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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, October 05, 1918, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1

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TEWB
AFTERNOON
Ji EDITION
Till: Ui: ATI IHK.
1 1 1 1 i.i ii. :
.1
VOL. XXXV, NO. 278.
o)
i
n
U u
NX
7
Munitions Plant
Wiped Out by
Toll May
inrprrtttlon.il NV Service:
NEW YORK. Oct. 5. All
Island, across the river from Morgan, N. J., were ordered to
evacuate by federal authorities.
A few minutes after noon today the greatest explosion that
has yet occurred, shook the lower part of New York as
though by an earthquake.
NEW YORK, Oct. 5. With a new series of explosions which
rocked the countryside for miles around, the great conflagration
at the munition loading plant of T. A. Gillespie Co., at Morgan,
N. J., 20 miles from New York, which mav result in a death toll
f over loo persons, was still raging at noon todav.
Estimates of the loss of life reach as high as 200 and reports
or the number of injured. are vague. No responsible person or anv
of the military authorities who have taken charge of the situa
tion win auempt to deny or confirm the current casualty reports.
Fourteen bodies had been recover- ! I .
rl up to noon and-5cores of person'.
Mill unaccounted for at that tlmo
were belieel to be dead in the
ruins.
Martial law has been declared in
the stricken area under the com
mandant of the department of the
-ast.
New F plosions liosin.
The new seriös of explosions he
Kan at 10; lo a. m., and made the
ountry mithin a radius of :'( miles
of More. m tremble with the concus
sion. The terrific detonation was dis
tinctly felt in New York city wherr
the occupants of tlio city hall were
thrown into confusion when the of
th ffrcat doors were violently blown
open.
Four explo.-ions occurred between
':10 ami lD:::o ;t. m.. the lat more
terrific than all the others.
Lieut. William Kennel, military
attache at the citv hall here said
ie was of the opinion that the new
explosions were caused by addition-
ai iinn nsiii'iines 01 me .MorK.ci
plant blowing up.
lio. riant IVstrojnl.
All reports re eied indicate that
thf entire war plant, which com
prises over a hundred buildings
alued at approximately f 1 .mOO.000,
will be entirely destroyed.
Many transports and barges al
te oly loaded with munitions for the
.Milt-man owisci ior. es hp sati ,
t
i.y the predried prec a u t iona ry ! ... ho wn by the fact that the Ameri
plans nia.b- by the Fnited States aMS in .some instances had their
t O.I St
guard command.. nt in this
district.
A stat.
!
f ixts today '
of
te rror
through a di-trict within a radius
of 1o miles around
Morgan. Men.
women and children are
:leeing and
entire towns ar beinc: evacuated.
I:i:.-rnf iervd Nrn Senior:
NKW VORK. o,-t. ." With a
military censorship established, th'
unofficial toll of 'he trriiic sorirs of
e los;ons wh.ich wrecked the muni
tions p!.;it of the T. A. ;:!Iespie
I.o i.liiic Cn. at Morgan. N. J., was
oda placed at riht known dead,
er Sft tnisi:u' an.l more than a
hundred Injured.
A rm
Mthorkifs w
t "0 1V o er
the fire s'.ept and shell torn scene
of disaster soon after the catastro
phe occ irred. r fud farly today to
cie out an- information pending
an offb-ifl -'.'t er.t Liter in th"i
day. Telephone communication
with o ith Am', oy. near Morgan,
has V-een interrupted. The unofSVHl
...........
:i" ! rrceted from ;
'f Perth Ambov. i
th. e po'ice (
New York IVrK IUast.
Inter;. itter
epbions of the
VV rec KCti !!!'!!' 1 I
continuIr.tr and
iiolir.sj
a r
ra gi n
':re s
ui'olin.g'
still
in
. o rn e of t e
la t b.e.i v e p!o
whi(
rocke 1 novtliern New Jersey
v;ii distinctly felt in New York
and
citv.
r-K curred at I
a. :v.. this morning.
A w a reroute
large pjantit.
at that t:me
shOOk th1 s;;
na cazi::e containing a
' of T. N. T. blew up
Several lof-r blasts
-rounding countrv be-
T O V or U .
t v er n
a n d
Reports rerejvrd in Perth Ambov ' Obvjously they were killed as they
early today m:.1 that pr.n tica'dy th ' advanced and not in a single in-e.-'tire
pl.inf o' t!.e company was stance did I 5ee where a man had
wrecked or d im.ued. One hundred ' been killed while moving back
and r'ftv bui'dm gs comprise
plant, which nT-ipirs practicilly
the
ths
whole town o:
mated value of
Morgan. The estl
mc .t and build-
iocs is
All road
r i n n
to t!".e devastated
scene
(CONTINCKD '".V TW.il EICHT.),
DAY AND NIGHT FULL LEASKI
WIKE TELEGKAI'IIIC SKKVICi:
iy
EXPLOSIONS
II BI
at Morgan, N. J.
Blasts and Death
Reach 100.
resident of Tottenville SIaI
Yankee Valor is
Put to Test in
Capture of Farm
Great Hive of German Ma
chine Guns Taken by
Gritty Americans.
ijy ni;itT roll.
IutrriutiMii.il News Service:
WITH T1IC AMERICAN ARMY
ON TIIK ItHITlSIl FRONT, Oct. 5.
(Juillemont farm will not be soon
forgotten by the American troops
wno fought there with great valor
in the recent drive. It was a veri-
tabb- hiv
e or uvrnian machine num.
New York troops charged the
nests with band grenades and one
patrol. composed of eight New
Yorkers, captured six machine guns.
The.e men were driven off three
times by superior forces, but always
returned.
The fierceness of the fiirhtintr is
The
packs shot half :iw.-iv Th,- dc
were wounded not only in the front
i, i,t iT-, th vou. -oii ni-iinii.
idieatintr thnt tu .rm.m
- - - ...... Vv 4 V i ('II
all sides of them. In sidte of this
fact the Americans gained all their
objectives.
Husky Tennesseeans and North
'arolians with the New Yorker
went into the enemy dugouts sing
ing "Swanee River."
ne American tank caught fire in
the action, but all of the Americans
escaped. One athletic American
leaped headlong through a hole
which had been torn In the side of
the tank by a shell.
An American sergeant, although
wounded 10 times, rushed and kill
ed a (lorman, after which he faint
ed. He was rescued and carried to
safety by stretcher bearers
U.NTKALI.W COIXlM-:ii
I'KAISKS AMKICIC.WS.
International New Sei vi. o:
WITH TIIK AMERICAN
ARMY
ox TIIK RRITISH FRoNT. Oct. 5.
Th heroism and t-:i!lnitrv r,f tU
- - ---------- ..v..v J V , V V
American troops from New York.
who cooperated with the Austral-
ians in Sunday's Irive is tctitied to
by an Australian colonel, who wears
a Victoria Cross and who made a
personal reconnaissance of the
battle field.
This colonel found that the
Americans met with the heaviest
opposition and were enfiladed by
machine pun tire.
"'I saw a larce number of them
hing dead upon the ground but the
faces of all were toward the front.
ward."
The colonel added that he was
convinced the New Yorkers had
done all that was humanly possible,
for brave men to do. Their gal
lantry in this connection mut stand
out thronen all time in the history
'f America, he concluded.
IRE USES
URGENT WEED
FOR IR WORK
House Committee Will Report
Bill For Nearly 200 Mil
lions Dollars For Next
Six Months.
BY J. HA TIT CAMPBELL.
International News Service:
WASHINGTON, Oct. 5. So seri
ous has become the utter lack of
adequate housing for essential
workers In the war industry centers
of the United States, that the out
put of munitions necessary for
American soldiers overseas is being
greatly retarded, the war, navy and
labor departments have informed
the house committee on public
grounds and buildings.
Chairman Clark of the committee,
today stated that as a result, that
not later than next Tuesday he
would report a bill embodying es
timates aggregating $194,607,000 the
government has asked for housing
during the next six months.
Accompanying the bill will be a
report of the committee in which
will appear the declaration of MaJ.
Hayden Aymes, chief of the small
arms division of the war depart
ment that "living conditions at Ed
dystone, near Philadelphia, are so
frightful that we are one million)
rifles behind at what is the largest
rifle plant in the entire world."
Main Itiflc Plant.
"This is our principal rifle plant,"
MaJ. Aymes informed the commit
tee, in speaking of the Eddystono
rifle plant. "There we are producing
5,000 rifles a day whereas we should
be producing 5,500 a day. There wo
are ?hort 1,000 men owing to the
living or housing conditions. This
does not mean that anybody has to
go without a rifle, for we contem
plate overtaking our entire rifle pro
gram in the spring of 1919, but we
ought to have 1,000,000 more rifles
than we have.
Otto M. Eidlitz, director of the
bureau of housing of the department
of labor, has told the committee that
during the next six months tempor
ary housing facilities at least must
be provided, as a most pressing war
necessity."
"Win the War" Is First.
"The first idea is to win the war,"
Eidlitz said, "and not what becomes
of what we use to win the war. We
have got past the time when we can
give too much thought to what Is
going to happen to war funds. We
must first get the funds and quick
ly. "War material must be delivered
to the American forces overseas in
full meawure by next spring and
must be kept at the highest rate of
production next summer. To etteet
this manufacturing plants turning
out war products in this country
must bo kept running at full capac
ity by the end of this winter."
Eidlitz said that, therefore, prop
er facilities for thute engaged in
such manufacturing must be com
pleted and ready for occupancy six
months from now, whether they be
temporary or permanent. He esti
mated that thu $ 114, bu". 000 tanked
lor as the minimum lump sum ur
gently needed to provide war work
ers with housing cummtiisuuit w itn
the American war program.
Eidlitz explained that the navy
now intends to build a storage ware
house distributing center, embrac
ing 4u permanent store houses at
Philipsc'urg, N. J., which would nt
cttsitate housing for l.Ttiü persons.
NectK Cinm Constantly.
"This means the building of
houses, recreation halls, cafeterias
and other structures at a cost of
C,uC'0,oca," he said. He pointed ot
proper housing or home facilities
for war worKers necessitate the ex
penditure of IJ.ot'O.OOü for l.TvO
pt rsons.
Richard S. Childs, war depart
ment housing representath e, in
formed the Clark committee, that
Col. Jarnieson. chief of the produc
tion division o the war department,
had served notice that by next April
we. will have to be in France with
our entire army and at that time,
we will have to furnish our own
supplies and equipment in full as
our allies will then be no longer able
to make up deficiencies and our
needs will be great."
Childs said that this " means that
in the plant in which we are trying
to put on the three-shift basis. -.000
or 3, 000 workers will have to be
brouKht into town where 1.000
were necessary before."
SOUTH BE! r DIANA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1918.
S
It's Up to YOU to Avoid
Epidemic of Influenza;
Observe These Rules
The avoidance of an epidemic of
influenza in South Hend is now plain
ly up to the individual, according to
a statement issued Saturday by Dr.
Charles E. Hansel, president of the
board of health.
There is not now such an epidemic,
the doctor asserts, although there
are isolated cases of influenza, and
if the proper precautions are taken
the disease can be prevented from
becoming epidemic.
Dclinos Symptons.
The statement issued by Dr. Han
sel Includes suggestions for avoid
ing the disease.
It follows:
"The term influenza or grip, which
is the same thing, has always been
rather loosely applied and while it
is sometimes impossible to differen
tiate a mild case of influenza from a
severe 'cold.' yet the two diseases
are different in origin. "Colds' may
be caused by a variety of organisms
while influenza is always caused by
the bacillus of influenza. Spanish
Influenza does not differ from the
type which has come in epidemics
previous to this except perhaps in
its virulence.
"The mild form as stated before
resembles an ordinary cold, but the
severe form begins abruptly with a
chill or chilly sensation. Then
there is a fullness of the head fol
lowed by a discharge from the nose,
cough, fever, pains or aching in the
head, chest, back and extremities;
occasionally there is nausea or
vomiting; weakness or prostration
is" marked and is a very prominent
symptom. In three days or a week
the symptoms will disappear unless
there are complications. The com
plications are: Pneumonia, bron
chitis, abscesses in the head or ears.
Infection of the heart valves or
muscle, rheumatism and rarely an
involvement of the kidneys.
Regulations on Hard
Coal Fixed by Hardy
Regulations regarding the distrl-
bution of the limited quantity of
hard coal which South Bend will re- j
ccive this winter were threshed out !
at a conference of the coal dealers
and the county fuel administrator,
U P. Hardy, Friday night.
It developed at the meeting that
about one-half of the anthracite coal
allotted to Fquth Bend has already
been received and distributed and
the prospects for receiving the en
tire allotment are not bright. Month
ly shipments are limited to one
twelfth the allotment.
The uncertainty of re-ceiving even
the limited allotment rrompted the
following regulations: No more than
two tons of hard coal will be de
livered for a stove at one time, and
no more than four tons for a fur
nace. Consumers will not he per
mitted to place an order with more
than one dealer, and dealers are not
allowed to accept orders until they
have the assurance that the coal is j
shipped or will be shipped.
IToposo to Help Needy.
The administration proposes, when
assistance is rendered to give prefer
ence to the most needy. Considera
tion will be given first to old people,
families where there are small chil
dren, and where there is sicknes. ;
The cooperation of generous hearted i
citizens will be needed if the admin
istration is to carry out its plans. '
Mr. Hardy advises those who can
afTord it most to buy soft coal stoves
at once for all the requirements can
not be met. At present there is a
good supply of soft coal on the mar- ;
ket and a great shortage is not an- .
YOU MUST REGISTER BY 5 O'CLOCK
NEXT MONDAY NIGHT TO VOTE
AT NOVEMBER ELECTION
If you would vote for congressman, state and
county orikials to be elected this fall, you must reg
ister on or before Oct. 7. at the county court house.
Don't forget this. Do it NOW. It is not alone your
privilege, it is your DUTY. It is silly to tight to
make the world safe for democracy and then not
practice it at home.
PRACTICE DEMOCRACY
25
b u u u LL'
Treatment iTOsrrirxMl.
"The treatment is absolute rest in
bed, fresh air. cold applications if
the fever is high, light diet, plenty
of water, keeping the bowels open
and such remedies for special symp
toms as a physician might suggest.
"We are not now experiencing an
epidemic, but it will be up to the in
dividual whether v e have one or
not. If each of us does his part we
will have but a comparatively small
number of cases, but if we are care
less or indifferent there will be many
cases with an accompanying large
number of deaths.
"The following precautions are
suggested:
"1. Avo4l ovcr-hcating living
apartments.
'2. No children with colds
should attend school, and if they
should como, the teacher should
send tlicm home.
"3. No workers with colds
should go to the factory, storv
or places where they will conic
In contact with others. The
employers should see that this
rule Is enforced.
"1. No one with a oId should
attend any public gathering such
as (heaters, churches, etc. Ticket
sellers and ushers can help
hero.
"5. Do not visit any one who
has n cold or is sick from any
acute illness. lamilies are re
quested to allow none to enter
if there is any acute illnos
within the home.
"0. Upon the first symptoms
of a severe cold or Infection,
the patient should go to bod and
call his physician.
"7. When coughing or sneez
ing a handkerchief should Im
held to the face to avoid sprink
ling the air with contamina
tion." ticipated. Where hard coal fires
: mus;t be liurned the administration
asks that they not
he started until
cold weather.
Any violation of the regulations
should be reported to Mr. Hardy
who can be reached by telephone.
Bell 80 5, Home 1 S 0 5. The name of
the person reporting and full in
formation must be given to secure
investigation by the administration.
SNEEZING WORSHIPPERS
WILL BE SENT HOME
Intermti'Miil News Servi'-e:
CHICAGO. Oct. r. Chicago
churches will be combed by the po
lice department tomorrow and wor
shippers who sneeze and cough will
be asked to leae at once. Th's is
the latest action of local authori
ties in their war on the Spanish in
fluenza epidemic. Churches which
are not provided with proper facil
ities for ventilation will closed,
under police orders.
am, iiomi: ;imSMi;
TO MKITT SUNDAY at oi;.
All members of the home
guards are requested to. mf( at
the Y. M. C. A. Sunday after
noorr at 1 o'clock to attend the
funerals of Pvt. Ira A. Noland
and Pvt. Walter Weltzien. Th
entire regiment will attend.
AND REGISTER TO VOTE.
a MiAvsiwrrr. kok um homk
with a 1. 1. thi: local m:w.
Jli
1
IKS ADVANCE
SIL RAGING
Gain Considerable Ground in
Beth Champagne and Ar
gonne Forest in Cooper
ation With French.
BY NKWTOX C. PAKKK.
International News Service:
WITH TIIK AM K RICA N ARMY
NORTHWEST OK YKRHrX
(night). Oct. 4. The new American
attack, which began this morning
over a 20-milo front just oast of tho
Art;or ne forest, carried the American
line forward from two to live kilo
metres and put the Americans
astride the Kriemhelde line.
Americans captured Heenes. fho
hery. La Forges arl Fioville. the
last ramed village heing onlv four
jand three-quarters miles from the
i important German stronghold at
j Gran,1. Pre. Hill So. :4 was storm
ed. The assault was launched under
cover of thick mist at 5:T.n o'clock
this morning and was carried out in
the ?. ce of desperate tire from Gor
man artillery and machine guns.
The pressure centered in the Aire
and I-indon valleys.
UAU Hanks Reach lane.
Tarks and airplanes supported th
advancing infantry.
Ioth Hanks of the Americans at-
tacking army reached the Kriem-
helde line.
During the evening the Germans
made vicious counter attacks and
bombarded the valleys very heavily
with gas shells.
All of the counter thrusts broke
down before our defense.
As the Americans progressed, the
Germans began felling trees nn 1
placing wire entanglements through1
the branches for the protection of
maenme gun nests.
The success of the new American
attack, so brilliantly carried out.
gives the Americans important ad
vantages. Hill No. 24n. which is now in
American hands, dominates the sur
rounding territory for a great dis
tance. It lies just north of Kxer
mont. Seven German airplanes were
shot down in the sky battles, whieh
accompanied the land engagement.
Try to Sao Communications.
The Germans put up the most
stubborn resistance for they are
strivirg desperately to save the lin0
of communication that are now
threatened by th American and
French advance.
Troops from Wisconsin, Virginia,
West Virginia and Pennsylvania as
well as regulars under (Jen. Pullard
took part.
The attack extended all the vr'
from the Meuse river to the point
where th1 American and French
armies join us.
The infantry dash was precede.
by heivy artillery fire which began
at midnight. It gradually increased
in intensity until Id minutes before
the "zero hour." when a terri'ic bar
rage v.-as laid down.
Surpr!-o lrm;ini.
The preliminary bombardment
did net extend over the entire front
of attiek. but was centered imme
diately wpt of the Meuse river. Th-1
infantry onrush on the rest of t!v
front came as a surprise to th- Ger
man. The honor of taking Chehery an 1
I. a Forces (north of Aprerr.orit" f. n
to Pennsylvania troops. '
Fleville was not rapture. 1 until
bite in the day. There i.--s bitter
fightlnt? around that villi ere.
Smashing all German resistance,
the Americans pushed through to
the Bf'is de Fays, where they began
( CONTINUED N P.VI K FMHTO
GASLESS .SUNDAY!
Tomorrow K Another. Despite
AH Humor to the Contrary.
Despite all rumors to the con
trary, I-. P Hardy, county fuel
administrator, wishe it strong
ly emphasized that ca Ies.- Sun
days are still in effect and will
continue to until further no
tice. Thr -:'"ual r,Armi'
L.'jed to
Liberty loan workers f-:- last
Sunday l;ae been cancelled. A
few workers will le allowed to
run 'heir cars, but they are ;,'r
ed to use thni only wh"n it i
ibso'utely r.eces.-'ar;" f r .K tuil
w rk on the In.-in.
1 10 FIGHTS
ray vi
UlllJj
4 .v V f
fl
f I
1 1
ü du
Mutiny in Turkish Army is Reported
With Riots in Constantinople Di
rected Against Germanic Party.
Intrin.ntiMii.il
N f w s
vi
ZURICH, Oct. 5. Mutiny
in the Turkish army.
Ten thousand deserters marched upon Constantinople de
manding the surrender of Talaat Bey and Envcr Pasha from
the ministry, said a dispatch received here today.
There were clashes between the deserters and loyal troops,
but the result of these pitched battles is unknown.
An army of deserters has grown up in Asia Minor and this
force has captured a number of towns.
Int'-rnnti n.tl Nvs S.-m Ir :
HAVRE. Oct. 5. The Belgian anm
the British on the Flanders battle trout",
n a 25-mile front, the Belcian vir mi
r . . ...I i - -i- . t T-i i .
i in.1 hüic or me rianier
1 sioil. The prisoners Captured HOH'
and Goo machine iruns and trench nu-nar
The text of the oiiicial report
"The whole of the Flanders
"We gained nine miles nn a
ah or ine i pres-uixmuae area nas reen
"The prisoners now total !.5oo. In addition
cannon and 600 trench mortars and machine
j
! x rDir, A T TDnnnc
J AMERICAN TROOPS
TAKE FOUR VILLAGES.
ft.. . a. I 1 r 1
Intt-rnatl uial News Sprvlce
wamii.nuiu.n, uct. .v I
two to tive kilometres, taking the villages of (ie-nes.
Chehery and La Fore e.-terdav, according t der,. B
official communique. The text of the document -vas as
"Headquarters American Expeditionary Force.. Oct.
c : - i -i-1. : . : . i . . "... . j
lin1 1 ills i"oinm ine .ui.u.s " .is reume.l ' C
Meusc. Overcoming a stubborn jesiqance. we have adva:
; nnes two to live kilometres taKim; mil .o. : ;o, n..rtn
mnnt mi filing fr,-m tbe ,-n.nn- ib, nlhor- ,,t" r..
Chehery and I. a Force.
j "In the face of Heavy artillery and machine i;-;n :i:
j from Illinois. Wisconsin. Western Pennsylvania. Vir
; Virginia, and regular troops beloncr'm t Mai.
! corps, forced the enemv back :o the Wriemhelde i
of the Hois de Norei.
BRITISH FORCES MAKE
SUBSTANTIAL PROGRESS.
International cs Sri e.
LONDON (lo;:5 a. m. ) Oct. ;. S;;b?
made by the Britih southeast of Heaurevi -ir
Quentin front, the war onice announced Inda;
(Beaurevoir is slightly les than three mile
Brehain, the outskirts of which were reached 1
day.)
Ficht hundred additional prisoners .
on this front.
Further advances were made by the
in the sector of I.e Catelet.
New attacks were made by the Briti
region of Le Catelet.
The text of the war of:;ce report ay
''We made progress southeast M B;
and in the sector or I.e Catelet.
hint hundred metre prisoners
uurm tne mi;m w
fielet."
M i . . t 1
m a .
(
FRENCH CROSS AISNE
CANAL NORTH OF RHEIMS.
Intf-rr.nti a;d i ri'-:
PARIS (noon). Oct. ;. Clinu::
Rheims, the French have crosed :he A
and have readied the region f Bernii
n oil need todav.
( Bermic' urt is about
vvdccesful attack n '
sector north of Rheims
six nine- r
re deliver;
IIY NEWTON C. I'AKKL.
rviti Tin! Nw S-rvj. :
In
with nn: a.mi:kica ah.mv
NoKTiiwrsT or vi:mr.
Oil. .1. (S a. in.) Th' Ainri
vnu who hoan a neu attack
twtrn the Arpoiin forn-t and tin
NIcuo ri-r ftfrilav. cn till
roin aI-ad tMla. Tlx r;i-ra-tion-
wer' d ( -rri - a "(rmtinu.
in favorably.'
line fihtinz u rather pre;iil
fnl this- n?orninjr. Tlte- air wa"
rrip and Ihr ain a hlnin.
All Gcnnan rnunter att.i U.
hae rr'n rcpu-cd.
Internet!-'Ti.l Nvrii sr'rv!
WITH THi: A.Mi:itICAN A UNI Y
on Tin: HAMiwiNi: front.
Oct. 1. (NiIit) Aineri(-an tn-"!"
tluit attnckeil silli in. fiouraml's
riciich arm? hi CluniiMznc jrtr
da luif rxi hcl St. Ftinnc. thre'
inil- north. Tjorthct f .MiNlcali
farm. The asault was renewed
PRICE TWO CENT.
tp n n
rz3
ü
n n i t ie
a ti
Un Ink
is reported to hive broken out
:.i u atiaci'K
vii
ll
i.in ;ur. a need nine
i i
mile
ce announced tod.n .
:o-v in the allies" poe.-
rkie i
-j
total 10.5f(t,
liile Imi cannon
been taken.
n.r
read:
rid.Qe has Iven .
front of : mile
a;mr
1 k. I I v. .
1 ;"
ne American troops .uva
:e.i irm
Fleville.
.r!
f
dlo
I'M
of tb.
t F.xer
Flevüle. '. lr
nd
in:a
:n.
-iti.
Hullard";
n-'Mh
an
ial
the
C ! e -
am!'
t;i,
te; -
t.i
it::;
were
carf
this nioi idnu.
llr iliivin 1 1' r 1 1 1 v .i i 1 1 a-liid-
lhf itniiM'-I' tli!i Iiih.i. th
rnriaM" 'in t l!n- f i-r 1 1 : u -1 .
Hill No. i;,; w,i t.il. n m a -1 r i i
a w ii 1 1 1 and 1 1 1 - r : 1 1 t i . i i - d r
thiou;l) Jla 'rtitio rnl- ii'Mih
f NIont l'.I.ii .
rlif pi ri'Mis- n I I ! Hrmmit
liat"aM. Iiixin i4 . ih inlj
t -i -; t i ti ir a . 1 1 m t in i!t- rma:i
fnnt.
BULGARIA LEARNED OF
TURKISH NEGOTIATIONS
i: en:
ed thr" :
a y
i . Vi
; t l
7
0
1 j J

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