A MST FL DAM. Mav 1 v "I
am still optimi!ic t-nouih to
believe that peace will ciue tb;s
y.-ar," said Count on Hert'.mg.
the German ha tu lb r. in an
interview published in .1 Buda
pest newspaper, a cc ri! m- to
advices received here to'.ay. Thf
interview continued.
"We want nothmc ' ut a pbice
in the s.m. ur a gi e-menti
for the future haw m: been
aggressive in characier. W
are tirni iri "tiuden- that
events in the wet bn: g is
nearer the end."
The rh.imr'il-'r al.-o com
mented at lenuOi up.-n the im
provement i" tel.itians of
Au-tro-H unga 1 v in a propa
gandist nature.
U. S. Casualty List
Internet lot: a I .'n .vrvfie:
WASHINGTON. May lv Theje
were only names on t he casualty
list issued today by the war depart
ment. Tvvelw- of these were miss
ing in fiction, tbiee lulled in action,
three died of wounds, four died of
disease. fie weie Wouiubd sere'..
nine wounde.l slightly, two were
made prisoner and one w . a "
wounded.
Tb.e death in action of Maj. Alex
ander Rasmus. -n. of Sherwood.
b)re.. is repcuted. i'ir:-T Lieut. Ab
raham I bVuiluii. Nr-waik. N. J..
is j eported as a pr.son.u-.
KILLFD IN A FTP N Mai. Alex
ander Uasiuus-s. ti. Hfir-rw-'od ''re.;
pvts. Joeph H. Lietz.in. Hammond.
j Ind.; Joeph A. Zihala. Newa: k. N.
J.
DIFD OF DISLASi: N i:' I.ucv
N. Fletcher, ronoml. lb; Sert.
D.in M. Storir.c, .Mep. ':v.:r.. Wi :
Pvts. Ralph A. Johns. .n. lbcasfon.
Tex.; .P'hn P.efse II"!iv Grow-. La.
DIFD F W- iFN DS ... Pvf .
Gharbs W. In!1(1';rl:. Pai: .
France; Marvin W. Smith. Koh
kn nir. Mo.; Cr' ppe Vi-r i. Fair
Haven, Vt.
WOFNDFD SF.Vi:i:r.LV Pvt.
Flward J. f'artrr. f'hU ."o; Philip
Frost. Pradford. V. ; Howr H. Mc
Anelly. e'lncir.mt i. la.: Harry L.
Milbr. Iloj.kins. .Vinn : I-mcnt W.
l''!f:' IVif rs n. ."". J
I WOFNDFD SLIGHTLY - '-"
William Thompson. B:: 'o'.. o.nr, ;
iCpi. Herbert Gübs. Houurv.'b.
! Mas. ; pvts. Rov . P.oor.e. ',tr,.,:i
I Smith. Al.n.e.i,. Calif.; Jar.es
' Johns-, n. I'a -.no'.i- S'at.on. Ky.;
' Rodr.ev M' ' !'. ;: .. Sokron,
; Cah f.: James- G P. pes. N- rth V n-
jice. 111.; Jr.- S'-hrrT-b-r. FhiCatT.
j Raymond Williams. L hr-i urg. Ind.;
! Kdw-ird Wr.od, Alston. ,-.
j W'll'NbKb (I'e-r.e t ' n k T. r W n )
i I'vt. P.oyd M Gilb-p ' . Fn.'-n S"-)rk
: Yards, lud; napobs, In 5 .
M I SS I N I N A "f I ' N L - -1.
fShern.an de Mor . hi' ag--; S-: i.A.
J Joseph J. N'r'bn. H.r-f";d. ('-"..:
i Cpl Joseph Sab tir.i. Kro"k!v r. N.
!y.; I'Vts. L'ste,- R. Ciuk, N'-W Mi-
jveri. Conn.: George '.. iv-r, N-'"
i Haven. Conn.: F: r.o' I. Martino,
Hartfor-1, Cor.n.; He r'. e-rt V. John
son. New Haven. Cnn.; John T.
' Mc Car tin New II a -en. On--..; AP'-rt
:L. Mason. Fnnhip. N. Y.; 1?
I R. Mason. G iir.e ille, I'll.; John
!J. Mil m, South r.'i-'.ub Mas.; .us
!t;n M. Re-idy. J. r-"y '"V:. . N J.
I PRISoXFRS (Not j :ev;'.us;y I'
I r,r,rte- i MISSING Ie ;t AbTi.
iham J. Gordon. Newark. N J.: Pvt.
Paul L. Hoble-, H .'in
Neb
FIGHTING INTERMITTENT
ON AMERICAN FRONT
1 1:1 with ' tih: ' amkrigan armt
'iN FP.ANCF Mav lv 'T .ffhtir.n
j wa. limited tday to re.-Anr.aisanc
.an' intermittent artillery a'tivity."
t-avs the latest American : itl v ar
Istafemer r. -Th r" -s :n-r i--rj
i serial r-rtlvity north of Toul and la
i Lorraine."
I j) o
Jlin
III Oil 1 A
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