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Marshall County Democrat. (Plymouth, Ind.) 1855-1859, April 17, 1856, Image 1

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MAESMLL
DEMOORAT;
fii ii
i i
THE BLESSINGS OF GOVERNMENT, LIKE THE DEWS OF HEAVEN, SHOULD FALL ALIKE UPON THE RICH AND THE POOR JACKSON.
A-
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A
VOL.. 1,
usintss ptuttoti).
Business Cards not exceeding three lines, inser
ted under this head, at $1 per annum.
Persons advertising in the "Democrat' by the
year, will be entitled to a Card i i the Business Di
rectory, without additional charge.
Ularsfall (founts Bcmocntt
JDB PRINTING OFFICE.
We have on hand an extensive assortment of
And are prepared to execute
JOB MD
VIW PIHYWIYf!
Ill If i iliUl 1 lllilllilU.
Of every description and quality, such as
CIRCULARS,
HANDBILLS,
LABELS,
CATALOGUES,
famphlets,
business cards,
blank deeds a
mortgages;
And in short. Blanks of every variety and descrip
tion, on the shortest notice, k on reasonable term
PLYMOUTH BANNER, BY W. J. BURNS,
Plymouth, Ind.
. . .Tr.T. iv
ii Drv GorU and Groceries, first door east of
ROWNLEE & Sillium I ULlu. r
Michigan street, 11 nth'Jd
uook"T1:vns1)e,lers in dry
Goods and Groceries, corner Michigan and
La Torte street.-" Plymouth, Ind.
PALMER. DEALER IK DRV GOODS A j
Groceries, south corner La Porte and Mich-
m .1 T 1 I
c
ifpin streets,
.Flvinouth, lud.
NIL OGLESBEE & Co.. DEALERS IN
Drv Goods & Groceries, Brick Store Mich
igan street, Plymouth, Ind
ÖÜNCOUGLE, DEALER INDRY GOODS
and Groceries.corner of Michigan and Gano
streets
.Plvmouth, Ind.
ESTERVELT k IIEWIT, DEALERS j
w
?n Drv Goods k Groceries, Plymouth, Ind.
G
S. CLEAVELAND, DEALER IN DRY
y Goods, H.inlware, etc.,.. I'lymoutn, inu.
M
RS. DUNHAM, MILLINER & MAN 11 A
Maker, Plymouth, Ind.
BROWN k BAXTER, DEALERS IN :
Stoves. Tinware, kc, Plvmouth, Ind. I
l
H
R. PERSUING Co., DEALERS IN
. Drugs and Medicine'",. . .Plymouth, Ind.
A
DAM VINN EDGE, WHOLESALE
and Retail Grocer,
Plymouth Ind.
XV.FroTisions, Plymouth, Ind. j
Xv7lMVIrs.DI)LE A N DI I A R N ESS !
J . M.iker
.Plvmouth, Ind.
A
YRES BALDWIN, MANUFACTURER I
of Boots Ji bhoes, Plymouth, Ind
W
M. L. PIATT, MANUFACTURER OF
Cabinet Ware, . . .
. Plymouth, Ind. I
S
LUYTER & FRANCIS
HOUSE CARPEN-
i. r.ik Joinf-rs,
. . .Plymouth, Ind
M
IV. SMITH, JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
West side Michigan St., Plymouth, In I.
E
t.l IATT 1- Tn M.VITrAfTITIIf-.RS CiV
A Wagoa, Cartiages k Plows, Plymouth, Ind.
C
10LLINS k NICHOLS, MANUFACTUR-
ers of Sash ic Plvmouth, Ind.
B
ENJ. BENTS, BLACKSMITH,
Plymouth, Ind.
-
A
K. BRIGGS, BLACKSMITH,
Plymouth, Ind,
D
A G U E R R EOT Y r ES , BY J. E. ARM
STRONG, Plymouth, Ind.
A LOON, BY M. H. TIDBITS,
Plymouth, Ind.
A
MERICAN HOUSE, BY G. P. CHERRY
&. SON, Plymouth, Ind.
E
EDWARDS' HOTEL, BY W.C. EDWARDS
Plymouth, Ind.
A
C. CAPRON, ATTORNEY i COUN
pelor at L--w, Plymouth, Ind.
HAS. H. REEVE, ATTORNEY AT LAW
k Notary Public, Plymouth, Ind.
II
ORACECORBIN, ATTORNEY AT LAW
Plymouth, Ind.
PI
ODGES k PORTER, ATTORNEYS AT
LAW, Plymouth, Ind.
SAML. B. CORBALEY, NOTARY PUBLIC,
Plymouth, Ind.
BROWN, GENERAL LAND AGENT
Plymouth, Ind.
rjHEO. A. LEMON, PHYSICIAN, SUR
I GEON k Druggist, Plymouth, Ind.
R
UFUS BROWN, PHYSICIAN & SUR
GEON, Plymouth, Ind.
s
HIGGINBOTHAM, PHYSICIAN k SUR
, GEON Plymouth, Ind:.
W. BENNET, PHYSICIAN & SUR-
GEON, Plymouth. Ind.
D. GR A Y , Eclectic Phtsiciax,
Plymouth, Ind.
K
LINGER k BRO. DEALERS IN LUMBER
etc, Plymouth. Ind.
3
PATTERSON, DEALER IN VA-
riouskind5 of Meat, Plymouth, lud.
LIVERY STABLE BY WM. M. PATTER
on, Plymouth, Ind.
A
USTIN FULLER, MANUFACTURER
And dealer in Flour Plymouth, Ind.
H
ENRY M. LOGAN k Co., DEALERS IN
Lumber, 4c Plymouth, Ind.
7T0SEPII POTTER, SADDLE k HARNESS
dJ Maker, Plymouth, Ind.
A
MERICAN HOUdE, G. P. CHERRY k
Son, Proprietors', Plymouth, Ind.
B
ARBERING AND HAIRDRESSING, BY
Alfred Billows Plymouth, Ind.
M
ITCHELL k WILCOX, MANUFACTU-
rers or now., &c, Plymouth, Ind
CLAIIX DEEDS AM MORTGAGES!
We now hare a good supply of Blank Dcf da'and
Mortgages, of an approved form printed in the
irst style of the art, on fine white folio post, und
"or sale at one dollar per quire, or five cints kinglo
ALSO, CLAIM IJ3TES ON HAND,
dprnttd to order on short notice. Justier
jhuiks printed to nit r, and on rca.onab terms a
. THrtOfTjre.
From the Democratic Pharos.
LldTJOR LAWSUPREME COURT
ATTACKS OF FUSIONISTS.
Abuse wi.hout measure has been heaped
upon the Democratic members of the Su
premo Court, coupled villi the grossest
misrepresentation of their motives. 'Whis
keyites Rum-suekers,' 'perjured Judges,'
drc, dr., are the key-notes for the Fusion
press and speakers. No epi:he:s are too
low or abusive to be aimed at the Democrat
ic Judges bv men who ought to have more
candor than to thus impugn the motives of j
men for whom they profess personal friend
ship, or at least respect. Last Saturday
ni-'ht, at the Democratic Club, Judge
Stuart was called upon for remarks.
His response was ordered by a vote of the
Club tobe published. Judge Stuart said:
Mr. President: Permit me to call your
attention a moment to the liquor question
not for the purpose of discussing it, I
leave that to others; but to note the style
! in which the temperance argument is cou
.lnr.ffl Tn mnneclion with the luiUori
" . . ,
Uxv tl,rt Kiinivmr ITniirl. has icon Visited i
At. I Vit V MBVN.-W x- w -
with unmeasured abuse. Tho English
language was not rich enough. They had
to coin new words. Even such men as
McDonald in the late tempemnc
convention, and Messrs. llanamau, i'leteli-
er, Blake, Dillon, Thompson, Mills and
Barry, in a late temperance circular to
the people of Indiana, lend themselves to
circulate slander against the Court.
In marked and honorable contrast is the
course of the Democratic party towards
Judge Gookins. lie was elected by the
Fusionists in 1854, and some claim partly
on the liquor issue. He sustained the
whole law in all Us details. Yet I am not
aware that any Democratic paper or public-
speaker l.as said a single word abusive of
Judge G. They differ with him in opiniou;
, , ,. . . , .
iiey believe his conclusionserroneous; they
canvass his arguments. This as u
should be. Of this no man of any party
nas a lignt to compiain. me opinion ui
just criiieism. If its reasoning and prin-
oiples are unsound, their fallacy should be
exposed.
From some men in the Fusion ranks no
j species of defamation would either surprise
or offomi Thl.:r consurc is the best evi-
, , . . ...
f uence oi rectituue. inetr approoauon is
but an index of some m-ntal or moral obli
quity. A prudent man would instinctively
suspect the soundness of his own opinions if
he concurred wi:h them.
But among those above named I reeog
nize wi.h surprise and regret some whom
I have hitherto highly estimated. I diJ
J not dream that under ihe guise of peisonal
friendship they would deliberately make an
assault bo pregnant alike with bad taste
and bad feeling. I never 1 ave, nor do I
now ptetend to notice the innumerable
pack that have been barking at the Court.
As responsible endorsers .f slander I pre
fer to deal with these gentlemen.
It is well known that there were some
things I did not approve and do not defend.
I only propose to intimate briefly my own
course and vindicate that. .
Jud-re McDonald's remarks in the tem
perance convention carry the idea that the
majority of the Court (Perkins, Davidson
and Stuart) were acting in concert with
M. Manville and the liquor men that
Manville told him as a settled fact months
before what the decision would be, and
how each Judge would stand. In the same
straii the temperance circular signed by
Fletcher, Blako &. Co., goes on in substance
thus: 'Rumor 6'iid that for the paltry suc
cess of a party, through tho votes of tho
rumseller and hi? satellites, the mandate of
the supreme judiciary would arrest the lav
in its course, but 6he was not bcliered.r
But still the report gathered strength and
consistency is assumed an air of authori
ty; it presumed to indicate tho position of
each of the Judges; aud then good men be
gan to tear, as the evil gathered conödeuce,
that it might not bo well in the issue. At
last that issue came first the decision of a
single Judge, and then the decision of the
Bench, and our wost fears were realized.'
Elsewhere they 6pcak of the iudustry of the
Court to support a position that had leen pre
determined. Answering only for myself, I pronounce
the insinuations contained in the above ex
tract an unmitigated falsehood.
The history of the liquor cases is ray best
vindication. When distributed by the
Clerk in tho order of submission, ono of
them fell to Judge Gookins tho other to
Judge Perkins. I had no case in my hands
involving the liquor question. I was in no
manner responsible c ither for the haste or
the delay of p-epv i'ig thse ca3s f r decis
ion, Fe sonallv I ii i i fivorof withholl-
ing theh-consi lera;i n ill the term previ us j ment. To ordinary intelligence the auihor
to tho meeti ig of the legislature; as had . i io.4 ched in the discussion and in the opin
been dor.e j:i the school cases. But the ion would he sufliciont ear-marks, AlmoU
parties and counsel, and finally the public,'
became urgent for a. dec ion ajvJ 1 reluct
antly yielded.
The meeting of the Court in July was
appointed to hear Argument in a railroad
PLYMOUTH, IND., APRIL 17, 1856.
case. The liquor cases were then submitted
and argued. The only consultation the
Court then had, was an hour or so the af
ternoon the public discussion closed. We
were .h n quite at sea. None of us seemed
to have any opinion. What little was said
related wholly to the details of the law.
Other business came in so pressing, ab
sorbing all our time, that we found it uec
essary to adjourn till Court in course.
This was done unanimously. The object
was partly to give time to mature cases
fr the- next term, but especially to ma
ture the liquor cases. Alter this adjourn
ment in July there could of course be no
opinion of the Court until the next term
on the fourth Monday in November.
The members of the Court were at Indi
anapolis in the latter, part of August; but
were not all there at the same time Judge
Gookins coming the afternoon lieft. So that
there was not even a consultation, and that
(consultation) is all that could have taken
place in vacation. At my room Judge Per
hins read some views which had occurred
lolnm in tho mihi; nrm.mont . nml whiel,
J 1
were afterwards matured and published in
the Herman case at Chambers. From these
views I promptly dissented: not doubting
m Am W
but that on further reflection he would also
abandon them.
Supposing that a re-argument could
scarcely fail to conduce to the unanimity of
the Court, I proposed that course in Au-
gust. During the argument in July, my at-'
tention was chiefly occupied with the de
tails. The question of legislative power had
not struck me forcibly. I was therefore
anxious for a re-argument on that sinirle
question the power of the legislature to
pass such a law. It was a question new in
judicial history. It n.eded elucidation and
reflection. Accordingly the second Monda,
of November was set and counsel notified.
But for some reason svhich I never fully
understood, the argument did not come off.
On that very day Judge Perkins opinion
in the Herman case at Chambers, appeared
in print.
That (the Herman case) was understood
to embody Judge Perkins' views. Two
weeks aLer. on the Saturday prior to the
public session, Judge Gookins presented
his opinion in consultation. Wi;h that
opinion I could not concur, and so intimated.
Up to this time I had no settled opinion of
my own now staggering under this ariru
ment and then under that. Nor did I up to
this time know what Judge Davidson's
views were. Hitherto I had paid no atten
tion to the liquor case) with any views of
wiiting an opinion; I had enough in my own
cases lo claim all my time and labor. I
picsumed that the Judges having the Beebe
cases specially in charge would exhaust the
subject and the authorities. In this I was
not disappointed. But m the course of
reasoning pursued and the conclusions ar
rived at, I could not concur with either.
To silently or briefly dissent was to open
the way to misrepresentation. I had there
fore no option but to write out my own
views.
Up, therefore to the eve of the public
session of Court, about the last of Novem
ber, I had no opinion on the liquor ques
tiononly that of a mere non-occurrence
with Messrs. Gookins and Perkins. Till
that time I did not fully realize the neces
sity of a separate opinion. During the
week of the public session at the State
House nothing further was done but to ap
point an early day for re-agument. This was
done chiefly at my instance. I was unwill
ing to determine a question so important
without hearing all that could be urged on
both sides.
Immediately after the public session the
opinion on the manufacturing case, includ
ing the agency, was written out at home
subject to such change as tho re-argument
might produce. The opinion on tho sale
was wholly prepared as published, after
the re-arguraent in December. In the opin
ion ou the sale, I had rcscived tho right,
whh the consent of the other Judges, to
revise the opiuion on tho manufacturing
and publish it at a future day; but one of
the Judges objected to that, and the sentence
to that effect was stricken out. So the opin
ion on that branch of the liquor question
still lies in my drawer.
That the opinion on the 6ale was prepar
ed afar the re-argument must have beeu
apparent to the counsel and to all who at
tended Court during its progress. Judge
McDonald must have been aware how large
ly I profited by that very able discussion.
Somo of the very men, who in their address
to the people of Indiana insinuate that the
course of the Court was predetermined,
were also present. They must have dull
eirs if they are nut awaro that the opinion
on the sale is based chiefly on that a.'u-
the only point that is pressed beyond the
poms of dUcussion, is the legl-htivo and
judicial history of the question. Even that
was suggested but njt elaborated by counsel.
To you, sir, all with whom I was on
terms of friendly intercourse for the last
year, I might appeal whether you knew my
opinion on the liquor question beforehand.
You knew that I was opposed to the law as
a measure of policy. You knew tha; in the
Legislature of 1051-2 I voted against the
Maine law as a quasi sumptuary law to
which no free people should submit. You
knew that as a private citizen I had in va
rious ways expressed the same sentiments
I opposed it too as bad temperance policy.
But that could have nothing to do with the
judicial question whether the Legislature
had the power to pass a foolish and odious
enactment. Did any cf-you know my opin
ion as a Judge on that question? No sir
for one reason, that I had none: and for an
other, that regard for judicial propriety
would have restrained such loquacLy. I
might appeal also to my intimate friends
the Clerk, Reporter, and Sheriff of the Su
preme Court. They were in my room sev
eral times during the preparation of the
opinion. They saw tho manuscript in
progress on my table. They knew it was
on the liquor questkn. But not one
of them knew the reasoning or the re
suit. Sir, there is one rule of judicial proprie
ty to which I have endeavored to conform,
and that is to observe every prudence in
relation to matters pending in Court. Nay,
more, I not only have not wished to hear,
but I have scrupulously ' ;ded every po
sition where I might be to hear any
thing which should be spoken only by
counsel in the presence of opposing coun
sel. Hence I endeavored to shun ultra
men of every shade. You all know that
I have no sympathy with ultraists or fa
natics, of any Und. I have never court
ed their favor. Between he advocate of
the 'inalienable right of free liquor' and
the rabid Maine law man I cannot readily
distinguish. Both are fanatics. Hence
I have shunned them both, because neither
were likely to throw liht on the judicial
path; nor were they in any event legi.imate
mediums of communication wi:h the
Court.
If, therefore, anyone pretended to know
my opinion, such pretence was utterly ftlse:
both because I held no such communica
tion with any one, and because I had i.ot
in truth for months after any opinion on
the subject. I had once before in private
assured Judge McDonald that all such
reports weie filsc I had hoped that was
sutlieient. What his purpose was in re
pealing it in the Convention I do not pre
tend to know. It is hurdlyto be presumed,
however, tha. it was a 'shafi at random
sent.'
The State Temperance Committee linger
upon the same falsehood with evident relish.
In their address to the people already al
lude 1 to they say 4but we will not use in
vective nor sit in judgment on the motives
of the Judges.' Not they. They only insin
uate that the Court yielded to the liquor in
fluence lor party purposes! Or to use their
own chaste and charitable language, 'the
Judges soiled the purity of the ermine of
justice for the paltry success of a party
through tho votes of the rumseller and his
satellites. Yet this grave charge, those
sapient gentlemen say, is not invective:
nor any imputation of the motives of the
Judges! Nor is it to be presumed that
they made the charge for any 'paltry party
purposes!' Not at all. Such holy men
as Fletcher, Blake & Company never act
on parti motives. They are too pure for
that. They even solemnly aver that they
'are not anxious for the success of any
parly!' And this they expect the people of
Indiana to believe. To thoso acquainted
with the history of thoso men, this profess
ion of faith must be highly amusing. Cre
dat Judeas Appella will be the general ap
preciation accorded to them by all who
know them.
That the Supreme Judges have not been
actuated by party motives in their judicial
career scarcely needs refutation. The liquor
law of 1 C53 was passed by a Democratic
Legislature. It was quite as much a Dem
ocratic measure as the law of 1 055 was a
Fusion measure. Aside from constitutional
objections, the two acts stand y marked
contrast to each other indicative of the
governing principles and policy of the two
parties. Yet this Democratic liquor law
was declared unconstitutional by a Demo
cratic Court. Do these immaculate pat
rons of temperance, some of whom fig
ured as high priests in the drunken or
gies of 10-10. do thoy think tho Judges so
decided for tho paltry success of the par
y? The school law was also a Democratic
measure. It was conceived in the Consti
tutional Convention of 105J, and matured
in tho Democratic Legislature of 1051-2.
Yet the Democratic Supreme Court declar
ed that act unconstitutional. Was that,,
too, for the paltry purposes of party suc
cess? And when the Same measure is
meted to the Fusion liquor Jaw of last win
ter, do these decorous gentlemen who
' ou!d not use ir.vceii?c nor sit in judgment
on the motives of the Court, pretend to say
that the decision was made for paltry par
ty purposes? For one I repel it as a base
falsehood.
These men seem to have no idea of any
high motive or imperative duty resting up
on the Court to protect the Constitution.
When the liquor law of 1853 was decided,
they and their congenial defame rs raised
the cry that the Court was opposed to tem
perance and morality. When the school
law was decided, the Court was opposed
to education! Now, when the Fusion li
quor law is subjected to the same test, the
Court has tarnished the ermine to obtain
party success! They cannot endure a
Court that will not sap and destroy the
Constitution ere the ink upon it is yet dry.
It is remarkable that in all this address
to the people, unctions with so much sanc
timonious" phraseology, the word Constitu
tion never once occurs in connection with
the liquor law of 1055. It is never once
intimated that the law Ayas considered un-
constitutional. There is not a word in if
to remind the people of the State that they
have any such instrument to protect their
rights. To read this address one might
suppose that its authors had not so mu'di
as heard whether there be anv Constitu
tion. At all events they evidently have no
relish for an instrument which prevents
such
'Burning aud shining lights to a the place,'
from lording it as they list over the heritage
of freemen. There is not even the slight
est intimation that the law might possibly
conflict with some constitutional provision.
All we learn is that this model enactment
had been arbitrarily declared void by the
Courts to subserve party ends. The peo
ple are further informed by these discreet
gentlemen, who are so scrupulous 'not to
use invective,' that 'the law would have
been fully sustained if all had been as anx
ious to do so, as to find fault therein.'
Men who thus charge corrup.ijn and
perjury (for that is the plain English of ir)
on those who are not infected with their
malady do they presume to appeal to the
people of Indiana and expect to be believed
when they disclaim political motives and
say they are not anxious for the success cf
any political party? Why, there is not a
man in Iud'anapolis of any party who will
not laugh in their faces when they pretend
such a thing. When were they ever any
thing but partizans bitter and vindictive
at that? Are they not now most of them,
perhaps all, Abolhionists of the most ultra
type, debasing the te
type, üejasing tue temperance cause as;
auxiliary and subservient to that Ihe
I 1 s
very game thy played so successfully in
1054 they are preparing to repeat in 1056.
The whole tenor of the address is that
what they call a 'good law' should be sus
tained anyhow. A rabid temperance man
said last summer that the law was doin-
a great deal of good and should be sustain
ed even if the Constitution had to be stretch
ed a little. That is true Fusion doctrine;
'stretch the Constitution' or 'let the Union
slide.' The hobby of the hour is paramount
to both in the Fusion mind.
In conclusion, sir, let me say that the ad
dress to tho people is a cowardly attack on
men whom judicial propriety renders pow
erless in defence.
The party opposed to ultra legislation,
and in favor of all proper legal restriction,
have champions in the field ready to dis
cuss the merits of the liquor law which
these gentlemen so emphatically endorse.
Why not manfully meet them? Oh, uo-
thoso prudent gent emeu think it safer to
make a dastardly assault on the Judges
whose hands they supposed to be tied.
Tho truth is, neither party can skulk be
hind the Supreme Court. A majority of
that Court are not agreed upon anything.
For instance, while I concur with one of
the Judges that tho manufacturing and agen
cy are unconstitutional, I expressly repudi
ate his reasoning in 6o man words. As to
the power of the Legislature to pass a fool
ish act, or the province of the Court tocor-
rectthat folly, we differ in toto celo. The
whole question of the expediency of the law
,. . ' .
is open for discussion, and must be met by
politicians on its merits. It is eminently
and obviously proper that such questions
? hould be settled by tho people. By their
power over tho Assembly, the Courts, and
even the Constitution itself, tho people are,
aid of right ought to be, the final arbiters
in the liquor question. There is no evad
ing it. No true Democrat will seek to
evade it. Throughout tho whole North
and North -West it has become almost a
national issue. By a preconcerted move
ment the Maine law is mounted as a hob
by by the same political party from Maine
to Iowa. It is p essed in spite of Con
stitutions and piivato rights. Vitupera
tion and falsehood are substituted for ar
gum mt. The State Temperance Commit
tee give tho key-note to their co-laborers.
Well may the true temperance sentiment of
the State pray to be delivered from such
menus.
An editor out West, boasts that he h.al
a talk -vih a woman, nd got the last word.
A Mountain Lake. Embosomed amid
the towering peaks and eternal snows of
the Siena Nevada, at an elevation of six
thousand feet above the level of the sea,
there is a great lake, which, strange to say,
does not freeze even the present severe win
t?r. This is probably owing to its depth,
and the constant motion of i:s waters; for; lhe 6'ofteilin? i!lfluW of cigar emoke.
it is often at the mouth of the small streams t Our Hoosier friend addressed him modest-
flowing into the lake that ice forms in any;
quantity
Tho Placerville American thus
speaks of it:
'A portion of the lake shore consists of
marshes or meadows; and the numbers of
trout, of all sizes, but many of them of
from two to two and a half f.et in length,
that are found in these marshes and shallow
waters, during thawy days and night3 of
winter and spring, are almost incredible.
Kelley & Rogers, residents of the valley
the present winter, are progressing finclj
in the construction of their twenty ton
yacht, and will have it completed by the
middle of May; but the tempting appear-
' ancc of the trout in the shallow waters, in
duccd them immediately to construct a
yawl of one and a half tons burthen, which
they have completed and launched; and
tho ease wih which the piscatory inhabit
ants of the lake arc taken, almost spoils the
sport. Next summer the valley will be
visited by hundreds."
A Great Hau.
George Lippard, in his new work called
"The Nazareue," thus speaks of President
Jackson: "He was a great man! Well 1
remember the day I waited upon him. He
sat there in his arm chair 1 can see thai
old warrior f ice wuh its snow-whi.e hair
even now. We told him of the public dis
tress the manufacturers rui iei the ea
gles shrouded in crape which were borne
at the head of twenty thousand men iuto
Independence Square. He heard us all
We begged him to leave the deposits where
they were, to uphold the great bank in
Philadelphia, biill he did not say a word.
At last one of the members mor tirey than
ti e rest, intimated that if the bank was
crushed a rebellion mij-ht follow. Then the
old man rose. I can sc?e him yet:
"Come!" he shouted in a voice of thun
der as his clutched hand was raised above
his whke hairs. "Come with bayonets in
your hands ins'.ead of petuions surround
the White House with your legions I am
ready for you all! Wkh the people at my
back, whom your gold can neither buy nor
awe, I will swing you up around the Cap
itoleach rebel of you on a gibbet high
as Hainan's."
"When I think," says the author, "of
that one man standing there at Washing
ton. battling wnh all the powers of hank
d j combined, betraved by those in
I A mm
whom he trusted, assailed by all that the
snake of malice could 1 iss or the fiend of
falsehood howl when I think of that one
man placing his back against the rock and
folding his arms for the blow, while he ut
tered his vow: "I will not swerve one inch
from the course I have chosen!" I must
confess that the records of Greece and
Borne nay, the proudest days of Crom
well or Napoleon cannot furnish an in
stance of a will like that of Andrew Jack
son, placed life and soul and fame on the
hazard of a die, for the people's welfaie.'
Providence Sentinel.
How to Cure a Fretting Child. One
of our little boys, from the interior of the
State, c?.me to us in an extremely unman
ageable condition. His mother said to me
that she could do nothing wich him; that
everything he wished for wero not granted
at once, ho would keep the house in a com
plete confusion; and that there was no qui
et except when ho was asleep; that ho was
never knowi to obey any one but his fa
ther, and then never except his command
was accompanied by a severe threat, Mr.
and Mrs. said they would bo glad to
leave their sou with us, if we thought we
could manage him. Whips and rods have
never been used as a means in bringing
our children to obedience; and we have no
notion of resorting to them now, the moth
er's recommenda.ion to the contrary not
withstanding. We met this little fellow
precisely as wc think every other child
should be met who has a similar disposi
tion. His crying, screaming and stamping
were of no avail. Whatever was proper
for hini was granted: what w as not proper
was withheld. By this mode tf treatment
for a day or two, he began to learn tho im-
Portant ,e660U that he was happier when
,ntf l,,.an fT -AT Va. IT
tleucss mingled with trmuess, we have
completely conquered him; so that now he
is kind, affectionate, orderly and obedient.
His unhappy, fretful disposition has given
way, and he exhibits a marked change in
bi character; not only in his outdoor snorts
but in school, where he will go througn the
severest drill with earnestness and delight.
-lteport of Philadelphia Asylum.
0'i -
A Goon One.- The following is from
Roger's Table-talk:
'Doctor Fordyce sometimes drank a good
deal at dinner. He was summoned one
evening to sco a lady pationt, when he was
more than half seas over, and consciou
that he was so. Feeling her pulee, and
finding himself unable to count its beats,
he mittlere J. 'Drunk by !' Next
morning, recollecting the circumstance,
he was gready vexed; and just as ho was
thinking what explana ion of his behaviot
he should offer to tho lady, a 1 'tter f.-om
her was put into his haul. 'She to- well
knew said the let er, 'that he h 1 1 discov
er I the unfortuinto condi ion in whici
she w is when he last vii e.I her an I she
entre.i cd him to keep the matter secret in
consi Jerati m of the enclosed (a hundred
pound bank note.)
NO. 23.
New Business. We heard a pretty good
one the other day, which we think merits a
wider circulation than it has yet got. The
story runs that some honest faced Hoosier
went iuto a fancy store in Cinci-nati, in
hunt of a sLuadon. The proprieter, or
head clerk was sitting in his counting room
wkIi Ins feet comfortably cocked up on a
ly as follows
i Uo you want to n:re a hanl about your
cstabluhn;en: sn i'
The clerk looked up induleiently, but
seeing hi cust,mej, concluded to have
somo fun out cf him, so he answered very
briskly, at the same time pulling out 3 new
and cosdy handkerchief, and bio wing, hi
on it. "
- Yes, sir, what kind of a situation do
you want?'
Well,' said the Hoosier, 'I'm not partic
ular, I'm ou: of work, and almost anything
'11 do me for a whiie.'
Yes; well, I can give a situation, if it
wid suit you.'
'What is i.? What's to- be done, sjiJ
what do you give,' enquired the other.-
Well,' was the answer, 1 want hands to
chaw rags into paper, and if you are will
ing to set in you mav begin a- once.'
'Good as wheal!' exclaimed th Hoosier,
'hand over rags.'
He c ' was the rejoinder, 'Like this
handl er -hief, and commence wi.h that
Hosier saw the 'sell,' aud quie Jy put
tiug the handkerchief into hi pocket, re
marked as he turned to go ou::
'When I get it chanced, ftranger I'll
fetch it lad !:
Short Sermon. My hearers: this h not
only a great but a mysterious world that
we live in and pay rent for. All discord
is harmony; all evil is good; all despotism
is liberiv, and ail wrong is right as Alex
ander Pope says: 'Whatever is, is right,
except the let, boot, and wanting to bor
row money. You may want sense and the
world r.-on't blame you tor i.. It would
gladly furnish you with the article, had it
aiyti spare, but uuluckily it has hard
ly enough for home consumption. How
ever, if you hvdc sense you are well enutf
otl'af.er all; for to commit a faux pas, as the
French say, you are !et go with the com
pliment, poor fool, he don't know any bet
ter. The truth is, a great deal of brains
is a great deal of hoLheration. An empty
skull is bound to shine in company be
cause the proprietor of ii isn't wit enough
to know lha. .here is a possibility of mak
ing a nincompoop air himself, and there
fore he dashes ahead, hit or miss, and gen
erally succeeds beyond conception. Let a
man be minus brai.uand plus bra3, and h
is as sure of a pass through the world as if
he was greased from ear to ankle; but rig
up for him a nice machinery of thought
and i s as much as he can do to attend to
it. He goes to the grave TnufBei and
troubled, curses life for its cares; aud mo
seys into eternity pack-saddled with men
tal misery. Oh! f jr the happiness of fools!
Kill or Cure. A doctor was employed
by a po r man to attend his wife who was
dangerously ill, the doctor gave him a hint
that lie had f..ars of not being paid.
'I have five pounds.' sai i the man t thd
doctor, 'and if you kill or cure, you shall
hue the money
The woman di.d on the doctor's hinds;
after a reasonable time he called for his
five pcundg.
The man asked the doctor if he killed
his wife?
No
Did you cure her?'
No
Thsn said the poor man, 'you have no
legal demand
And the man of physic went his way
sorely vexed.
i i -
One new bonnet will make a young la
dy feel happy.
One 'funny man will bother a whole
neighborhood.
One hiss will disturb a whole assembly.
One bad novel will waste reams of good
paper.
One iolly row will turn the inhabitants
out cf doors.
Ono pretty flirt will mike a dozen plaiti
girls unhappy for entire evenings.
One song "will set thirty people talking.
One dollar and a half will pay for tho
Democrat q'ac yar.
Post Office Kopuf-kt. Dining the
night of the 4th iiU the Post OmYc in
this place was forcibly entered and moucy
to the amount of 813J abstracted there
from. Tho money was in a small rd ih
trunk, which was also taken. It consisted
of about 810 in silrer change, on 810
bill on the Stale of Ohio, and about 85 i'.i
small bills, and the balance of gold
Tho P. M. offers a reward of 850 for
the apprehension of the thief and recov
ery of the mouey, or a liberal reward for
either. Huntington Herald:
Colic in Horses. The best remedy for
colic in horses is one pint of whiskey an2
two-thirds of a teacupful of gunpowder.
Mix well, and drench the horse, in ordi
nary cases, tho horeo will b well ia half-an-hour
provided the gunpowder don't
go off," aud tako the horse along with i.
; m
Truthful Sentiments. In this coun
try no young man nee I j;o unimploved.
Wealth and respectability are conditions
whieh ho may attain. He has no right t
b.? i lie; he has no light be ignorant; he has
no time to be viei tu, and generally speak
ing, no man has a light to be poor.
The Farmer. A Ixviu if.il thought thia
which we find in one of our exchanges:
If the. e is a mm who cm ea his btwj
i i peace wi h G.ri an 1 mn, it is th mm
who has b ouht that b:eal out of th
earth. I i ranker d by n f hu J, i is wet
by no tears, i, is stained by uo blood
-1 mt
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