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Marshall County Democrat. (Plymouth, Ind.) 1855-1859, January 03, 1856, Image 1

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THE BLESSINGS OF GOVERNMENT, LIKE THE DEWS OF HEAVEN, SrbULD FALL ALIKE UPON THE RICH AND THE POOR-JACKSCN.
Y 1 1 MV H :
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VOL. 1,
15 USIXI :SS I I3 SKCTOItY.
H;i?iiu-5- Cnnl not cxcwtlini; three lines Wiser
ted under this head, at 1 jcr annum.
Persons advertising in the "Democrat" ly the
ear, r:l! lie entitled to a Card in the Business Di
rei tury, without additional charge.
Hkivslwtf L ountn Xicmocnit
JOB PRINTING OFFICE.
We have on hand an extensive assortment of
Ami are irepared to execute
JOB JA'D FIXfV PRKTIXC!
Of every description ami quality, such as
rlRtTI-ARf,
HANDBllXS,
LABELS,
CATAUX.IM,
rAMriu.ET3,
BCSINKSS CARDS,
ni.ANK if:kis
mortgages;
Ami in short, Blanks of every variety ami descrip
tion, on the shortest notice, & on reasonable terms
1" PLYMOUTH BANNER, BY W. J. BURNS,
Plymouth, Ind. j
B'"llOOx'&EVÄNS "DEALERS IN DRY
Goods and Groceries, conior Michigan and j
La Porte streets, Ply mouth, Iml. I
KOWSLKK & Co., DEALERS IN DRY j
i J uinhü ana groceries, nrsi ooor ca.- me ui .
IVliehiiran street,
Plvniouth, lud.
C1WLMEK, DEALER IN DRY GOODS &
m Oroeeries, south corner La Forte and Mich
ir.tn 'trects, Flymouth, lud.
"XT II. OCLKSI1KK & Co.. DEALERS IX
- i
L( Dry Goo.ls & Groceries, Brick Store Mich- ;
i";n street, riymouth, Ind !
rniYv corci.i:. de t.kr ix dry ooods
t und Grocenes.conier of .Michigan and Gano
strrcts .
rivinoutli, Ju.l. ,
TTKStV.RVELT & IIHWIT, DE ALK RS j Hk. men women and children iri the nei-h-
W in Drv JoimIs t Gmceries, Flvmonth, lud. . . . . , ,. . . .
JL : boi liiMxl, cumj)velii.'ndi:ij abou .nine-tenths
dH ?: ('!VKI'AX1)' I)!:l!U:iNl,)ZV;i.ftlieI.n1u!ati.,n--ie assembled on the
T (.ions. II ir-iwaiv, etc... . I ivmoutli, Inl. 1 1
- - I.irri level common which served as a raee-
71 rUS.Dr.MIAM. MILLINER MANTUA
I M tk. r Flvmouth, Iml.
lÄRDX i BAXTER, DEALERS IN
3 Stow, Tinv. nv, ,e., Fi m uth, lud.
TfYB. 1 4 E R S 1 1 IN GD I ' A L E 1 1 IN DRUGS
I J a"'- Medicines Flymoutli, Iml.
n. r. r cKRo a. vi.xNEiK.v.
XJACKARD VINN EDGE, WHOLESALE
j & Retail Omc. rs Flvmouth, Iml.
- . . -
a 2 rusk,
SL,. Frovis'u
DEAL ER IN ( 1 II OCE R 1 ES &
1T a 1 Y 1
-Ion, i ivmouni, inn.
iwrt-' I? t- V T.T. VCP DEM.K.RSIX
.....i i .;;... IM, t).
1 ' -n 'ii.-j. 1 1
W. DAVIS, SADDLE AND II ARNE."
Iak r, riyniontli, lud. 1
T B N 11 Y P I K It C H , DI'ALKU IN CLO-
. thin- .fc im.i,hi !.-:. Is, rivinoutli. In-1. !
5 OHN M'DANNKL. M A N I i'A C T 1' K K 1 1 & '
c 5 dealer in l!oots " Shoes riymouth, Iml. :
ß
4 YUKS I5AI.DWIN, MANrKACTritKR
r oflJtiot-& Shoes riymouth, Ind.. I
MANri'ACTrUKR OF.
ri mouth, Iml. I
j Vh
Oil N O 1 PK,
ots : Shoes, . .
T M I V I TT M NIT CTU II Kit OF
Cul ."met Ware Plymouth, Ind j
I iri'i.UYTF.R & FlI NCIS, IIorSF. (!ARPKN !
J trrS: Joiners, riymouth, Ind. i
T-UIES YAUNKIi, IU )FSI' CAUPKNTKIi & i
tf ß Joiner.. .
.rivmouth Ind
B
M'CIIEIiT & Co., MAN" TA C rUKKKS X ;
E
tttfvrr A-snv TI'l.'l'Rs. f'li A1RMA-'
. ... w;;M..h. l..d.
EMJOTT .t Co., M A N I ' FA CTI T R K RS OF
Wapns, Carriapeäi Je l'lows, Plymouth, Ind.
c
OLLINS i XICIIOI-S 3 1 A N U FA C TLT R -
ers ot'S.ish Jiv Plymouth, Ind.
B
KNJ. BP:.'IS, BLACKSMITH,
Plvniouth, Ind.
A
K. liRIGGS, BLACKSMITH,
rivinoutli, Ind,
D
A ( 1 1 7 E R R EOT Y I' KS, 11 Y J. E. ARM
STRONG, riymouth, Ind.
SALOON, BY M. ILTIBÜITS.
riynumth, Ind.
A
MERICAN HOUSE, HY G. P. CHERRY
& SON,.1 riymouth, Ind.
TriDWARDS' HOTEL, UYW.C. EDWARDS,
n . ri mouth. Iml.
J - - - ' T
4
C
HAS. II. REEVE, ATTORNEY AT LAW
J L Notary Public,. .
.Plvniouth, Ind.
H
OR ACE COR BIN, ATTOR N KY AT LAW
Plymouth, lud.
H
omit fc rORTER. ATTOWCBTO AT.
LAW,.
.Plvniouth, Ind.
1 AML. B. CORBALEY, NOTARY PUBLIC,
I'lvinfiiith. Ind.
rARY PUBL1
Plvmouth, Ind.
f-piIEO. A. LEMON, PHYSICIAN, SUR
X GEON ti Drust, riymouth, Ind.
UFIIS BROWN, PHYSICIAN Si .SUR-
iiW3$,. riymouth, Ind.
Ol HIGG1NIJ0TJIAM, PHYSICIAN k SÜR-
.GLON,.
. .Plymouth, Ind.
0
IN
TEiiEMlAii SHERMAN, ru 1 -1 rnn
.SURGEON,.
.. Plvniouth, Ind..
.- TT W. B EN NET, PI 1 Y-Sl CIA N &' SUK-
GEON, Plvmouth, Ind.
C
1HAS. WF-ST, ECLECTIC PHYSICIAN,
l ivmoutn, iml.
J
B. DOOLITTLE, ECLECTIC PHY-
sician Plymouth Ind.
J.
D. GRAY, Eclectic Phvsician,
Plymouth, Ind.
K
LINGER & PRO. DEALERS IN LUMBER
... . t T I
etc, rlymoutn, inu.
1
G
ENRY M. LOGAN k Co.,. DEALERS IN
LUMBER ic, Plymouth, Ind.
EO. P. VANIIORN, DEALER IN LUM
BER ic Plymouth, Ind.
3
PATTERSON, DEALER IN VÄ-
riou kinds of Meat, Plymouth, Ind.
IVERY STABLE BY WM. M. PATTER-
I on, Plvmouth, Ind.
A
USTIN FULLER. MANUFACTURER
And dealer in Flour riymouth, Ind.
PUR! PUR! PUHÜ
he highest cash -u ."ee r..ül f..p Primi Mink mwl
T
Coousltinahy
J- F. VAN VALKENCURGIL .
A tho Post One.
BLANK NOTES, OF. AN IMPROVED
etjle, for eale at Tum Oricc
t(crici) Joctrn.
TIS ALL ONE TO MR
FROM THE GEatMAK.
Oh, tf? all one to mc, all one.
Whether I've money, or whether I've none.
He who has money can buy a wife,
And he who has none can be free lor life.
He who has money can trade if he choose,
And he who has. none has nothing to lose.
He who has monev has cares not a few,
And he who has none can sleep the niht thro.
He who lias monov can si mint at the fair,
And lie who has none escapes from much care.
He who has money can 0 to the play,
And he who has none at home can sta
He who has money can travel about,
And he who has none can go without.
He who has money can be coarse as he will,
And he who has none can be coarser still.
He who has money can eat oysters meat,
And he w ho has none the shell can eat.
I f e w ho has money can drink foreign wine,
And he who has none with the gout will not
pine.
He who has money the cash must nay,
And he who has none, says, 'charge it, pray'.'
' He who has money keeps a dog if he please,
And he who has none is not troubled with fleas.
He who has money must die one day.
And he who lias none must go the same way.
Oh, 'tis all one to me, all one,
Whether I've money, or whether I've none!
From Chamber's Journal.
Mr. BROWN S LAST ASCENT.
One fine summer morning, a few years
since, there was a wonderful excitement in
f., t -i, v:iL,rri. ,,f T? .IK- b...K-- All tb..
1 1
i 1
' t.oWards sunK' "bj,'c; iu lho c"nt"' w icil
I timcci the nucleus.f ihy crowd.
i Vea, then, what's the name of iu all, at
'all?' demanded one ragged (tusson.
j 'Is it tied to llie tail of it he's roino; to o-o
p?' nsked another.
, , , . .
Ah, don t be foolish! cx-
V
la i med at! old
man, the '."ieiise-cai 1 i-r' of the district,
'don't ve see the long ropes he's going to
hold on by'?'
'"Well, well!' groapod an old woman, ta-
kingher thtJecu, or short black pipe out of
her mouth and stickingit, lightcdas it was, ;
w:,l.:.. tl... r.,1.1. ,,f iu.r eioss-barred nocker-!
barred nocker-
, - hief; 'them English are mighty quare p
. . . . . .
pie. 1 m sure when we heard that this 3
ieo-
Mr.
Brown, with his sacks of gold was coming
... . . .
t JlitcJarm, alter buying out the stock ot
. . ' P. . .
tuC Deasys, we thought he d have carriages
:U1(1 ll)1 s s alor,"-nu J ma) a in
the harbor; but it never entered the heads;
f any f us that nothing less would serve
him than going eoorsing through tho air
like a wild goose at the tail of a ballone, or j
j whatsomever thev call it.'
For gm0 time past tlie procoss 0f ifla.
I ting the balloon had I een going on; and
, ... . .
great gayjy painted orb towered
tremulous above tho leads of the gaping
spectators, and pressing against the cords
by which it was held down, it seemed only
to await the arrival of the bold aeronaut
to dart upward on its way.
'Here he is!' exclaimed the stragglers of
the crowd; and present!- a carriage drew
up,and outstepped Mr. Brown, the English
millionare, who had lately become an Irish
landed proprietor. Mr. Brown was a l'.ttle
dapper man, whom a very small amount of
pugilistic force would have sufficed to lay
level with the soil of his adoption. He was
one of those unlucky individuals who meet
an accident at every turn who, in enter
ing a room, invariably slip, tumble knock
down some piece of furniture, or sit down
beside their chair instead of upon it. He
seldom escaped UDScttiii'r his inkstand!
j,
way,' and then coughing and choking for
half an hour; cutting his fingers, tearing
his coat, or knocking his forehead against
a door, so he rarely appeared in society
without scars, plasters, or bandages. In
practicing gymnastics he had knocked out
three teeth; in yachting .at Cowcs he had
been four times iiearly drowned; in shoot
the moors, in Scotland he liad lett
I- S7 '
trie grouse iv.harmed, but had blown off
twoiiif his fingers. A taste fjr,pvrotechny
iadsingeLbandsoniely his eye-brows, hair,
and whisker;, and as to railway traveling,
his hair breadth sertpes and moving acci
dents amid coll isions, upsets and explosions,
would have served to fill two or three vol
ume of the Knglish Hull way Library, or
tho French JiiUioshsque des Ctemius tie
Fcr.
"At lengthhaving tried the three elements
of earth, water and fire, it occurred to Mr.
Brown that the remaining one of air, as
medium of locomotion, might be more a
grecable, and could not be more perilous,
than the others. He accordingly the year
before, when residing on his estate in Dev
onshire, had purchased an excellent bal
loon, and, strange to say, had made sever
al ascents, and had come down again in per
fect safety. On this occasion he meditated
a flight over tho green Isle, and intended
to como down at Belfast; but tho best in
V
formed members of the crowd asserted that
ho was going 'overy step of the way to
Ameriky.'
PLYMOUTH, IND. JANUARY 3, 1856.
A London friend, who had come to Ire
land on a fishing excursion, had promised
to join Mr. Brown in his flight; but, as it
would seem, his courage failed, and he
came not. Nowise discouraged, however,
Mr. Brown was just about to step into the
arrial car, when a tall strongly built man
suddenly stepped forward, and politely sa
luting the a?ronaut, said: 'May I ask you
a question Sir?'
'Certainly.'
'Is it true that you arc going to Ameri
ca.'
No; merelv to Belfast, wind and weather
permitting.'
'Belfast,' repeated the stranger in a mu
sing manner 'the north of Ireland, "Well,
that is just the direction toward which I
want to go, and I hate land traveling.
Will you, Sir, accept me as a companion?'
Mr. Brown hesitated for a moment, but
as he really wished for some one to accom
pany him he saw no serious objection to the
plan, and accordingly signified his acqui
escence, meroly remarking to the stranger
that Iiis costume seemed to light for the re
gions of cold air which they would have to
traverse. !
'Bah!' was the reply. I have passed
through more changes of climate than that,
and 1 am happily very robust.'
'Well,' said Mr. Brown, looking at the
massive frame of the unknown, 'my car is
large enough. Come, in the name of Prov
ence!' !5o they took their places, .ind
the word was given; 'Let go!'
The fifteen men whose hands were se
verely piessed by the straining cords, de
sired nothing better, and in a moment the
iY.o 1 l.:.liooii began to pail majestieally.
li e crowd sh.'U.ed and clapped their
hands.
'Ali!, cri'-d Mr.. Brown, 'this is delight
ful. Don't you think so?' Not receiving
anv answer, he turned and looked at his
traveling companion. There he was, lying!
almost flat on his face and hands, with his j
head over the side of the car, his eyes were ;
fixed, his hair bristling. j
Are you afraid? asked Mr. Brown. !
.V answer. 1 he oaiioon as?enüed rapid-;
y, and ere long arrived at the region of the j
clouds. Turning once more to his immo- i
v:il.le romnnnLm Mr ltrr.wn r1iw1- li !
- " t .. .......
slightly by the arm, and said: 'Are you j
ill? btill no reply but a fixed and stolid
stare. They were now at a great elevation;
clouds lay beneath finite space around
them.
buddenly the stranger stood upright, his J
face pallid as that of a corpse.
'Faster! faster!' he exclaimed in a tone
of authority; and seizing in succession three
of the bags of sand which served as ballast,
he flung them out of the car, at the same
time laughing in a strange, wild manner, j
Ha!' he cried, 'that's the way to travel!
We shall distance the swallow, we shall
tower above the eagle. When I was in the
Abruzzi with my rifle in my hand, watch
ing for st ray't ravelers, I never felt so excited
as I do now. Then their lives were in dan
ger, now it is my own.'
Very pleasant! thought the owner of the
balloon, I have picked up some rascally j
Italian brigand.
'Better to fight with the elements than
with custom-house officers?' continued his
companion. The Balloon ascended at a ter
rific rate. In his turn Mr. Brown stood up,
and laving his hand on tho stranger's arm
said: . " "
'For Heaven's sake, don't stir! Our lives
are at stake. I miut allow some of the gas
o
to escape, in order to repair your impru
dence.' 'How do you do that?'
'I have only to draw this string, which
is connected with tho valve.'
'And if you had not that resource, what
would bo tho consequence?'
'We should continue to ascend until
everything would burst faom excessive di
hraon.' The man continued for a few moments
in deep thought; then suddenly drawing
out a knife, he cut the cord a high as he
could räch.
; 'Fatiter!" faster!' he reiterated The stran
ger was a giant compared whh Mr. Brown,
who, perceiving that ho could obtain noth
ing by force, began to try conciliation.
'Sir said he in a soothing tone, 'jou aro
a Christian I make no doubt. Well, our re
ligion forbids homicide!'
'Faster!' shouted the "Lint; and seizimr
the remaining sacks of sand, ho scattered
their contents to the clouds. Mr. Brown
fell on his knees.
'Ah!' ho exclaimed, 'if you have no re
gard for your own life, at least havo some
pity on mine. I am young, ,rich, happy; I
have a mother and sister; in their name,-.!
conjuro you to stretch your hand up to. the
valve, and save us from a dreadful death by
allowing some gas to escape.'
'Shaking his wild locks, the strauger drew
off his coat, and exclaiming: 'We aro not
ascending!' flung it out.
'Your turn now!' ho continued; and with
out the smallest ceremony ho despoiled tho
unfortunate- Brown of his paletot, andwant to mount higher!
throw it over.
The balloon pursiVd ' its wild career
without stop or stay .
'IIa! ha!' said the s
anger, while we'er
thus climbing so plJisantly towards the
sky, I'll tell you a itory shall I? His
unhappy companion did not stir. Already
from the extreme rarity bf the air, the
blood was gushing from Ijs eyes and cars.
'Listen! Three years ag I lived in Mad
rid. I was a widower, jSvith one little
daughter, a gentle, brighteyed angel; her
long curling hair waving this moment be
fore my eyes. One day I went out early,
and did not return until late; my child, my
beautiful Emma, was golie; banditti had
come and stolen her away from me. But
my friend have you a cannon here?' Mr.
Brown made mechanically a sign iu the
negative. 'What a pity! I would have
bombarded Spain! Ever since I have
searched for ray child in every country of
Europe; but iu vain. Now I think she
may be in tho north of Ireland. Have' yon
a lucifer-match here?' Mr Brown made
no reply but shook his head. 'You have
not? Ah! if I could get one, I would set
the balloon on fire: and then, when reduced
to ashes, it would be much lighter? When
von first saw me this morning I vas oxam
ining the stupid faces of yon crowd, to
see if the dark foreiini one of mv Emma's
robber might be among them.'
It was evident to poor Mr. Brow n that
his travelling companion was a confirmed
lunatic. A sudden idea struck him
What is your name?'
Gerald Annesly
'The very same'
'What mean you?
I know where the wretch lives who
stole your child; we arc now just above the
spot. Draw the valve, Mr. Annesly, and
in a short time you will embrace your Em
ma
9
'No, no, you are deceiving me. Mv Em-
ma is not on earth: she is in Heaven. Last
jht she appeared to me in a dream, and
toid me so. That's the reason I want to
aSCend higher. Come, my friend help me;
lct us both blow as hard as we can on the
balloon. As we are beneath, our breath
must help it to rise. Blow! blow!'
Mr. Brown moved and tried to obey.
,1. .1 . o .
ji, noes not sin . conit', mount, on my
shoulders and push the ball n!'
And w ithout consulting him any further
the giant caught him up as if ho had been
a feather, and held him above his head say-
Xow push the balloon !'
j The unlucky victim tried rto obey, but j
j the blood blinded his eyes. There
was a horrible buzzing in his ears, and
lights flashed before him, for a moment
he thought of throwing himself over in or -
dor to end his torments.
'IIa!' shouted the madman, 'it does not :
At that moment the trembling hand
of Mr. Brown touched accidently the cord
cftho safety valve. He made it play,
and the collapsing orb began to descend
rapidly. Through the clouds it darted
downward, and the earth reappeared.
.Ah!' cried Annesly, 'instead of push
ing the balloon, as I told you, you drew it
downward. Push I say!'
'You see I am pushing as hard as lean.'
No; for here is tho earth!'
It id only that tho clouds ar rising tow
ard the upper regions.
'Well, let us do the same. Lct us
! throw out all our ballast.'
'We havo nomore."
Gerald Annesly laid Mr. Brown gently
in the bottom of the car.
'We have no more, ballast you say? he
asked looking fixedly at him.
'No more.' 7 . ..
'How much do you weigh?' This
question fell on poor Brown like a stuuning
blow. 'How much do you weigh?' repeat
ed his companion in a louder tone.
. 'Ah, very little; nothing that could make
the slightest difference a mere trifle.'
A mcro trifle! Well, even that 'will
make some difference.' Thon imminence
of the peril gave our teronaut presence of
mind.
My friend,' said he, 'your child is not
dead. I saw her last week near Belfast.
She is living with a family, who love Iter
and treat her as . their own. In a very
short time, if you will allow us to descend,
you will meet her.' Tho madman looked
at him with a wild doubting gaze,
'Yes,' continued . Urown eagerly, anx
ious to confirm tho impression he had mad.
you will soo her, your darling Emma, run
ning to meet you with outstretched arms,
and h:r fair golden curls waving in the
wind'-
. 'You lie! Emma's hair was as black as
jetl. .Man! you never saw her! How
much do you weigh?'
Ah! a mere nothing; only a few pounds!'
Gerald Annesly seized Mr. Brown with
both hands and held him suspended over
tho side of tho car. In anothor moment he
would have dropped him into the abyss of
space.
Annesly!' exclaimed the poor man, 'you
Yc! ye!'
'Your only wish is to lighten the bal
loon!' 'Yes.'
'Then how much do you weigh your
self?' .
'Two hundred pounds.'
'Well, if you were to throw yourself
over, the balloon lightened of such a great
weight, would dart upward with inconceiv
able rapidity
The madman reflected for a moment.
'lrue,' He laid Mr. Brown in the bot
torn of the car, and stared Avildlv around.
."r,- -...!-.m." l,.- T .v.-. ,.. 'n i
- , , .., , 0 -, . .
and mv chilu; my Emma! Ana flintmio;
' J 0 0
himself over disappeared.
Tho balloon and its owner reached the
earth in safety; the latter however, lay for
many weeks raving in brain fever. When
he recovered he gave orders to have his
perilous plaything sold at any sacrifice, and
soon afterward piovided himsolf with an
excellent cure laker, in tho l:apy of a prct-
ty young wife, under' whose tutelage 'the
masther,' as his Irish vabt remarks, 'is
growing a dale more hand v in himself So
this was Mr. Browns last ascent to the
clouds.
The Valley of Mexico.
All travelers and historians speak of the
remarkable purity of the atmosphere of the
valley of Mexico, and the peculiar rich
I tlnts with which tlie'11't' FS"J? tluougii
1.1.1 !
j the thin medium, invests every object, pie
scntingto the eye one of the most glowing
and deli 'ious views that ever met the ad
miring gaze of man. There probably is no
city in tho world which presents such n.it-j
! ural charms around it as that of Mexico, j
I 1 M ,. 11- "! .
and wo can easily conceive
of the deli' 'lit
o
ltlL 11 .ULA U.
wmcli tnev impart wiien tJiev hrst break
i i ,i , . ,
upon the vision of the beholder. Invading
armies have momentarily paused at the
sight, impressed by the splendor of the
.1 .1... I,. . -.r !.. ....t..
iew, aim inu ncuii "i ine ginn .u i joi a j
have felt their stern purposes relaxing, asj
they gazed' upon the enchanting scene,
which rven the decay of time aud the ds-
olation of w ar cannot deprive of iis match-
l.io l.......t I.... t- .:..t,, l. -w 1
conqueror, Cortz, standing on a command -
, . ,
mg height, above the luxurious home of
n 3 Ä .
Montezuma, the Hcene of bavbartespletidor,
and ooking with unspeakable delight up -
. 1
on the rich prospect spread be lore him in
ill
IAllUlll.3. A IVOWll I lie IIWUU
the vallev below, where the romotest ob-
jects possessed a brilliancy of coloring and
a sharpness of outline that seemed to an
nihilate distance. The scene, though sad-
ly changed since then, and now exhibiting
the marks of decay which time, neglect,
and the hand of violence have impressed
upon it, possesses much of the natural
beauty that then distinguished it. The
same hills, valleys, lakes, mountains,
streams and towering cedars that greeted
the intoxicated vision of the Spanish con
queror, and clothed the view with such
charms, met the eyes of our own brave
countrymen, as they approached the Aztec!
Capital. But the aspect of the city itself
is entirely changed, rnd w ould not be rec
ognized at this day as the proud place v. Inch
once, bv
its magnificence, astonished a
warrior accustomei
.il to the splendor oi on3j
ltrioö of tho eastern cc:i-'
i , , ,
of the richest count r
tincnt. The Like o Tescuco. which onW
entirely riuriounded aud traversed with its
canals, the imperinl city, hs receded scv -
oral miles. Then it was only approachable
through no now cause ways, built of olid
masonry; the houses the in solve 3 .Unding
on piles iu the water now, the city stands
upon the main land, high and dry. Then
villages lined the shores of the lake, ar.d
floating gardens danced gently on the un-
dulations of the waves. MoiC than orien-
tal splendor was everywhero visible, the
ruins of which are still to be traced by the
cautious traveller. The aspect of the city
is noAv Spanish; a Christian cathedral rears'
its front where the horrid teoculli once r.iis- J sight to tfoo tvo old people who h.wc worth
ed its infernal alters, red w ith the blood of'ered the storm nnd basked in the sunshine
human victims, devoted alivo to the sacri
ficial knifo by tho barbarous religion of the
country, to propitiate tho deities that were
supposed to preside over the destinies of
Mexico. These changes were effected bv
the people w hose descendants seem devoted
to the same fato that awaited the ancient
Mexicans al tho hands of the Spaniards.
Three hundred years "of rule in American
hands, would present probably as broad a
contrast, but how different in its character
f-oni that the Spaniards created! Tlie
country would be improved iu - every re
spect, under tho domination of the indefat
igibit Yankee, who never puts hand to any
thing susceptible of improvement, without
altering its character for tho better; its rich
resources would bo develoed, and applied
to the relief of humn wants and. the in
crease of human cofnforts. A population,'
increased manifold in numbers would be
spread over the country, and race of en
lightened, independent people- would add
their strength to the perpetuation of free
and republican principles in their purity I
and power. Pa, Ledger.
The abuse of money is worso than the
want of it.
PREMATURE MATRUxONY.
2Iarriage is a divine and beautiful ar
rangemcnt. It was designed by Provi
dence not solely as the means of keeping
up population, or as a mere social and eco
nomical convenience, but as the blending
of two spirits into one the masculine rep
resenting 'wisdom,' the feminine 'affection
When there is a true t-piritual affinity be
tween the two, then the design is accom
plished. Premature marriages are among the
, e 1 l ill
greatest evns of tho times; and it would)
1 not be a bad idea in theso days 01 reforms,
. ....
! it an 'anti-m;a rvinir-in-a-hut rv sociciy vere
instituted. Nov. a days people leap into the j
ntagic lue circle with no more coiisiueri-
lion than they would partr.ko of a dinner j
little, thinkino- that when onee in. thev are i
. i , ,,M , Jarocin that has not been properly ventila-
t ne re until tneir end comes, lhero is but ... r 1 J
. ,1 , f,' i ted during the day.
little, sometimes no mutual analysis of d:s-;
position, and comparison of tacieaud üc- ' 2cVer SJtyr m a draUSut of air'
tlons. They seem to fancy iht, it lhra Ltv ' .mlc L" ""-nrsally violated, but
any discrepancies, the fatal Cotdian knot, a Jr:u,-1it öf air is generally hurtful, more
which canle seldom cut and never untied, i I,: "c c??c tlinn anotllyr- and more CSF"
will harmon-ze all.
The numbers who have felt this truth
the" numbers .till feelin- it to their heart's
Core are i n calculable
,ri , ., I
Inev recognise it!
as the great mistake of their lives
'pjpj
chain is nottotheni a silken on?, but a t.i -
j ble of iron, that tightens around them more
and more, chrushing all hope und energy,
substituting hatö foi-lvr and -rit 1 ! iuf
p. A, ,.r t. ,
with its l ti-tthe very inner life ol tt.e soul. :
1P , ' .
Boys ana girls now marrv io u Bieter :
' .
extent than ever beiore, instead ot waiting;
... . . ... , ,
till thev become full grow n and matured j
r, , , i
i "' "" Mv.ii-.iii , vi... . - .
, p . . . , ,. ,
ll he gets out of short jackets p.iul linds a
. . . . .. .
1.. T. u .i. i . . i.
; n.wjtirze gameren on jus upper up uiu
the voting mies, as soon a sIk
emerges
from the nurserv and abbreviated frocks
think th?y are qualified to assume tlu most
coh.nni rv.ititiisiliilit(. of Ufr
And so
- vy'"-"" j
'IV and 'Ma' won't consent, they post oft'j
to some Gretna (Jreon, and there take obli-
gations they will never cease bitterly to re-
pent.
i liri-i:iTi sli..iil(l liiH-pr lif the resu t.
i . . - - " " ' " " " '
'i. , , aiesy warm, ami never sn near tne lire,
! fancy. 1 he ball-room and the evening par-, -
.'4 iii i' . t-i'11- E;it jour meals at regular hours; tat
My rarely develop. real character. Luder J
i i i -i i e t i .ii Huwly, chew every mouthful well, and do
the exhileratuig luniietice ot taeiiance, the i ' - . . .
i e i- i i .i m j : not swallow u until it is properly mixed up
! gl-'-re ot lights and the merry tquib and 1 -
ii .1 l i With saliva. If pos.ible, take about half
J'e, the dissolute young man may appear; 1
t . i n Ii. iii r to own mon ainl Tuivr oi t.
amiable, and that slatternly scold, lovelv
Matches made at .-aich places, or umlor tim
ilar circumstances, are not of the class that
originated in heaven. They more general
ly are conceived in the opposite place, and
bring forth only iniquity. The true way
to learn each other is to do it at home, in !
the parlor, in the kitchen, and occasions that
. , , ., ,. , ,
unions Hi the almost daily divorces thr.t ;.ij
. J .
taking place, in the running av.a ot bus-
, . , . . . , i
bands, leaving their wivei r.nd cmldrci to !
. v,
starve, and the elonemcnt of v.wv.-. iotJ
'
! only this, but we vitness it in tho hroen-j
spirited men, msde old iu the prhr.e of life,
riirugirling on for mere food s no clothing.
ainUhelt;.-, ami in women on.-?, du ty,
fclutnsh and wrinkled.
ItVYouldLMiuiteimpossdforuUode-
I r " i 11 1, I f 1 Ii
pict laittiiuin lac nitiitiiuue oi T.nyicai;
and me. a! evils thrt result frc ihecesinful j
i
alliances for sinful they are. They xuin
j tho body, corrupt tbe morale a d .'rt.lltlfy
jthe mind. .nd the resu! I does i.ot ctop
' with hu.3b?.nd ai d ",.ifo. Tlire "re the
children, the. paitakc of tho fecblens; iud;it
j vices o. the parents, both physical and r.ior-
a, r.u't go ot into inc Lu-y .rorld oti.ut.-d
ai.il gnarled. God pity th.m
A,.'e would ne t bs understood ai speaking ,
gainst ths institution of marrir.ge. It is!
jholy, ' b5utifnl, and beniiicent. But let j
'everyone take his mate or none. J. et not
I the brave eagle pair with the. stupid owl
. nor the gentle dove with the carrion crow.
Like rhviiild have like. Iiis a glorious!
of life, go hand andhand lovingly and truth-
fully down the gentle declivity of time, with
no angers, no jealousy, nor hatreds gainer
ed up against each other, and looking with
hopes and joy to the everlasting youth of
heaven, where they two shall be one forev
er. ' That is true marriage for it is the
marriage of spirit with spirit. Tho oc is
woven into a woof of gold, that neither time
nor eternity can sever.
The following Banks are reported to
have failed: Monson, Massachusetts; Cen
tral, Rhoda Island; Ellsworth, Maine; Or
no, do; Monsum Itiver, do; South Hoyal
ton, Vt.; People's Derby Line, do.
A largo amount of eastern is coming
west, and it is well enough to 6tand from
under. Gold und ßiirer arc safer
ÄsrA Good Thiko A Corresponded
of th Washington Union, who subscnoec
himsolf 'An Old Whig' it is odd that h
hould ever have got there says:
"Lei not the Whigs be humbVd because
Li . t1rtv nas hoon swallowed. The
their p?rty has been swallowed
whale, swallowed Jonah; Jonah was heard
of afterwards, the whale, never.
fa-A.iom n.v.r Tunew what itwas tobe
la uoyi :
NO. 8.
GOLDEN RULES.
In a recent work on Homceopathy, by
Dr. Hempel, are the following "Twelve
Golden . llules" for the preservation of
health. Although they express no new
thought, they put into convenient shape
mar.y important principles of hygiene,
which cannot bo repeated too often.
1. Rise early, and make it a point to re
tire at ten o'clock; seven hours sleep should
suffice; although less may do in some cases,
ar.d in others more may be required.
n "-, .u t,1.. f... I. .1 4..
- - . tisii 0111 ii.-i; v'ni 11 win 11vM.11 i
-
loot, wii:i com vaier, cery morning, iin-
ter and summer, immediately on leaving
tTie bed, and rub yourself with a flesh-brush
.... ,
j . J
mg.
3. Never i:leep in a warm room, nor in
!wn r-,lsU,iS arc vcr-neau.
Dvc ht':4 the season, butlw
I "vt 10 !wve ff Ur vintCr clot,lCS
bet ie ih? warm either has fairly set in.
, . , , ,, , . , , ,
J-iua luie siiuutu ue jianicuianj ouscneu
; A'1.
I !.v iteons who arc subiect to sore throat.
I bronchitis, and such-like weaknesses.
I. Avoid ?11 kinds of heavy and indi-
gciiiblc focd such as rich pastry.fit.heavy
farinacoUr; diet, Würm bread, spice mustard
1
pepper, tvc.
1 11 . . , . ... ,
7. Avoid a 1 stimulating drinks, braudy
, . , . .
beer, wine, and conteut yourself with cold
, . , ,
water, milk, light and unsnieed chocolate,
i . , , , .
i weak: black ler., and syrups made ot cur
1 . 1
i rantK- r.isnITris. strawlHTries. or oth-i
-r 1 - - -
ispoernes, strawberries, or otiier
kinds of whlesome and medicinal purpo
ses. C. Neerkecp on wet or damp clothes
jj.! and never sleep on damp sheets.
0. Do not expose yourselves to the keen,
sharp w inds, and always avoid the raw and
damp evening air.
IU. Live as nearly as possible in the
same temperature; keep your room moder-
I j 1 1 . 1 f
much as to leave the table with a sense of
repletion and oppression; do not forget to
clean your tootle with a soft tooth brush af
ter eating, and never indulge iu the abom
inable habit of picking tl.eui.
12. Avoid evi ry kit I of food that natu
rally di.-n'r. . s with ou: '..?; r little oxr-
j cite :i! .ic oocii
.r v i i i u;V, but not i I
oerv Lii of wctti ;; Select narticularlv
hi.i UV..C.I g Kiru ot .,o;Ui.r for a walk or
. , - ,
ride; e.tpoo.i.re : i.;tr., r dnmp weather
. , , ,
!ie er uoe-i rti-v i cu . anv od.
' . , ' '' . .. -
I n- .-. twelve i'c .tiiil.n nil. "a lu
1 obf:ervMioe of "hi -h -.'.n ic.orUi impress-
j j t n;u. h , ; r,. v-vn
the attention
f iofth- r.ho are ;.nxiot; to preserve their
j nJ fr00 lhrf my UQ.
r,nt filing, whicli r.w act to trouble
, (l5i -j t . 1 -
j,y.,:eilj(. pux. utli
I Joh
A räch .V;:.
A jontl-rmnii in th's place played off a
rich jck. er. i i belle h.f Vh : other day.
Toeing foniethhiir r f .'.n etilcu: he took
into h'-s lu.'.u,"- (r fun, ttxi he would
jhk.to h:..'. r. iS.-zt-KlinT.er. S ad-
di easing he . note, pchtcly inionmng her
tht 'a gentleman of hor f.cqu:iii:t.inco an
dd rn(i tru? fix:;d, A.or.ld dine with her
that da v.' As soon as she received it, all
linds went to vork to g-t everything in
in order. Precisely at i 2 o'clock tho was
prepared to receive h?rguet." The house
v.a: as clean as a new pin; a sumptuous
dinner was on the tnble 'nd she was ar
rayedf n her best attire. A gentle knock
was heard, and she Martd with a palpita
ting heart to the d -or. ' She thought it
was an e!d friend: perhaps f. brother; from
the place wherc-Jthey firsst moved. On o- '
pening tlv door, she ar her husband with
a smiling court ;m.uce. j
Why my dear, says she in an anxious I
tone, 'where is the gentleman you spoke of
ia your note?' j
Whv,' wiid her husband coinplacntly, j
here he Y
You said gentleman, jJT my acquaintance j
an old and tried friend, would dine wiihf
us today.' J
Well,' said he, good humoredly, 'am)
not 1 a gentleman of your acquaintance,
and an old true friend?'
Oh!' said she distressingly, 'is there no
body else but you?' '
Well I declare this is too bad, Ban? hi'
- . j
wifa, in an angry tone. ;
Tht husband laughed immoderately .-j
His better half said snej-'lt-Jke givin;
him a tongue-lashing but ' .
down cozily together, and for e N
a good dinner without having cor
Jealousy is a foolish thing, and "v
makes ono lose bis eoneca,
it
V. '
iL

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