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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, December 05, 1918, EVENING EDITION, Image 12

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12
Tin r.so.w i:vi:xixß, iir.cr.Mnrn s, lois.
THE SOUTH BEND NEWS-TIMES
1NOW PLAYING
j
ORPHEUM WAR WEEKLY
Um CriMlor of
Old I)- Yak :mh1
tJl (illil)p-.
SIDNEY SMITH
Oh. Min"
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7:3) und
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DnlSy
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MARINO &
MALEY
FREAR, BAGGETT
& FREAR
d l.l'-.l).!! ow.lty
MURPHY &. LACHMAR
THE AITKENS
Y;rity I ;ntertainrs
DE RECAT'S MERRY
DANCERS
Ami I mit Otln-r Arts
U " '
ALWAYS A NEW
TODAY
A Great Screen Classic
THE ONE WOMAN
Based on Thomas Dixon's
novel, which was the sensa
tion of the year in which it
was published. The beauti
ful theme of wifely devotion
is nobly presented.
TOMORROW
The Dainty and Vivacious
Comedienne
BILLIE BURKE
in
"IN PURSUIT OF
POLLY"
rollicking comedy-drama
that you can't help but en
by. It will drive away the
ilucs and make you glad you
re alive. The winsome
iillie has never been seen to
letter advantage.
TODAY The KinR
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I
GÄST
WILLIAM S. HART in "THE BORDER WIRELESS
A timely and thrilling western drama with the popular war angle.
The lean-jawed hero is seen for the first time m khaki.
TOMORROW
LAWSON BUTT in "THE ONE WOMAN"
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L
ED- WOLUARflS STOCK COMPANY
Presents Dan Sully's Remarkable Play
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We guarantee you will like it better than 'The Rosary." This play has been present
ed at Notre Dame to great success, so you know it must be good.
MATIN PF I fni
TODAY
AT 2:30
i7U
Sec the dear old priest, Father Whalen, whose quaint humor
and earnest endeavor permeates every line of the play.
EXTRAORDINÄR Y!
STARTING SUNDAY MATINEE
Reginald Wright Kauffman's Startling Novel Dramatized
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uiine in
This Play Woke Up the Entire
Owing to the nature of the play, children under the age of
. companied by their parents.
G. 0. P. WOULD
DISCREDIT U. S
PAC
TERMS
Republicans Intimate Wilson
Has Not Taken Nation Into
His Confidence Oppose
League of Nations.
WASHINGTON, I?r. PreVt
UN.m's 1 1 irir.ipis arrl t-rrns, th
J.-U' '-f nations. intornatin:il 11-
t rn.irm-nt, o;. -n diplomacy an. I oth
er -ibj-cts connfctf'l with th
forthcoming praco cnnfprourp wf-rt
(li.-c;is-d In the ? nato Wlrsi ay
luring live hours of Klitp In which
many Senator. hoth rtrublicans
;in! flc-m Gerrits. joir.'-l.
I Miring tho discussion ??n. Tlorah
of Idaho, republican, introduced a
resolution propping publication of
th' paco treaty immediately upon
its completion and open discussion
of it in the senate, while Frelincr
huysen of Nv Jersey, republican,
offered a resolution seeking interpre
tation by the president of the 14
PICTURE EVERY DAY
One of the mot npcalinsr stories
of wifely devotion over written was
Thomas Dixon's popular sensational
notel. "The One Woman." In screen
form, as shown at the I,nSullo today
ami tin Ca-tle tomorrow, it should
attract xUdrsprcad attention.
Thra tor-poors who witnessed the
original production of "Tlie (lanlen
of Allali" several jcars ao, will re
menilr bauson Itutt. who played
the Monk. This splendid actor is
ro-Marred with Clara Williams in
"The One Wonlan,, the story of a
preaelier turned socialist.
Iteniriiiher pretty Itillie Harke in
'Let's (Jet a Iiorte?" She is acaln
the I .a Salle's featured player tomor
row .in a !ra ml new comedy, "In
Pursuit of Polly."
Two Ix-nelit performances will Ik
cien of the hip military photoplay,
The Hun Within," for llie Home
f.uards at the IaSaIle Thursday,
Hoc. 12, and at the Castle lYiday,
Dee. IS. MrmlHTH of the company
are selling ticket-.
nn rp
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of Wetem Actor$
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points.
Doth resolutions will be pent to
the forcitrn relations conimitte.
wh'ch, tefore the senate dhcusslo.i
opened, considered for almot twi
hours behind closed doors the reso
lution of Sen. Cummin, of Iowa, re
publican, proposing appointment of
a senate coromlttee to attend th.
Paris conference to keep the sen
ate informed of events there. Action
on the Cummins resolution was
postponed until tomorrow, with ad
ministration leaders and some re
publicans' reported opposing its ap
proval. The eommlttee also decided
to put over until next week the res
olution of Fen. Knox, of Pennsyl
vania, republican, calling for post
ponement of action by the peace con
ference on the questions of a le.nrue
of nations and freedom of the seas.
The senate' debate, which con
tinued Intermittently until adjourn
ment tonicht. was opened by Sen
I'relinphuysen. who in offering his
resolution, declared the president
hr?d never elaborated on many of
his H terms and demanded that the
Ar.-.ej-ican peopl be informed of
their concrete application.
Delay flround for Approval.
In reply. Srn. Walh of Montana,
democrat, viid delay in criticism of
the 14 principles was pround for
approval of them. Senators Poindex
ter of Washincrton, Knox of Penn
sylvania, and Johnson of California,
all republicans, challenged that
view. They insisted that after their
enunciation peace discussion cener
nlly hid been frowned upon until re
cently and consequently there had
been no general discussion of them.
Sen. Johnson said that now the
president has por.e to France, leav
ing the nation ignorant of the pre
cise meanlner of his principles.
Sen. Knox said congress had tak
en a position on an agreement be
tween nations when it attached a
rider to the naval appropriation bill
of February. 1916. authorizing the
president to call an international
conference, not later than the con
clusion of the war. for discussion of
military disarmament and peneral
arbitration of international disputes.
During the day. Sen. Kelloj? of
Minnesota, republican, delivered a
prepared address favorinpr a league
of nations whose decrees should
be enforced by popular opinion of
responsive popular government and
not by force of a super-government
or world court.
TiCxvIs Answers.
In replying to Sen. Kellogg, who
had expressed regret that the presi
dent had not taken the senate and
people more Into his confidence on
peace questions, Sen. Dewis of Illi
nois, the democratic whip declared
that In selecting the American peace
commission without naming a sen
ate representative the president had
not intentionally sliphted the senate.
He said the president had at first
favored appointing a senator, but
had reluctantly felt such a selection
would be improper since the senate
must finally pass on the treaty.
Closing the day's debate. Senators
Deed of Missouri, and Williams of
Mississippi, democrats, clashed on
the question of a league of nations.
The Missouri senator vigorously op
posed a loa true Kiverf power to use
military force In Imposing its de
crees upon a single nation and the
Mississippi senator arpued that .a
league to enforce peace as a final
resort by joint military force is desirable.
MUCH DAMAGE FROM
EARTHQUAKE IN CHILE
SANTIAGO, Chile, Dee. 5. An
earthquake has occurred in north
ern Chile. In the towns of Copiapo
and Vallenar Important damages
were caused. In other localities
damage of minor Importance result
ed. j The F. S. C. E. of Ardmore Dreth
I ren church will serve chicken supper
(and bazar Friday evening. Dec. 6, at
'the Ardmore School. Supper 35c.
lAdvt. 10110-14.
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TWICE
TODAY
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Nation!
16 net admitted unless ac
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IJ a AT n.lK
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SCHWAB BELIEVES
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:He is Heard by 4,000 at Big
Reconstruction Congress
in Atlantic City.
ATLANTIC CITV. N. J.. Dec. 5.
Four thousand men, representing
virtually every branch of business
and industry in the country, as
sembled here Wednesday in a re
messages on readjustment prob
lems delivered . by Hec'y of Com
merce William C. Redfield; Charles
M. Schwab, head of the Hethlehem
i Steel corporation, and director gen
jeral of the Emergency Fleet cor
poration, and Harry' A. Wheeler,
president of the chamber of com
merce of the United States.
Mr. Wheeier amid great applause
urged that American business should
be represented at the peace confer
ence in France. Mr. Schwab made
an appeal for a great merchant ma
rine to give outlet to surplus Amer
ican products, and declared that
labor should be permitted to organ
ize In individual plants and share in
the prosperity of the country. Sec'y
Redfield said that no rash hand
should be laid on wages; that the
proper spirit of trade is not exces
sive profits, but service, and that the
American business man should take
into account moral values when
dealing with his customers in all
land.
May Send Delegation.
There is some talk here tonight
that a committee of American busi
ness and Industrial men might be
sent to Europe during the peace ne
gotiations. Sec'y Redfield prefaced his speech
with the statement that his remarks
were not to be taken as an olflcial
announcement. "I am more and
more impressed." said Mr. ItedneM,
"in reading current discussions and
reflecting upon them with the truth
that readjustment is very largely a
state of mind that it requires not
so much a program of a fixed line of
procedure as an evolution. While
we ar discussing it the process of
readjustment is proceeding almost
silently about us."
He made a plea that a helpful
hand be extended to the countries
that suffered through the ruthless
ness of the central powers.
Mr. Schwab's appeal for a mer
chant marine struck a responslv
chord. A great merchant marine is
essential for the ultimate success of
the United States, he said, and Its
successful operation is not for the
benefit of any one man or class of
men or any one branch of business,
but for the good of every citizen of
the country.
Sehxvnn In Labor Comment.
Taking up the question of labor,
Mr. Schwab said:
"I am one of the men who believe
in the fairness of American labor. I
am one of the men who believe the
only foundation upon which any
thing can 'permanently rest is the
economic use of everything, whether
it be labor, material manufacture, or
what not. Any foundation of or
ganized labor or capital that Is on
a false basis must fail. We started
In some 20 years ago on a series of
exploitations that many people call
ed trusts, and there were many such
concerns organized that had as their
prime motive the artificial Idea of
either restricting production or in
creasing the selling price. You have
seen them, one after the other, fail
and fade away. That was on a
wrong basis. Our congress realized
it and rightly and Justly took steps
to correct It.
"What has been true of capital
will be equally true of labor, and
therefore the education of the
Arnerican laboring man must be to
have him realize that his perma
nency and success, and the success of
the nation will depend upon labor
conditions and capital conditions
that are founded on economic prin
ciples first of all."
Thirty-six related industrial
groups met tonight and considered
questions affectincr their particular
interests in the work of reconstruc
tion. The views of these groups will
be passed alont? to 10 major croups
tomorrow, who will consider resolu
tions that may eventually reach the
tloor of congres?.
Bernard M. Raruch. chairman of
the war industries board, in a letter
read to the congress said the cancel
lation of contracts does not mean a
repudiation of contracts. "The gov
ernment will not, I am sure," he
said, "take from the industry of the
country anything to which it Is en
titled to under each and every con
tract." ARGENTINA DENIES SHE
IS MOBILIZING FORCES
PUEN'OS AIRES. Dec. 5. Consid
erable discussion has been caused
here by reports or Argentinean mo
bilization in the Andean regions a
a result of the controversy between
Chile and Peru. The government de-
jnies that mobilization has been or
'clcred. Hijh army othcers say that
they have as yot received no instruc
tions, but are ready to mobilize at
a moment's notice, if such action be
1 comes necessary.
K. O. T. 31.
Members are requested to be pres
ent at the next meeting. Friday
night. Dec. ?. Election of officers.
A lunch and smoker will follow.
The c'orufnittee has prepared for a
good time.
!,OriS HERCIER, Com.
S. It. THOMAS. R. K.
Advt.
annoi'nci:mi:nt or haxct:.
Company "C" Home Guard, will
give a Military Ball at Place Hall.
Friday eve.. Dec. 6th. All members
of th? guard and their friends are
Invited. 10104-3
- i t r
THEATERS
AT Tili: OLIYKlt.
There will be an initial perform
ance this afternoon of "The Parish
Priest," a play that mUht well be
compared to "The lUt-ary" in its
sterling qualities, its idea! senti
ments and its beauty of story and
doctrine. Father Whalen Is the
leading character, a dear old priest
who loves the world and who ia
never angered save in rebuking sin.
It is his humor, and his wise coun
sel, together with his charming per
sonality -that makes "The Parish
Priest" the play that will no doubt
delight the patrons of the Oliver
this afternoon and the remainder of
the week, Miss Leone plays th-3 role
of a little Irish cirl whose every
move is full of life and every line
means a smile. Mr. Williams v.'ill be
seen as "Jim" whoee brotherly love
is a foundation upon which the
playwright built. There will be a
matinee of "The Parish Priest." on
Saturday and a final performance on
Saturday night.
AT Till: OKPHKUM.
Sidney Smith, the clever creator
cf the well-known cartoons, "Old
Doc Yak" and "The Gumps." is to
day's headliner at the Orpheum in
a cartoon-talking act that will prove
a real treat to all who see it. Thi3
act has been secured by . special
arrangement of Manager Allardt's.
and Koos direct from here to the
Majestic theater in Chicago, where
he is the featured act of the bill.
Marino and Maley are Italian char
acter comedians, and their piano
moving act. entitled "Push 'Em Up."
U a real laugh-getter. Frear, Bag--ett
and Frear present a singing,
dancing and talking number that is
out of the ordinär)'. The scene is
laid in a baseball park and much
lively action is introduced. Murphy
and Lachmar, billed as "The Laugh
Trust," and the Aikens. in a roller
skating and contortion novelty,
complete the bill. The latest allied
war review is also shown.
AT Till" AUDrrOIUUM.
One of the cleverest comedy
dramas of the screen, "His Bonded
Wife," starring Emmy Wehlen, is
the attraction at the Auditorium to
day. The adventures of Doris Morse, a
young New York society debutante
who wishes to pose as a poor girl
to be sure that the man she marries
loves her and not her money, are
many and varied, and some of the
instances are worth mentioning for
their originality.
Doris leaves home and goes to a
big summer resort where she enjoys
the simple pleasure of swimming
and boating taking in the delights
of a day in an amusement park with
shoot the shoots, steeplechasing and
other allied sports. She meets and
falls in love with a young architect
and tells him that she is a shop girl
in that city. He follows her to town
nnd arranges to meet her after clos
ing hours in front of the dpartment
store in which she works. Compli
cations of all sorts begin to arise on
account of her innocent deception,
nnd she finds it harder and harder
to stick to her resolutions particu
larly as she is beginning to long for
expensive new clothes. How she is
led through a maze of extraordinary
adventures is cleverly worked out in
th play- "Hands-Up," the sen
sational serial story' and the Official
War Review which is always filled
with interesting events, are also on
for today. William Farnum. one of
the most popular actors in pictures
will be seen tomorrow in "The
Plunderer." a ftory gripping with
romance and adventure. "Hicks of
Manhattan." the second of the
clever two reel comedies of James
Montgomery Flagg, will complete
the bill.
AT Tili: CASTI.K.
"The Porder Wireless" is the
title of today's splendid western
drama, which stars William t. Hart,
this time as a war-hero. The sight
of the lean-Jawed actor in khaki is
an unfamiliar one and his many ar
dent admirers will like him even
more than usual. The story concerns
itself with a German spy plot that is
uncovered on the Mexican border.
Wanda Hawley, a petite blonde, is
responsible for the story's romantic
interest.
"The. One Woman," dramatized
from Thomas Dixon's novel of the
same title, is tomorrow s attraction.
Lawson Rutt and Clara Williams are
i-o-starred. The theme is one of
wifely devotion and a husband's
la ithlessness.
TUG ON'K WOMAN"
A sEUiors piCTUitn
When Thomas Dixon wrote "Tho
One Woman." shown at the Lasalle
today, it created quite a sensation
for it is a bitter arraignment of so
cialism, especially when such ideals
tend to make a minister forget hi.?
church, his family an Wlow an
other wealthy woman. I-awsoh Butt
gives a masterful interpretation of
the leading role. He created the
lending part in "The Garden of Al
lah." a few years ago and is a splen
did actor. Clara Williams does equal
ly v. -:i with the role of the patient,
. forgiving wife, who takes back the
wandering husband after his foolish
notions are shattered. The picture i?
well produced, but is a serious and
rather talkative subject.
Friday: "In Pursuit tf Polly,"
with Rillie Burke.
Tili: I'.KXINtJTOX TI1 ROOM
J. 31. S- BUHL
is closing for business Dec. 5th. The
i business as a whole, including com
j p'ete equipment is offered for sale
until Monday. Deo. 16th. when, if
not disposed of. its equipment, in
cluding refrigerators, range, kitchen
jand dining room furnishings, Vic
itrola. etc., will be offered in whole
(or separately at private 5ale at 816
J. M. S. Bldg. Phones: Bell 262,
Home 5 6 S. 10125-5
PFHIGII VALLEY II RI COAL
All .size. Phone Reil 113; Home
f40. Knot lock and Martin.
Advt. 10101.10
Now
IM
S. W. Corner
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APDffORIDM TODAY
Would you deceive the man you love to make him
happy? This girl wanted to be loved for herself alone.
Did she find what she sought? See the charming
wmmr wemelw
BOND
An exceptionally pleasing
II
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,'
WILLIAM FARNUM
DIRECTION WILLIAM OV
MONDAY, TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY And had we 3,000
seats many people would be turned away, and the amusement going
public have our word, and our word is always our bond, and we say
that there never has been a three-reel comedy to equal CHARLIE
CHAPLIN in "SHOULDER ARMS." We have seen it and it's sure
ly a world beater, and we want every man, woman and child to come
and see it on our say so. Come Monday as Tuesday and Wednesday
you will never get in, so make up your matinee parties now and stay
away from the 8 o'clock show 9 o'clock just fine.
1 1 in i immmmimmmimttH i n ,
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izritjj LS rrw .v
fö)HEOPGOCDCU)TH
Patronlz; the advertiser he
Is there to serve you.
For
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Women's, Misses' and Junior's
smart new Winter Coats Vel
our, Pompom, Bolivia, Silvertone,
Zibeline, Beaver Cloth, Broad
cloth and Plush. Few Velvet,
Plush or self trimmed. $35.00
and $37.75 Coats, special
S24o75
WATCH US GROW
o t
Michigan Street and
ft
m
five-reel drama and a very
beautiful and clever star. "HANDS UP," a sensation
al serial that everybody will join us in saying it's the
best ever, featuring popular Ruth Roland.
Extra Special Every Thursday "THE ALLIES
OFFICIAL" WAR REVIEW" getting more popular
every week.
TOMORROW That great and very popular actor
that is so dearly loved by every man, woman and
child, to be seen at his best in "THE PLUNDERER,"
one of his very best 6-reel sensational western dramas
and seen at his best. We ask our patrons to try and
become acquainted with our new cracker-jack two
reel comedies by James Montgomery Flagg. See this
one, "HICK MANHATTEN." You can't help but like
them and will look for them from time to time. This
is surely a 100 percent show.
a
HARRY L.YERR1CK
Funeral SM"
Director
MOTOR EQt'ir
FIRST IN THE NEWS-TIMES
K Chapel.
2Z' Ambu!n.f.
Carriage.
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MAX ADLER
COMPANY
World's Best Clothes.
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Advertisers can -el! for le
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