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Marshall County independent. (Plymouth, Marshall County, Ind.) 1894-1895, March 08, 1895, Image 1

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Vol. I.
PLYMOUTH, MARSHALL COUNTY, INDIANA, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 185)5.
No. 21.
Pi IP Mi m m ii TP
Iii w Ei -vv s r i
HAT AND CAP
SALE
n
ma
THIS WEEK.
I have without doubt, now for sale,
the largest and grandest assortment of
Hats and Caps ever shown to the public.
05
IS
l
QUOTATIONS: Fine black .fur Stiff Hat
guaranteed, onlv 1.50; better, at 2.00; better at
2.25; better at2.50; better at $3.00.
HAT AT S3.50.
Latest Styles Fedoras.
SEE THEM.
Great Line of Caps,
25 CENTS AND UP.
Buy one I am selling the best.
Yours truly,
05
THE HATTER.
THE
Iff
UVJ
ONE YEAR FOR
(or
Have yon ever seen the MARSHALL
County Independent?
Have yon ever read it?
If not, this is yonr opportunity.
Until the 1st day of April, 1895, this un
precedented offer is for yon.
ONLY ONE DOLLAR.
We will also give with one year's sub
scription for the Independent.
uom s financial dcnooi. or
A Tale of Two Nations," for
postpaid to any address within the United
States.
Samples of the INDEPENDENT mailed on
application.
THE MOST RELIABLE SMOKE,
State Seal Cigar, 5 cts.
MANUFACTURED UY
C. W. CHAPMAN, - WARSAW, IND.
-AT-
1K)
9
Ml
JV
Ml
$1.15
Ji S
I3elie
DO
Observations.
AVhde there is no fault to find with
the proprietors of the hotels, or of me
service in Plymouth, yet it is a fact that
a tirst-class hotel is one of the needed
adjuncts to Plymouth. One of the fin
est locations to be found in any city is
lying idle on Michigan street, and would
no doubt prove a paying investment.
No city the size id Plymouth, can boast
of less facilities for caring for the trav
eling public. Our advancement de
mands it, and if those who have the
opportunity to reap this ripened har
vest, do not take advantage of it
they will discover when to late, that
someone with an e;e to business has
seen the opportunity. ami grasped it.
Yes, and while are plodding along
observing thetliiTeieiii mrtbohüirlitM-
lim eit v, e miuht lemarl- rejlit here.
I that we need an opera house, While we
liave in the past registered a kick i:t re
gard to the present "aiiJiioiium." we
believe these rebuke.; cannot come too
often. Next to a good hott !, built up.ii
a modern plan, comes an oj era house.
We. vears ago had a "centennial" exln-
bitionat Philadelphia, and it was in
stinctive and ni heneilt to t ! i f ho
had the pleasiue of attending it.
at this present day and age. the we rld's
fair, has caused the centennial, to be
come a back number.
Thus it is with the "Centennial" opera
house, of Plymouth. Can we not coax
or persuade those directly interested in
this opera house to remodel this eye sore
and receive the thanks and blessings of
an appreciative public. New scenery,
opera chairs, the walls daintily papered,
and ceilings frescoed, the wood work re
painted, and a good sweet toned piano
for the use of theatrical companies,
would be a blessing to the theatre going
people of Plymouth.
If it will be impossible to secure this
relief in our present opera house, would
it not be an excellent policy to form a
stock company and secure ground at
some point near the business portion of
our city and erect an opera house. It is
not essential to erect a large brick struc
ture, but a modest one story frame
building so constructed as to be utilized
as an entertainment hall of every de
scription. We know of several cities
where they formed stock companies for
this same purpose, and have proved
every time a winner. AVill some of our
hustling business men entertain this
idea and put it into operation.
Now we have also observed that the
idea of fixing up our city park, will soon
take a definite shape. This is surely a
good move. And why not? There is
not a place in the state of Indiana, where
a more picturesque, natural, location
can be found for a few hours of pleas
ure and recreation than our city park.
And such a flowing well. No other can
be found like it this side of the Rockies.
J5y all means let this oe attended to as
soon as spring opens.
"We are also aware of the natural ad
vantage our city has for the location of
manufacturing enterprises. AVe have
also observed that there are a great
number of these firms who are located
in large cities, where their expenses are
so high and with land rents so exhorbit
ant, that they are very anxious to locate
in some hustling, bustling city. AVe
want them, of course, but will we make
an effort? Now how is this:
AVantf.I) -Factory location near Chi
cago, emnloyes 100 hands and does a
business of i?'J(X),000 a year; state advan
tages and inducements.
Address P. O. box 513,
Cincinnatti, Ohio.
We just give this for our business
men's association. There are any num
ber of such opportunities that will prove
a great benefit to our city if secured, but
of course the effort must bo put forth.
AVe have noticed with gratification,
also, that those who reside on the south
side, and who for the past month have
been deprived of the use of city water,
have not up to date registered a very
great kick. So much for their kindly
spirit, Mut we are not at this time pre
pared to state how long this attitude of
meekness will continue. AVe are con
strained to remark, that those upon
whom the duty falls, should as soon as
practicable relieve the present condition
of a H airs.
In observing the signs of the times,
outside of the new democratic silver
party, the indications for a booming
spring trade in Plymouth is very appar
ent. The business depression of the
past winter has been bo marked, that
the least indication of a revival of busi
ness will bo taken advantage of and
pushed to a finish.
AVe are glad to observe a tendency on
the part of the city otlicers to remove
the taint caused bv houses of ill fame in
Plymouth. This is truly a commend
able undertakiiuT. and if nersisted in bv
0, i - - - - .
them until the whole disgraceful habi
tation is removed, they will deseive the!
thanks of rjl law abiding citizens, lint j
it should be continued until the entire!
representation of this class have been
removed outside of the city limits.
Pythian Home.
In last week's issue of the Walkerton
Independent, an article quoted from an
exchange, tells of an effort put forth by
Knights of Pythias m the state of Ar
kansas, to raise söikmkh tobe used to
erect a Pythian sani-arium at Hot
Springs, that state.
Within the past month 'numerous
movements have Keen entered into by
sem i Hö'ties t raise su'iicient money
to erect hiniesto ben.-ed by members
were in g:cd s'andii.g, and in neu!
of :iss';i!i(v. The only thing to he
feared in this connection is. th:;t so
man;- wiii be entered into that they will
ail in:!.
Some- weeks ag a few Knights of
Pytnias assembled together m Plym
outh, placed on foot a moveim tit, the
purp . -e of whirl i, was the establishment
ut!att!i:s place of a Pvlhian home, to be
j used as a refuge by knights in good
standing, and who were in need of med
ical a.-sistance, this help to be given
free. The home is to be a national one.
and thesame benefits bederived by those
win"- resided in other states as those
woald receive in the immediate vi
cinity. This movement while not un
der the supervision of the otlicers of the
order nor under their control, is in the
hands of knights who are enthusiastic
in the success of the venture from a hu
mane and Pythian standpoint.
The mode of securing this fund we
have given in the Ixdepexdknt on
previous occasions, and for fear this
might meet the eye of some one who
has rccieved a communication and not
thoroughly understand it, we will give
it again in detail:
A Mter was sent from Plymouth ait
dressed to one person. The one receiv
ing the same, being requested to write
three letters similar to the one received
to three different persons. The recipi
ent of the first letter then returns the
letter he received to Plymouth, Ind., en
closing one cent or more. The other
three letters each follow out the same
rule.
A casual glance at the above mode
would cause the matter to be considered
insigniticent. Mut if it receives prompt
attention, each one attending strictly to
the sending of his alloited list enough
money at &uch an insignificant small
sum, would return sufficient funds, not
only to erect a handsome structure, but,
leave a handsome surplus to conduct it
for years.
While this worthy effort has been
looked upon with suspicion by a great
many, no more worthier cause could be
assisted. Up to the present time, when
the project is only fairly launched, nearly
400 letters have been received and there
is not the slightest doubt, will meet with
hearty responses throughout the United
States. AVe might state, that the only
trouble so far encountered, is the care
lessness of knights who received these
letters and put off from time to time
sending them out, or returning the orig
inal. Responses have came in more
promptly from those who do not belong
to the order than from those who have
a knightly interest in the success of the
movement.
Jas. II. Mrink, who is one of the prime
movers in this undertaking is a worthy
knight and an honest citizen of our city.
The funds received are deposited at the
Plymouth State Mank, and under the
supervision ot O. (I. Soice, cashier of the
above named bank, and also a member
of Hyperion lodge of this city. AVe are
sorry to learn that those who neglect
their duty m this matter are those
knights in the immediate vicinity of
Plymouth, while those at a distance are
prompt in the matter. Let this good
work be pushed rapidly.
Still They Come.
It was but a few weeks ago when we
mentioned the forming of a new firm.
This week we can announce a new firm
which will soon enter into business in
Plymouth. The members of this firm
are S. II. Joseph and Michael Pyan, who
have purchased the stock of Peter Steg
man and will put m a large stock of
boots and shoes, and also a large stock
of gents furnishing goods.
These gentlemen are practical in this
line, Mr. Joseph having worked at this
kind of business in a number of places
throughout the state. Mr. Pyan has
had a number of years experience in
the same line, making the firm one of
prominence. As soon as they are pre
pared for their customers they will an
nounce it to the public. The Independ
ent wishes them unbounded success.
Commissioners Court.
Commissioners court commenced
Monday morning, and up to date have
transacted the following business: They
issued lirense to sell liquor to .larob C.
(Jarver, Piemen: Mixler and Kannise,
Argos; William P.abcork. La Paz; .John
W. Wolford, at PlymouthamlMarinont:
ami William Vanderweel. Purr uak.
William 1J. IJassett, of Indianapolis,
was given the contract for the Acker
bridge which is on the -Herman and
Poiu bon township lines.
The board advances s:;"o on the
Pletcher bridge i;i (ienn in township:
and Sliöii uii the .Johnsen biidue in Her
man township.
The viewers of the Mender road re
ported to the board. The a!!w i-t i .-7.".
for damages to David Hawk projeity
ami no damages, tov inni 1 II. Melbourn.
Henry uiiil-aiigh. o (in-cn P.h;.ip.
atlmlms! i at or 1'or t-.eesta-e ;'.lohn".
Plait, of West township, a-hed ioi the
remission of taxes v, :oi:gfu!!y a--essed
against said t state, lli nue-i wa-
grantt i!.
Trm ue K1". 1 I 'oik. m.nle a ! i t
of the poor el hi.; tov;.s::i; which was
a ; : !.
The pc;itioii for the Morris and li:ir
bridges, i" tVn.er towi.hij. were both
di:uisM d.
Predreick Duwful was appointed jus
tice of the peace, for (Ireeu township to
till the vacancy occasioned by the resig
nation of Daniel Mote.
Isaac Swihart was appointed consta
ble of Walnut township. to fill the place
made vacant by the resignation id' Sei
den Newhouse.
Petition to have Anthony Hoggs ap
pointed justice of the peace, of (Jreen
township, to take the place of David
Mote, resigned, was not granted.
Stephen Wiser was appointed consta
ble of Cireen township.
Allen Whaley was appointed consta
ble of Cireen township.
Mrs. .Julia K. Work, superintendent
of orphan's home made a report in con
nection with that institution. The re
port was approved.
Martin Dilley, trustee of Tippecanoe
township, made a report of the poor of
his tow nship. Peport was approved.
There was a petition for a road in
Center township. Levi Artz, Alfred
Cammerer and John Hawk were ap
pointed viewers.
Peport of the poor of Mourbon town
ship, by .James Miggs, trustee, was ap
proved. Janitor Kogel, of the court house,
made a report of wood bought and the
same was approved.
Martin A. Dilley and wife dedicated
and gave a quit claim deed to the
county for a road in Tippecanoe town
ship. Harcourt C. Corbin petitioned the
board to allow him pay for justice sta
tutes bought. The claim was dismissed.
County Clerk Snyder made a report
concerning acts of the grand jury which
was approved.
Trustee Porter, of Union township,
made a report concerning the poor of
his township which was approved.
Moard abjourned till Thursday morn
ing at 10 a. ni.
A New Railroad.
In last Saturday's Pecord, an article
regarding a new railroad to be built
from Sheldon, 111., through AVinamac
and Plymouth, to Toledo, Ohio, was
published. The venture is said to be in
the hands of capitalists of St. Louis and
Chicago. The purpose of tlds road will
be to get a direct route through to the
east, and contend against the Three I.
While this matter is really unofficial,
the movement on foot is assuming defi
nite shape, and should it prove satis
factory will be pushed. Peports have
it that a partial survey has been made
as far as AVinamac. If this proves au
thentic, Plymouth will haveanother rail
road, which will give hergreater prestige
as a railroad center, above any other city
in the state of Indiana. At AVinamac
mass meetings have been held to con
sider the matter and give encourage
ment to the venture.
A Pleasant Surprise.
Last Monday evening about 100 of W.
1). Thompson's friends, being aware
that it was his fisth birthday, concluded
to give a surprise party in honor of this
notable event. At 7 o'clock p. in. they
gathered together at the residence of A.
H. Underwood, and proceeded to the
residence of Mr. Thompson, where
without any resisdence from the host,
took possession. To prepair for any
emergency that might arise they took
with tliem a large number of chairs and
numerous baskets of eatables.
After the supper was ended, and pre
paring to leave the home where such
an enjoyable evening was spent, they
further expressed their good will and
respect by presenting Mr. Thompson
with a beautiful set of poems, and an
autograph album. The latter will r.o
doubt prove a valuable niomento to the
recipient, as each one w!io participated
m the joyous ocea-ion. had legistereu
their name upon its leaves.
It was a late hour when the guests
returned to their homs, carrying with
them happy hearts, owing to the pleas
ure derived In being able, in a small way,
to show- their appeeiation to one of
Plymouth's honored citizens.
sporting Column.
Mr. (Ico. (Irant ret u: rn-d t Plymouth
Wednesday. He o!!ei th following
ehallenge thror.li the I öl Ii: ; i:r to
run any of the windy foot larers. Here
is his challenge:
I will run I'miN-drum or his p.v.a
partner Jones or any of that combina
tion for .-'2"o a vide. The r.i-.-c to be as
1'oüoWS: I'loiJ! , of:! hlilefo 'S , Hilles,
a t raight S: . - t . . i ; b- iu a iay for
ohe Yt"k. or h'o;,": oj- a- ih .-rd b
t 'a m. ! l.uve !. p. -i!id : '1 :is a f .
!'. it with the T.ibnne -.-nth !V: d t
back i:iv ae; t e ; s.
I w ;l! a!,.. :u;. T. P.. Hart is.
Chicago, t!,,. rhampi' n heel
waü-.er. for .-'..o '. p;-o i hng ht
d' v nit !t
and toe
tut s u)
a forfeit at eli'ter Plym nth -r South
Pend. the i ace to be the same as men
tioned in his ehallenge j ubüshed in the
I.MU.PiiNl! NT. The race to take place
Thursday evening, March iv.:.
Now you newspaper foot racers either
put up your money or forever hold your
peace. (Ir.o. (Uuaxt, Plymouth, Ind.
During the fair next fall there will be
one of the greatest races ever seen in
this country. It w ill be the championship
for a long distance runner in America.
Arrangements are being perfected to
make this one of the greatest events in
the annals of foot racing, and is backed
by Plymouth enterprise.
Death cf Villiam Wyant.
Mr. AVyant an old resident of Plym
outh, died at his residence on Past La
PorU street last Saturday night, after a
long illness. Mr. Wyant was in his 71th
year, at the time of his death, and
leaves two daughters and one son. The
funeral services were held at his late
lesidence, Tuesday last at 10 o'clock a.
m. The remains being intered in Oak
Hill cemetery.
Inwood Items.
Mr. Curtis Perrv is on the sick list.
Uncle Stacy Murden is reported to be
no better.
Mr. John Oreer, Sr., was quite low
with lung fever, but is recovering.
Mr. AVilliam Moggs is moving in with
his grandmother, Mrs. Kachel Roberts.
Mr. Klias Murden has had a severe
attack of lung trouble, but is improv
ing. The protracted meeting at Inwood
closed Sunday night, with but littlo
success.
There will be a musical entertainment
at Robert's school house, Tuesday even
ing, March 5. A grand time is expected.
Some hustling farmers have opened
their sugar camps, but the last storm
has stopped the progress of the move
ment at present.
or.ni'AKY.
Friday, at 11 o'clock p. m., death en
tered the home of J. W. Perry and w ife,
of near Inwood, snatching from their
loving arms their youngest daughter,
Alice Pdna. She was born Dec. 11,
1SSS, and died Fei. -S, ly.C), aged ü
years, 2 months and 47 days. Her dis
ease was brain fever.
Dear Little Alice, it is better to have
loved and lost thee than never to have
known and felt thy sweet presence.
The bereaved parents have the sympa
thy of friends in their sad bereavement.
She was interred in the Salem cemetery.
Funeral services were conducted by the
Rev. Longbrake.
Another llo-Aor has f;ul'1.
Another pent h:i tlow n.
Another Iioum' N shaded,
Sint e Utile AlU-e is gone.
A mother's heart K broken.
A father's heart is crushed.
1, ean it he a token
That Alw-o's oiee is hnhel?
Oh. yes that little Voice is hushed.
sdfe eaimot spt-ak. sheeantn-t rise;
Her hody lies silent in the thist.
Her spirit i In the skies.
Oh. think not of the jcrave, mother;
' l is hut a house of flay.
Where we can slvp sweetly
I'nti! the resurrection day.
For Alice was a lovely child.
An idol from her birth;
Ih r disHsitiou so meek and mild.
You cau scarcely think of earth.
Hut. stp that falling tear, mother;
For tied hath thought it best
To tak? that precious little flower
To Ills eternal rest.
Then ween no more, dear friends;
Her outlet Iiirs are all o'er.
And w hen done with all below
We will meet her on that happy hore,"
-B.
. 1
A

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