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South Bend news-times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, September 22, 1920, Morning Edition, Image 20

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20
FOOD SHORTAGE
IN PORTUGAL IS
CAUSE OF RIOTS
Mob Attacks Fish Market
.Women Wait in Line
to Get Bread.
lis no:;, stpt. 21. rortuini i
y iKTiiiH from n. hortaK; c..f coal
and rrov;.:ons which h.io rciili.-d
I: looli:: "f fuud i.r.' in miu
1-arts tf lh-- country an 1 in tho re
ai'iM ar.ini.y ( f tin: lurr.K rly Jan.iii.tr
lint-a f uurr.oa s-landinK uut-j-.ie
at l.ik.TUii waiting lor i r. id.
The situation h.s ,i-ui co:.i,l;rutl
y an annnic nit fit of tin- i:ar.;d
t r of tho lnUnor j .1 i i i 1 1 -! in the
N cu!o that, the kji -untnt hu. Lj
cuiu awari' of a luNht-vi.--t jlot to
lovok ll.-tturt.inr -i ail owr i'ortu-
al, to as u 1 .'id u; ti fiM.iul
li.-ivciiU'iit l-it-r. Th: iniriist.-r m.i'io
it known that th; ri.iii-nt had
t.iken ii'.cauUr.M tj frustrate th'jay
Tht-ro have reen ?cvrrj conflicts
at hintan in. ;-tnb il anl in oth r
l irtä of th.- country vhr- hturt.s
L'-'Ti looted and emptied of
their '.-onti-nta. Th; military author
i 1 1 as.suiiK il control 111 .S.iiUan in
an onkr wi.. r.storcd hut subv
i'it ntly tish liofs o u rrl. lh S.tii-tart-m
nah market was attack"l ty
a mob which n-lzi:A th; t'u)i arid
i : 1 1 1 it anion: t h -ms-I v a. iJry
1 ml i orm rly v. as Iho chic-f and fa
orite food of tho p-plo but is now
ki t xi li.lvo that only I ho woll-to-do
(an aiford it. One ühopkr vp'T ap-j'cay.-d
the raf1" hy distrihutin Ids
supply oi .fd ll.sh and thus was al
1 .',i.d to retain )ua other wart-.4.
STi"ns Sliorta.
Thn i-riousrjpM of tin- shortns
d fod and fuel ha ? been inpha
h:7. d by a .statement of rnniier
;ranj' mi' in parliament in which
1..- said that th'-ro sas a lack not
only of coal and provisions bnt of
all f't!iT artiel s iu'lispensaMo lor
living. JSinco th-r was only 1,09)
tonü of litnrar to supply the country,
th Kov rnr.u nt was ,'";' to pro
hibit it M.ti' in restaurants and
pistry ph"''i so that the hospitals of
J'ortu-al might net run short.
"Mutter, lard. coal, oil and even
Vfctubbs have disappeared froni
the ni irk t since jrovernmnt prices
wre fixed for thoso articled," slid
v n more d sp' rate than the others,
tie pr-mi r. "The bread question is
The wheat in thi.; country will
1 arfly MtitHcf to .'-ipply bread for
the next f.ve days. Wheat con
tracts are bclntf closed by tho rov
ernment at a vary hi'h price. The
maize harvest is fo had that we have
already imported 100. OOo ton.- of it.
There is no coal in the city of Lisbon
where the poor are tearing up their
l'.oor? to cook their food and the
fore-crn coal i:s foM at such an ex
orbitant price that it doo.s not even
nl!nw OTir fishing versels to to
rea for fish."
In icwof this cri!, the premier
nj-pealcd to parliament for .'dd and
efforts are Vlnp tnade to obtain
wheat from the bif? farmers in tho
Kihatejo district.
Union Shoe
Company
223 So. Michigan St.
rz
1
SKI
L
i!
ft
Oil
To Every Purchaser of a Jaxon tire at the Regular price we will sell another tire of the same size for only one dollar. You get two tires
for the price of one by paying an additional dollar. For example: A 30x3 Jaxon tire costs $23.50. By paying $1.00 more, or $24.50
in all, you get two 30x3'2 Jaxon tires.
BUY A 3,000 RAIL
f
n
These tires are absolute firsts,
each bearing serial number and
contained in original wrapper.
Jaxon tires are made of best qual
ity Sea Island cotton fabric and
pure para gum rubber in generous
quantities a combination that in
sures extra miles. Jaxon tires
have an extra heavy tread and
thick side walls with a resiliency
that insures a greater riding com
fort. ORDER BY MAIL
No deposit necessary. Merchan
dise shipped c o. d. subject to examination.
South Bend's Largest Tire Distributors
CONSOLIDATED TIRE
J. E. DAVIS, Manager
Home Office Grand Rapids.
Play
Work
Home
HAVE INVENTED KILN
FOR WOOD SEASONING
(A True Story of .Science.)
"What is tlo- matter with these
drawers, anyway? Kvcry time 1
want a necktie. I nearly freak rn
I a' k trying to iut! tV.Js one open."
No one knows how much tnery
has f.fen lost, or liow many sweet
dispositions- soured, by bureau draw
ers that stick.
This f.-. t does not seem to bo
c!o.-c!y connected with the airplane
industry, but it is. As a rule draw
ers that slick, like hows that will
not shoot, have been made from
unseasoned timber.
On of the bluest problems fac
iofc the government in 1 1 1 7 was how
to -et jjood reasoned timber for air-
plains. iprucc is about the only
kind of wood that can b used
s 1 J isfactorily in airplane construc
tion. Whn the Kovornment de
cided to mak airplanes by the tens
of thousands, there was not nearly
enough s;rue cut and dried. Un
numbered mammoth trees were
growi.". on the fojry mountains of
Va neou ver a mi Wasiilngton, but how
to turn the.c trees into the seasoned
tiioli r, necessary for airplanes, was
the iiestif)n.
Any hry who has ever made a
liow and arrow knows that the b-st
kind of woofl is that which has been
seasoned in a dry place in the open
air for a year or more.
Hut airplanes could not wait for
spruce to season that way. Lumber
men knew that it was possible to
season timber in kilns, bv.t uch
lumber was likely to shrirk or swell,
according to the climate. It would
not do.
Up in Madison, "Wis
mann had been work'
in the Forest Service
trying to lind a way to
. H .D. Tic
7 for years
laboratories,
season wood
more quickly ami satisfactorily.
Mr. Ti'-mann came forth with a
new kiln that would season lumber
thoroughly in from eight to 1-1 days.
It consists of a closed chamber in
which the lumber is piled in a cer
tain specified way. The temperature
and humidity are regulated accord
ing to delinite rules. There is no
cuesswork about it. It brings re
sults. Lumber seasoned in a T.e
mann kiln, is even more satisfactory
than lumber seasoned for a year in
th open air.
Mr. Tiemann dedicated his inven
tion to public use. Now manufac
turers of all kinds, making; everything-
from furniture to ukuleles,
will benetlt by it.
(Another Suh Story Tomorrow.)
OLD MAN PUZZLE
I'unctuato this sentence so it
makes sense. It can he done:
"It was and I aaid not but."
(Answer to yesterday's: 1. Bad
ger, Wis. '. Bay, Mass. 3. Fine
Tree. Me. 4. Huckeye, O. . Coy
ote, S. D. 6. Creole, Ii. 7. Hawk
eye, la. S. l'ralrie. 111.)
OLD LADY RIDDLE
What was Joan of Arc made of?
(Answer to yesterday's. "What
has four leg and ran jump as hih
as the Woolworth building " A dead
cat: tho Woolworth building can't
Jump.)
$1
STEP LIVELY-SALE
ig
efeV 1
WS
TIu News-Times School Department
Edited by Elisabeth Steele.
The Boys' and Girls' Daily Messenger
Sc1kk1 Yell
(Make up a yell and send it in.)
(No collection of nchool yells is
complete with a pood "locomotive."
Yells of this kind can be made very
effective by rising to a whistle, and
then fewingin? hats with a vicious
"Iioom!" to start things ofT. Ohio
State university and others, at Mg
games, carry confetti which they
throw In the air at the "Doom!")
Who. Itah? Who, Rah?
Ilcedville High, Rah!
Who. Rah? Who. Rah?
Reedville High, Rah!
Who. Rah? "Who, Rah?
Keedvlllo High. Rah!
R-A-V!
(Yell this slow at first, fast at the
end.)
tea STUDY a
2MELPS.
A Study Corner at Home
"It's too chilly to sJt on the front
porch this evening. Let's rxove in
to study."
So in they go. Then, in a minute:
"(iec whiz, Dad, how can I study
when you read that magazine out
loud?"
"Robert Wat kins, come here with
my nercil nd paper. I simply have
to have it."
' vmiv is thät old atlas we used
to have? I wish I could find it."
There are few homes that do not
have paper, pencils, pens, rulers, a
few reference books, sclssois, paste,
a waste basket, a table and a light
with a good shade. Rut the trouble
is. such things are scattered every
where In four, five, six, seven, or a
dozen rooms.
Go through the house and gather
uv all such things that you need
for your evening study. Rring them
all together into one comfortable
corner, a "Home Study Corner."
Then make a habit of studying In
that one place. After you have
done It a w hile, you get used to It.
It is easier to study there than any
where else, even though someone
may lie talking acrcss the room.
Soon a study corner helps to form
a study habit. Better lessons,
learned more quickly, is the result.
CIRLH00D STORIES
OF FAMOUS WOMEN
It(sa IWmhcur
"Now Betsy hold still just a min
ute longer until I paint your tail,"
said little Rosa to a big cow which
was grazing; near by. "1 must hurry
home for mother wanted me to take
care of Juliette this afternoon, but
I just couldn't help romlng out to
paint a little while," chatted Rosa to
the cow.
When .she got homo her father
examined the picture carefully and
decided it vvas time that she go to
the studio with him and be taught
the principles of painting.
Rosa Ronheur devoted her whole
life to painting". She became fa
mous through her animal pictures,
one of which la the well known
"Horse Fair."
$1
$1
ill u S
ENDS SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER
Factory
Size List Prico One Dollar More
30x3 z z z z $19.70 Two for - - - $20.70
30x3H - - - - $23.50 Two for $24.50
32x3H - - - - $28.00 Two for - - - $29.00
32x4 - - - - $37.40 Two for - - - $38.40
33x4 - - - - $39.25 Two for - - - $40.25
34x4 - - - - $40.10 Two for - - - $41.10
210 EAST JEFFERSON BLVD.
Branches Flint, Jackson, Battle Creek, South Bend, Saginaw.
School
Study
Sports
FROM AN OFFICE BOY
' TO REAL ESTATE GAME
(True Story of a Real Boy.)
"Selling can-openers or taking
soap orders may be all right, but
net for me," says Arnold Klory of
Fort Worth. Tex.
I Early in the summer, Arnold, who
Is 14 years old, secured a position
helping in a local real estate olKce.
Une day, when there happened to
be more customers than the regular
alesmen could take carrrcf. the
manager let Arnold take a man out
and shcw him a house.
Arnold did it so well that ho sold
the house. Naturally, they gave
him tho same chance again. Dur
ing tho summer, he sold four pieces
of real estate, making a commis
sion of 1560.
GIRtä DEBATING CLUB
ACCEPTS NEW MEMBERS
Tlie annual mystic rites of Initia
tion again took place in tho Girls'
Debating club of the high school
Monday evening at the home of Lu
cile Tasher. The How, What and
Who have been rigorously sup
pressed Preceding the ceremony, a
pot-luck supper was served on tho
lawn at the home of the president,
2910 S. Michigan St.
Class of 9 19 Presents
Emergency Room to High
An emergency room has been
added to the equipment of the high
school as a class memorial of the
class of 1919. The room, which was
opened Monday, contains all the
necessary utilities for a room of this
kind. Tho equipment consist sof a
hand and arm treatment chair, a
hospital bed with a felt mattress
and two small chairs, all in white
enamel, and a cabinet and stand
combination In white enamel and
glass. The room adjoins the clinic
on the third floor.
Tired of Sitting
A young lady entered a crowded
car with a pavr of skates slung over
her arm. An elderly gentleman
arose to give her his seat.
"Thank you very much, sir," she
said, "but I've been skating all after- !
noon and I'm tired of citting down.'
U. 5. HUMANE WORKERS
WILL MEET IN OMAHA
OMAHA, Neb., S pt. 21. Hu-
mano workers of the nation will
gather hero next month for the 44th
annual convention of the American
Humane society.
Among those announced as com
ing to tho convention are Sen. Peter
G. Gerry of Ithodo Island, whoso
father practically founded child
protection work in the United
States, which in turn has been a
model for the rest of the world;
.Mrs. Anita Baldwin, of California,
daughter of "Lucky" Baldwin; and
Ernest K. Coulter, general manager
of the New York Society for Pre
vention of Cruelty to Children, the
first of its kind and the largest
child protection society in the world.
Mr. Coulter was also founder of the
Biff Brother movement, according to
the announcement.
$1
$1
A
h u
TIRE FOR ONE
Fn (7S Ffl
Guaranteed 5,000 Miles
STORES
FEZ DISAPPEARING
WITH TURK'S RULE
Headgear of Moslems; Slowly
Giving Way to Hats
With Brims.
CONSTANTINOPLE. Sept. 21.
With the crumbling of Turkish
authority and Influence, the fez, the
badge which all Turkish subjects.
Christians, Jews and Turks alike,
are supposed to wear, is rapidly
disappearing. Although the Mos
lems Mill wear their fezzes In the
streets, they no longer cling to them
slavishly indoors. Soon the Turks
may be wearing hats with brims in
Constantinople. Moslems in other
parts of Turkey insist the Moham
medans in the capital lost their re
ligion long ago through their desire
to imitate the infalels.
As all heads must remain covered
in the mosques and it is quite Im
possible to touch one's forehead to
a prayer rug while wearing a hat
with brim .the fez is indispensable
to the faithful Moslem who prays
daily to Mecca. Even military and
naval officers must wear visorless
caps.
Fez Prevails.
The fez still prevails in Anatolian
cities. In fact It Is unsafe for for
eigners to wear a hat in many of
them unless he desire to attract a
crowd of hooting small boys and run
the risk of starting a riot. Osman
Apha, tho terrorist governor of
Kerassunde. recently checked the
tendency of nor.-Mcslems in that city
to get away from old customs.
An Armenian who had Just re
turned from Russia walked along
the main street of the little city
wearing a stiff-brimmed straw hat.
It was worse than wearing a straw
hat on the New York stock exchange
after the season had passed. Osman
Agha grabbed the hat from the Ar
menian's head, slashed the crown
from tho rim with his sabre, jam
med the crown down on the Ar
menian's head.
"FREEZONE"
Lift Off Corns! No Pain!
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a little
Freefone on an aching corn, in
stantly that corn stopü hurting, then
shortly you lift it right off with
fingers. Truly!
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle
of Freezone for a fen cents, suffi
cient to remove every hard corn,
soft corn, or corn between the toes,
and the calluse?, without soreness
or irritation.
fl
P t
n
4
hi
25
DOLLA
in rt r
Bargains Everywhere for this Big Sale Day
INTERURBAN DAY INTERURBAN DAY
CHARMEUSE SATIN
40-inch Charmeuse Satin,
in black, navy, taupe, Copen
hagen, pink and blue; reg-uIar$5.00qual-
Pfl
ity. bale price. pJmfhß
WASH SATIN
36-inch Wash Satin, in
flesh, old rose, pink or white;
regular $2.25 quality.
pmce . $1.69
CREPE DE CHINE
40-inch Crepe de Chine,
in black, brown, navy, Co
penhagen, ivory, pink or
tan; regular $2.25 quality.
price . SI -39
SHIRTINGS
Crepe de Chine and
Broadcloth all silk Shirtings,
in all colors; $3.50 quality.
price S2.4S
BLACK PEAU DE SOIE
36-inch Black Peau de
Soie Silk, splendid $3.50
quality. Sale
.19
J
price
BLACK TAFFETA
36-inch Black Taffeta
Silk, splendid quality; $2.25
kind. Sale rf J bt
3 i .öö
pnee
400 CHILDREN'S
DRESSES
Children's Gingham
Dresses, plaids, checks,
stripes, and plain colors;
ages 2 to 6; in many styles;
sÄ$at00:..$L69
S. W. Corner
r7r
1
AMERICAN TRUST o
" at Brandon's
c
SALE OF WAISTS
We offer a large shipment
of beautiful new silk blouses
in georgette, tricolctte and
crepe de chine. (
Special at . . . .
50
SALE OF WAISTS
Large selection of white
voiles and organdie wash
waists that sold at 53. DU.
Special
at .
$2.25
GINGHAM DRESSES
Children's Gingham
Dresses in pretty plaids,
checks, stripes and solid col
ors; ages 6 to 14; up to
$5.00 d resses. tf b f
Special at
...
ENVELOPE CHEMISE
Fine quality soft finish,
flesh or white, lace or em
broidery trim. OQ
extra special at 4 8 bWw
WOMEN'S NIGHTGOWNS
Fine quality, lace or em
broidery trime. ß4 flQ
Extra speci al.. iß I .09
Sale of SAMPLE GLOVES
Women's gloves, kid,
cape and suede gloves,
black, white and colors, in
all sizes. Some are slightly
mussed and some arc mend-
i
ed gloves in values up to
$3.00 per pair,
$1.25
go in this sale at
Sale of SAMPLE GLOVES
Women's Silk Gloves,
black, white and colors,
double finger tips, values up
to $1.25 per pair, JJJj
special at
C
WATCH US GROW
Michigan Street and Jefferson Blvd.
Important Notice
to Liberty Bond Holders
Holders of temporary coupon bonds of the
First, Second and Third Liberty Bonds, from
which all interest coupons have been detd,
should now exchange them for permanent
bonds in coupon or registered form.
Exchanges c?n be made through this bank,
as a Federal Reserve Bank.
Temporary coupon bonds of the Fourth
issue are not exchangeable for permanent
bonds after October 1 5 th, at which time pub
lic announcement will be made.
This bank will gladly assist and advise you
in regard to making these exchanges.
.V -Jrt& A
!Q lh-1- rQI
nroiTn-noTrprhTTr'.z "
ti U W I I J I !
SALE OF SAMPLE
GLOVES
Women's Silk Gloves,
Mil ancse, black, white and
colors, double finger tin?.
values up to 2.00 "T?
a pair, special ....
300 HOUSE DRESSES
Women's large House
Dress Aprons in light on
dark colors in several styles,
all new. A won- ( J A f
derful bargain at I nSJ
SALE OF HOSIERY
Women's Silk Hosiery,
black, brown, white or navy,
splendid quality; that for
merly sold up to $2.00 a
pair, spe- (J Ji 4P
cial liiW
SALE OF HOSIERY
Women's Burson Hose, in
black, or black with white
feet; regular or out sizes;
65c kind, spe- l
cial
SERGE DRESSES
A Tremendous Sale
Smart new Seige Dresse
from two of New York's
large high-gTade makers.
Many styles, and away un
d e r the regular price.
TT. $29.7ö
SALE OF NEW SUITS
Women's and Misses' Suits
The most marvelous suits
at th is price that can be pro
duced. Suits of Serge, Ve
lour and Tricotine. Mostly
fur trim, other braid trim,
r. .11 n 1 rn ti
inn iiare ana ruine mode
Special
at
S39.75
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$1
$1
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