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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, November 12, 1918, EVENING EDITION, Image 2

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."NOV KM I IKK 1-'. IUI.
THE SOUTH BEND NEWS-TIMES
MAKING IS
i EPOCH IN LIFE
OF SOOTH BEi
Celebration of Victory is Helc
by Happy Citizens During
Day and Night Monday
in .South Bend.
kr-pi.u- the horns of the machines
coir.- rvntlninll Th sarc? hiKh
s; irl:.s that markffl th crowd p irly
M"r hiy nomine wh n the rtw o
?!(' a mittle, icrrilnsr f.r-t T-
(!'"!, r.intin;:-d throughout the day
'in-! nlht. -
The ! 1 I eveniti: were r
rr.;t j k ! y f r from acciü nts and
-r-.hr.-. Truthc otMcers wi re
p!ar - .it en eh r i f thr lo-vn to.vn
rnrri-i--' ir!y in the mornlnr fin'l
Te V j .t nn duty until a lite hour
Mond iv ni.;hr. The jmtomoMle traf
:'. ::-; the heaviest "'ver experi
ence,! in the rlt
Th'i'i-iniN of pejyi.r. remiined
dour; town throughout the dav and
everyhody blew
ThuuMm! of
joined with the
church hells !n
a horn or whlstl.
automobile horns j
factory- thistles nnd
creatine the bleuest
noiv. vor
LUST SOLDIERS
TO LEAVE FIRST
AT HUM
E
AGAIN
. Marking1 an er o h in the hi-torv
rf South Fiend, thii city's Joyous 1
t . ft
re.errnuon of the declaration of
xvorM peace continued f ir Into Mon
day i:lht, anil even rr. tny persons
v?re s-till on the htreetx after mhl-
rieht.
IiUhlncs.s hrr.us in the down town
district, althoueh f lo-l throjiihout
the day, remained ill-irn inited from
early Morday evening until r trt
midnight. The houlevnrl liicht.s in
the business ertion of the city, fol
lowing th order of the sute f:: 1
f-.dmlniMtrator abolishing "lu-htW-H-"
Lights, reintjned liehtct until 12
'clok.
During the early part of th- eve
v.inp th hupe crowd-: ."ureM to
!.t-per park where i b:e donüro il
luminated the sky for mile arrem .
A para le was formal in iront of th-.
V.'imber of Commerce at 7:",'!
( ltd:, and headed hy tv.o hands.
the rrocslon n. arched to the park.
After Krendinc two hours there, the
r:ow('.s surged hack to the, down
town Ji.-trlct v.'hr- tliey jtiain 'n
lul?e,i , in nurnro:;:-; no:-.--making
iKaiM-rrs TIM II'Ho! luAihy.
THincinj; at the liv.-r continue.!
nUht. patronizing the restaurant in-
tc,id r.f t-cine home for their mal
o V;-y wrc they celebrating th" j
;ii pni or peac.
id )ifr!.'iti thronL'od the downtown i
i!:wlr:rt tl,,'i,iHiinnt V. .Ii,. i-lul
... . . . i . i, . . , IJ l ll' ' i J .
IIol!da Is JrIanl.
The day was declared a holiday.
I'actories declined to oi-n at all.
Merchar ts (kchhd to keep thir
and mft irol ontred
hrard in out'i Bend.
I,ati r in the morninc: moro
parades were held. County officials
carrying the hn?e service tlaif that
hankrs ir the court hou.e represent
ing the 3,500 St. Joseph county
boys ho axe in the service, led one
ie parade in which'were represent
ed thousands of factory workers,
li en and women.
Ihcoratr C ity. The contingent of United
An'verin. the mayor's call, bus- States roldiers to return to South
in. men and resblents decorate 1 Iend. arrived Monday niifht at 1 0 : 10
their places of business and homes ; o'clock via Lake Erie & Western
wth Üik's and bunting. The city and contained the 39 men from lo
put on a hfdhiay appearance In anjc'il draft boards Noti. 1. 2 and 3.
who left at .:15 a. m. Monday for
m redihly J-hort time. Thing's re-
I s inbled an old fashioned Fourth or
celebrati(j:i only several times
! larger and ni're enthti."iabti- than
j any Fou".h of July celebration ?een
in thLs cay.
b
USinet
Nobody wanted to tro home. .onu
'oiouKXJout me eeninir. ine lor.r.y there.! .it tie f)1ier hot..
places
"a rson
should
ir.fl called ipin the people to join in
a huL-o p-irade at l:n o'clock Mon-!.-.
fiftrrnoon. TiiOMari.'s answered
The m;ior call rind gathered in
frorit of the ooiirt house ;,t the ap
pointed hour. Tiie parade, which
v. as the larv st held in outh Ib tid.
march'-d Ihrouirh the prinirpal
streets of the c;t-. It is etimatel
that there were at hast r.0.f.f0
men. vomen and children in the
line of march.
ciintcioiDif t olltri VI lice lor i
making a noi was hrou-'ht out!
and used. Wildly navinp; thou-:
s. nds s tru; the
I'anner" and other
Imrin the early
riorniru encli of the many procession--
would stop at ca h corn i- ami
the bind would play the national
air. and the crowds would ins:.
Pane- at Hotel.
of the hotel bein;
and ppeotators.
Autcmobiliv-ts crowrjed
ihr.iuKhout the niht.
lle.l with dnw-ers-
tlo
the
sticets
drivers
n-f"!. Mavnr
il'-clirol that the ( h all ! Adho.ivc (turn ami Other l'rff"l
..- hu!tis for the dav ' Snlf ninfH Lado from t'ornro'
("oineobs a ijreat waste product
in the world's Kreatest corn-pro-duiir.ir
nation have leen made to
yi.-ld adhesive jruni and other use
wul sur-?ances In quantities suf
ficient to convince chemists of the
I'nited States department of agri
culture that the nucleus of a profit
able and important industry lies
in t h it; direction.
In addition to adhesive Riim, ex
periments have produced cellulose
and glucose, both of which have
many commercial use. The glu-
:tar Spangled j cote so produced crystallize well,
patriotic airs. 'and it is believed can be used in
hours of the 'the wme way an crystalline Klu-
cose from starch. Manufacture of
alcohol by the fermentation of
corncob glucose appears practic
able if sulphuric acid is obtain ble
ohea ply.
To utilize corncobs commercially,
the chemists believe, t larfce and
costly plant would be necessary,
and the bureau of chemistry does
not advise any enterprise of the
sort In war time.
it
noon and dmcd In the hotel loo
by. A hurriedly Mimmoried orches
tra furnished the mush'.
IIerbody carried a 1 1 ri -. and
Va.
The men entrained before the
word to suspend lnductrr.ents was
received here. When the word from
Director Cleneral McAdoo to stop
accepting troops for transport to
camp was received, W. L. I'.ader,
agent of the New York Central
lines, immediately telegraphed and
the troop train was intercepted at
I'eru, Ind., shortly before noon and
the men were turned about face for
home.
Mothers, sisters, sweethearts, fa
thers, brothers, relatives and
friends, augmented by the Hed
Men's band, were pres-ent to greet
the returning soldiers.
To the strains of national air,
with heads uncovered respectfully,
the crowd greeted tht arrival of the
train with cheer after cheer and
the soldiers stepped from the coach
Into the arms of their loved ones
Many eyes were wet with tears of
fcladness at the return of the sol
diers. The last man to leave this coun
ty for war and the first to return,
was Johnnie Stratik'o, brother of
the proprietor of the Washington
restaurant, who left with the con
tlnpent Monday morning as an al
ternate, petting his notice to leave
at the last moment before entrap
ment. He was the first man off the
train when the boys returned.
infr up of the wounded, and the
broken-hearted.
" 'Is there no balm in Ciiead?' cry
the Jeremiah? of today. An ! Chris
tians muFt be prepared to send back
a joyful 'Yes, there is balm in
Gllead. and Gilad is not ; far off.
but within our very reach, here and
not. !' It Is to be found in the under
standing of the healing; redeminp
and regenerating Christianity tausrht
by Christ Jesus, and practically set
forth for this ape In that r:rarkaMo
text book. 'Science and Health, with
Key to the Scriptures. I y Mary
1 taker Eddy.
ITow Value of Ilclicion.
"Now is the time for Christian
people to prove that their errat Mas
ter's relicion practically saves man
kind not only from sin. but s.cknoss;
and that it offers a complete salva
tion, here and now, from all the ills
of the flesh, and can solve the
myriad problems of our .stricken
brethren overseas."
Vncftoirys
i "Ii rtTSf m a Lim i"J!'i' tnrtk
That one word that means so much to all mankind may now be
spoken with a full confidence in the future peace and liberty of
the world.
(TTTi rrr
ranees
117 South Michigan St.
wishes to convey in some substantial manner the full appreciation
of this most important event therefore offers
Its entire stock of
74
For One
'W-rAfSass vJft i it. !
r "fin ire nTir l p-v:
11 LööCö (DLL iMtmA .M -
fill ,V:Fi; h'Xi?ntrst
4 Jill . ? S ZrV J'J rVjiffi I
Beginning Vednesday
This is our means of assisting
l i .i l
you in celebrating the gl
VICTORY of the UNITED
STATES and her allies.
This is a peace sacrifice which
we are happy to make; let joy
be unrestrained. Come in and
choose any Suit or Dress in the
house at One-fourth Off.
Please bear in mind these
garments are from our regular
stock and of the "Frances Shop
Standard.
ROVE THE VALUE
MAY LIGHTEN TAX
ENOfJlßS
Prospective Reduction in Big
Expenditures Presents
Financial Problem.
GF YOUR RELIGION
Christian Science Le'cturer
Speaks Here of Healing
Power of Faith.
A lecture on Christian Science was
delivered laat nipht in the edifice of
First Church of Chri.st. Scientist, of
this city, by John Kandall Dunn, a
member of the board of lectureship
of the mother church, the First
Church of Christ. Scientist, in Bos
ton, Mass.
Mr. Dunn, who was introduced by
Harvey Dock, lim reader of the
local church.
Quote Wont of Hymn.
The speaker said in part:
These verses of a well loved
hymn in the Christian Science
hymnal, seem especially applicable
to this tremendous moment in his
tory: " 'A plorious day is lav. ninp
And o'er the waging: earth.
The herald of the morning
Are springing into birth.
In dark and hidden places.
There shines the blessed lipht
The beam of truth displaces
The darkness of the niRht.
The advocates of error
Forsep the Kloriou. morn.
And hear In shrinklnp terror
The watchword of reform.
It rin??s from hill and valley.
It breaks oppression's chain:
A thousand freemen rally
WASHINGTON", Nov. U Peace
today threw into conference be
tween congressional leaders and
treasury officials the question of
whether the tax burden plar.ned In
the pending revenue hill can be
lightened, in view of prospective
reduction of expenditures.
Sen. Simmons, chairman of the
senate finance committee; Chair
man Kitchln of the house ways and
means committee, and Secretary
McAdoo discussed the problem but
reached no conclusion.
Mr. McAdoo said he would un
dertake an immediate survey of the
government's tentative plans for re
turn of the army from abroad, for
curtailing- war orders and other
phases of war to peace conversion,
and make recommendations within
a few days".
The uncertainty of future gov
ernment financial needs, and the ur
gent need of pushing the revenue
legislation to completion at an early
date, constitute the principal rea
sons prompting many congressional
leaders, both democrats and repub
licans, today to advocate that the
bill not be changed to reduce the
revenue to any great extent. Al
ready the senate has revised it t-o
that the income is estimated at
about SG, 200,000 instead of the
eight billions provided by the house
draft Treasury officials also point
ed out that a large inflow of taxes
will reduce the volume of war bonds
which must be floated in the spring.
Demand for immediate steps to
cut down expenditures now is com
ing strongly from both parties hi
congress. Senators Borah and
Smoot, republicans. In addre$ses In
the seate today, urged immediate
curtailment of vast government ex
peditures and said Democratic dead
er Martin would have difficulty in
carrying out his recently announced
economy program unless the public
is informed on details- of all ex
penditures. "Fen. Martin will rind there will
be one thousand reasons advanced
for maintaining and extending ex-
listing bureaus, said en. joran.
"One thing congress never has been
able to do is to abolish an otMce or
a department.
"Sen. Smoot ?aid the time has
come for the senate to point out
how the saving can be brought
about. He urged immediate cur
tailment of "Washington war bur
eaus, some of which ho said hive as
i
I many as tMi thousand employes. "
ENTER DARDANELLES
PARIS. Nov.
French torpedo
12. (Havas.)
boat Man gin i
The
a nd
the Hritish torpedo boat Shark en
tered the Dardanelles on Saturday.
Franco-British naval forces occupied
Alexandrettn. an Asiatic T-irki?h
seaport
Sunday.
in the Mediterranean on j
And swell the mlshty strain. j
"It seems very fitting that Chris- ' ALLf ED TORPEDO BOATS
Ion people should gamer, as we are j
gathered tonight, to spend a few mo-
ments conservatlng and dedicating
ourselves to the great healing work
which lies before us. Christian
Scientists have been loyal to their
government during the dark days of
this great conflict, 'and they must
now continue loyally to help our
great nation in the tremendous prob
lems of readjustment which lie
ahead.
AniingNlloii Not KimIcmI.
"For the battle qf Armageddon is
not yet ended. Armageddon is the
age-old conflict between the flesh
and spirit, the warfare with hate.
greed, sensuality, sickness and all
evil. And while the smoke of hit tie
is now lifting in devastated Europe,
from millions of lips will go forth
prayers for healing, for the comfort
ins: of the sorrowing and the bind-
TOLDS
vi-
TS
Head or Chest
are hst treated
"externally"
Vonir Tiodvdiiard.
NEW PRICES 30c 60c $1.20
Sale Starts
8:30 a. m.
Wednesday
(the Jjrc
xncts
117 South Michigan St.
Correct Apparel for Womc.
Sale Starts
S:30 a. m.
Wednesday
Break
n
a Cold
Few Hours
First dose of 'Tape's Cold Compound" relieves the cold
and grippe misery Don't stay stuffed up!
Kelief comes instantly.
A dose token every to hours un
til three dose are taken will end
crippe misery and break up a, .severe
co'.d either in the head, chet. body
or limbs.
It promptly opens ck4ged-up no.-.-tr:ls
and air pas-sages in the head.
stop; nasty discharge or noe run
l ning. relieves sick headache, dull-
lit ss. feerihnes. sort throat, sneer
ing, sonnets and stiffness.
Don't stay -tuffed-up! Quit blov ing
ar.-I miffir.cr; Has- your throb
bing head! Nothing el.-e in the wori .'
fcies .such prompt relief a "Pape"
Odd ComiHiunil," which costs only a
fo.v cents at any drug store. It acts 1
without assistance. tastes nice
causes no inconvenience, i,,? jp.
ou fctrt th genuine. Ad t.
Cooertson oros. Lo
Store Opens at 8:30; Closes 5:30 Sat. to 9:30 p. m.
Silks A S
ibl
Git
Suggestion
AS FRENCH AS PARIS ITSELF
rrnt and oit;rcticn - J
i.ir women wr. i ap-
)
of crrtet irr.plicitv. " k ,7 '
A dcasifd;y or:g-.ni ; T'TT"!
inovlfl iron
,
f
TUC WIMTri?
FASHION BOOK s;
DECEMBER
Pictorial Review yy
PATTERNS r
On SU Now
2i ccU
ensiDie
To tho i-e who will follow the Government's request con
fining their gift-giving to the strictly useful, rev gifts will
appeal so strongly .is silks.
A Dress Pattern
A Waist Pattern
A Skirt Pattern
from the following can be chosen wisely knowing the pleas
ure it will give the receiver.
Novelty Silks at $1.95 a Yard, in wondrous plaids and
stripes.
Wash Satins at $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 Yard, are famous for
their superior quality.
Tub Silks at $1.75 Yard, always popular for waists, also
for men's shirts.
Crepe c!e Chenes at $1.50. $2.00. also suggests practical
gifts made into handkerchiefs, underwear, petticoats, caps.
The Cost of Making Useful Gifts is very slight considering with what great ap
preciation they are received.
A Kimono Laundy Bag made of plain or flowered Serpentine Crepe csts only
39c yard, could also be made of Superba Flannelette for cold mornings. The price
is the same.
Mercerized Poplins are very pretty, fashioned into dresses for little children.
You can make pretty Underwear of Silk and Cotton Crepe de Chine or Fashion
Silk. The cost is only 75c yard.
Dotted Swiss, Dimities, Organdies, India Linons are only trifles in prices, but
priceless when made into dainty aprons, with pretty lace edge at only 5c yard.
White Madras will make hubby a tine shirt. The mercerized stripes will give a
pleasing appearance. The cost is only 50c yard.
Many other suggestions are also in great evidence in the fabric section. How
ever, we advise early selections. It is time now to commence making things in
tended for Christmas.
-s i&si i? 52?5igf n T. TT? TV? i wc r r i vv ',:;
yi ,1.1 V".
5
r
4.
Why Compare Beef and Coal Profits?
Swift & Company has frequently stated that its profit on beef
averages only one-fourth of a cent a pound, and hence has practically
no effect cn the price.
Comparison has, been made by the Federal Trade Commission of
this profit with the profit on coal, and it has pointed out that anthracite
coal operators are content with a profit of 25 cents a ton, whereas the
beef profit of one-fourth of a cent a pound means a profit of $5.00 a ton.
The comparison does not point out that anthracite coal at the
seaboard is worth at wholesale about $7.00 a ton, whereas a ton of
beef of fair quality is worth about $400.00 wholesale.
To carry the comparison further, the 25 cent profit on coal is 32
per cent of the $7.00 value.
The $5.00 profit on beef is only 1 per cent of the $400.00 value.
The profit has little effect on price in either case, but has less effect
on the price of beef than on the price of coal.
Coal may be stored in the open air indefinitely; beef must be kept
in expensive coolers because it is highly perishable and must be
refrigerated.
Coal is handled by the carload or ton; beef is delivered to retailers by the
pound or hundred weight.
Methods of handling are vastly different. Coal is handled in open cars; beef
must be shipped in refrigerator cars at an even temperature.
Fairness to the public, fairness to Swift 6: Company, fairness to the packing
industry, demands that these indisputable facts be considered. It is impossible to
disprove Swift & Company's statement, that its profits on beef are so small as to
have practically no effect on prices.
Swift & Company, U. S. A.

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