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El heraldo de Brownsville. [volume] (Brownsville, Tex.) 1934-19??, August 06, 1935, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87056978/1935-08-06/ed-1/seq-6/

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The Woe*
At a Glance
Bj LESLIE EICHEL
Central Press Staff Writer
MEW YORK, Aug. 6.— Industrial
dates have a two-fold cause for Joy
this year. Not only has the summer
decline in dustry been much less
than had been anticipated, but
ctops have almost doubled last
year’s totals. That is, crops in in
dustrial states.
Tak Ohio, where Industry nas the
best autumn prospects in rive years.
Ohio’s wheat crop will run pproxi
mately 42.000 000 bushels. That is
CjOOO.001 bushels ahead of last vear.
It is 12.000.000 bushels ahead of the
last five-year average. Cash returns
will run $5,000,000 ahead of last
jw _
As AAA has restricted wheat pro
duction in the west, Ohio has re
turned to wheat cultivation. In 1935
Ohio has $8,000 more acres in wheat
than last year.
Ohio’s oats yield is 46.800.000
bushels this year against 28.000.000
last The corn yield is 111.708, 00
bushels against 92,000.000 last year.
And hay counts up 3,142.000 tons
against 2,000.000.
$ $ $
Is H Flctitoons?
But are earnings fictitious? Can
a pegged agricultural price remain?
It is here now not because of the
normal laws of supply and demand
but because of a subsidy and a tax
to pay the subsidy.
But agriculture will not give up
lu subsidy unless Industry gives up
Its—a high tariff.
All subsidies are paid by the peo
ple through some form of taxation
or in the prloe of products they buy.
Is France adopting a soldier eco
iH-mlc policy, by deflating all prices.
Including wages, food and rents?
The United States might, however,
object to the French policy of
deflation, for the government there
steps in to decree lower rents, lower
of commodities, as well as
prices
lower
Cotton Price
The price of cotton may swing the
south from It* traditional state’s
rights beliefs.
Southern members of congress
Still are strongly in favor of state's
rights, m this they now have been
joined by the conservative Republi
cans of the Industrial north.
But the Republicans may be left
hanging on a limb. The disaffection
Is likely to occur over cotton.
Suppose cotton were left to each
•tete? The price would drop like a
plummet. The federal government,
through the AAA. has carried oot
ton—to the anger of many north
ern industrialists.
And unless the federal ovem
raent continues to carry cotton at
‘prices wholly fictitious In compari
son with world prices the south's
economic system win crash.
Southern members of oomrees are
eager for preservation of property
rights, which formed the basis of
state’s rights, but they regret that
the AAA, became involved, through
legal contests, in the arguments
over the constitution.
• • •
Haey*s Threat
Nothing much is thought of Sen
star Huey Long’s threats to take
judicial action to determine whether
the federal government may go
a*-ead with PWA and other relief
projects in a state unless the state
ovemment has jurisdiction.
No state ever has turned down
. .bile works.
But Huey aims at something that
distrubs not only him but executives
of other states. The government not
only comes with relief but with
newer. Citizens begin looking to
Washington, rather to their
state capitals for relief and for de
cisions.
And they look toward federal
bureau chiefs rather than toward
congress.
* Thus the federalization of the
United States continues apace.
Yet not a single state could relieve
Its citizens. Not one has sufficient
ntcney or power. Hundreds of thou
sands of persons literally would
starve.
• • •
Coughlin
Discussions of political campaign
lsme6 are going on with an impor
tant factor overlooked.
Tne Rev. Charles EL Coughlin,
radio priest, is off the air this sum
mer. But he will be on the air
again this winter, and he will re
main on up to the presidential
ncmlnatng conventions In 1936.
RADIO PROGRAMS
TUESDAY, AUGUST • (Central and Eastern Standard Time)
Note: All program* to key and basic chain* or group* thereof unleu sped*
Sod; coast to coast (e to c) designation Includes all available stations.
Programs subject to change. P. M. (Daylight Hm om hour la tor)
NBCWEAF NETWORK
BASIC — East: weal wlw weel wtlc
wjar wtac wcab kyw whio wfbr wrc
wgy when wcae wtam wwj waai; mid:
.ad wmaq well who wow wdaf wkbf
NORTHWEST A CANADIAN - wtmj
wlba wstp webc wday kfyr crct del
SOUTH — wnra wptf wwnc wla wjax
wfla-waan wlod warn woe wab wapi
wjdx wamb kvoo wky wfaa wbap kpre
woal ktoa ktba wsoc wave wtar
MOUNTAIN—koa kdyi kgtr kfhl
PACIFIC — k(0 kli k«"W komo ktoq
I: fad ktar kgu kpo kez kga kyr kya
Cent. East.
I 3:00— 4:00— Pan-Americana Program
3:30— 4:30—Recital, Vocal Soloiet
3:40— 4:40 — Rhymes for Nursery—
eaat: Betty Marlowe Prog.—west
4.00— 6:00—Flying Time Adventure
' 4:10— 0:10—Weekly Hymnal Singing
4:30- 0:30—Press.Radio News Period
i 4:30— 0:30—Songs by Edith Warren
4:40— 0:40—Billy A Betty—weal only
0:00— 0:00—Amos 'n' Andy—oast only
0:10— 0:10—Hall and Grusn, Pianos
0:30— 0:30—Jackie Heller, Toner Solo
0:40— 0:40—You A Your Government
0:00— 7:00— Leo Reisman’s Orchestra
4:30— 7:30— Wayne King’s Serenade
7:00— 1:00—Ben Bernie and The Lads
7:30— 8:30— Eddie Duchin, Ore.—to c
0:00— 0:00—To Be Announced
0:00—10:00—Sammy Kaye’s Orches.—
eaat. Amos ’n’ An ay—west repeat
0:10—10:10—Harry Meyer’s Orchestra
0:30—10:30— Reisman Orch.—w. rpt.
0:40—10:40—The Hooflnghame. Sketch
10:00—11.-00— Ben Pollack’s Orchestra
10:30—11:30—Arlle Slmonds* Orchestra
CBS-WABC NETWORK
BASIC—East: wabe wade woko wcao
waab wnac war wkbw wkrc whk cklw
wdre wcau wjas wean wfbl wspd wjsv
wbns: Midwest: wbbm wfbm kmbe
kmox wowo whaa kfab
EAST—whp wbec wlbx wfea wore wlcc
rfrb ckac wlbx wmai
DIXIE—wgat wsfa wbre wqam wdod
klra wrec wlae wdsu wtoc krld wrr
ktrh ktaa waco koma wdbo wbt wdae
wblg wdbi wwva wmbg wsje wmbr
wata ktul kgko wcoa wdne wnox kwkh
MIDWEST—wgl wmt wmbd wlan wlbw
kfb wsmk wkbn wcoo wsbt ksej wnaz
woe
MOUNTAIN—kvor kls koh kal
COAST — khj koln kfre kol kfpy kvi
kfbk kmj kwg kern kdb kgmb kgb
Cent. EasL
3:30— 4:30—Jack Armstrong — east
only; Just Married—Dlx.; Vocal—w
3:40— 4:40—Boy Scout Program
4:00— 5:00 Buck Roger*—east; Sher
man Orchestra—west and Dixie
4:10— 5:15 — Careen Robison — east;
Nothing But Truth—weat A Dixie
I Cent. East.
[ 4:30— 6:30—Cosaack Choir — basic;
Cadet Quartet—west; Jack Arm
strong, Sketch—midwest repeat
4:46— 8:49—Cossack Choir, Continued
4:96— 9:99—Press-Radio News Period
6:00— 6:00—Just Entertainment—ea;
Orchestra—Dixie; Organ—west
6:19— 6:19—Virginia Vsrrill, Vocalist
6:30— 6:30—Sinoln' Sam — eaat: Suck
Regers—mtdw rpt: Melodies—west;
Mount and Qest, Pianos—Dixie
6:49— 6:49—Boake Cartel’s Comment
6:00— 7:00—Lavender A Old Lace
basic; Photona — Dixie; Harmon*
ettes—west
#:19— 7:19—The Old Timor — Dixie;
Edith Karen at Organ—west
6:30— 7:30—The Dramatio Interlude
7:00— 6:00—Lud Qluskin's Program
7:30- 6 30—Fred Waring’s Show—c-o
6:30— 6:30—Songs by Jerry Cooper
6:49— 6:48—Louis Prima A Orchestra
6:00—10:00 — Carl HofTs Orchestra
basic; Masters’ Orch.—midwest
6:30—10:30—Ted Fiorito’s Orchestra
10:00—11:00—Seattle Symphony Orch.
10:30—11:30—Leon Belisce'a Orchestra
11:30—12:30—Dance Music—west only
NBC-WJZ NETWORK
BASIC — East: wjx wbs-wbsa wbal
wham kdka wgar wjr wlw wsyr wmal
wfll; Mid: wcky wenr wis kwk kwer
koll wren wmaq kso wkhf
NORTHWEST A CANAOIAN — wtmj
wiba kstp webc wday kfyr crct cfcf
SOUTH — wrva wptf wwnc wis wjax
wfla-wsun wiod wsm wmc wsb wapi
wjdx wsmb kvoo wky wfaa wbap kpre
wool ktbs kths wsoc wave
MOUNTAIN—koa kdyl kgir krhl
PACIFIC—kgo kfi kgw.komo khq kfed
ktar kpo kex kga kgr kya
Cent. East.
3:30— 4:30—The Singing Lady—east •
3:49— 4:49—Orphan Annie—east only
4:00— 9:00—Thurn’s Bavarian Orch.
4:19— 6:19— Winnie the Pooh, Sketch
4:30— 6:30—Press* Radio News — ba
sic; The Singing Lady—mldw rpt
4:39— 6:39—Walter Csssel, Baritone
4:49— 5:49— Lowell Thomas — east;
Orphan Annie—repeat to midwest
6:00— 6:00—Dinner Concert Program
9:19— 6:19—Tony A Ous, Serial Skit
6:30— 6:30—Dot and Will, Dramatis
8:49— 6:49— Graham McNamee—wjs
6:00— 7:00—The Crime Clues Mystery
6:30— 7:30—’‘Welcome Valley” Serial
7:00— 6:00—N. T. O. A Chorus Girls
7:30— 6:30—Russian Symphonic Choir
7:49— 6:48—Goldman Band Concert
6:30— 6:30—Heart Throbs. Dramatic
6:0(9—10:00—Stanley High's Comment
6:19—10:16—Ramon Ramos Orch.—
east: Tony A Gus—west repeat
6:30—10:30—Dance Music Orchestra
10:00—11:00—Shandor and His Violin
10:09—11:06—Ranny Weeks Orchestra
10:30—11:30—Joe Rlnes A Orchestra
OUB BOARDING HOUSE
—By AHERN
WHEN ALVIN ANSWERED
THE 'DOORBELL,NO ONE
WAS THERE .AND HE ROUND
THAT PACKAGE, ADDRESSED
TO ME,ON THE STOOP/
STRANG E, ISNT IT 9
t PEAR nMATBE AN
INFERNAL MACHINE JO
DO ME HARM I^YVHAT
WOULD YOU SUGGEST-v
NOTIFY THE
POLICE ?
IT ISNT HEAVY
ENOUGH TO BE
A BOMB-'-MAY
vSUST BE A
LENGTH Of POPE,
WITH A NOTE TOR
YOU TO LOCP IT
ON YOUR NECK
AN1 DO ASWAN
DIVE PROM A
rafter!
IF YOU
DIDN'T HAVE
YOUR VEST
ON, Tt> SAY
IT WAS YOUR
VEST, BACK
FROM TH'
CLEANERS'
WITH A NOTE.
SAVING THEV
WONT ACCEPT
ITJ
be
SOME. OF
NOUR
"BEES,
MAJOR?
r<- mt T irr« Mavict wcr.it
£
—c. u.«. r«T on.
•U1 OUB WAT
WILLIAMS
( THERE, NOW/THET'S PROOP OF My
AR6VMIMT. tHET'S WHUT A TIED
ROPE DOES. SOU FALL OFF/ KETCH
VOCE FOOT IM TH' LOOP—ANJ' THERE
VOU APE/ TH' HCSS A»WT A fiOKJ'TO
STOP Till HE COMES TO A FEMCE.
WOW, WITH TH’ ROPE LOOPEOAROUSJD
i THE SADDLE HORW, you CAW UW
\ WIKJD IT ANJ'TuRW TH1 HOSS LOOSE—)
\ AW' VOU GOT A ROPE TO MESSE
\ KETCH VORE HOSS A6»wi/
\ KETCH YORE HOSS AQIKJ, /Tfc
:=3SJF VUH git WEAR ENJOUGH--^/Vflfc
WITH A TIED POPE, ^
>fcXJ KETCH SOMETH/M'
VOU CAIMT HA MOLE.
Them whut? whv,
you 60T TH' AWSWER
PlCjHT THERE —NOX
THET, BUT
•XR.'ai
•n-te ABSUMB4T WlMME%
<t- J
THE GUMPS — Somebody’s Mother
—By SIDNEY SMIT«
I
rMV POOR OARLIkK* MtUJE
SHE'S PROBABLY EAY1N6 HER
heart oirr wnn worry- i’ll
• NAME no LET HER KNOW THAT »M
ALL RI6HT- EVEN THOU6H IT WILL
RLL HER WITH SHAME WHEN SHE
RNOS OUT WHERE TM LlVIKKa -
AND I CAN'T WAIT TO SUE THE
LOOK ON THAT LAND-LALY';
| PACE when SHE PWDS
L WHO l REALLY ,-- t
| WONDER 1* \
MK»WT BORROW
A, LITTER TO MY
daughter.
HUMP*/
4,
VtS
MA&NT Eb
TO TELL YOU- BOY
PTB'mUfc-l AA\
THE MOTHER-^-LAM |
OF A. BULDONAiRE
ANb \NHILE HE LOLL*
IN LUXURY- |
STARVE IN
S. POVERTY
BETTER keep
AN EYE ON T>«
SILVERWARE, OlWL*
THAT OU> BAT
WHO JU»T AAOVED
IM \% AS CRAZY
: TV AS A BE&-BU6
»Pi
V(Nt 0€
I
I
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES — Down, Down, Down!
—By MARTIN
MAMY V.0AJ6,
MQNOTOlsXX>S
SVWCE
BOOTS TOOW.
OFT-BOY.
TWVS TVVAE..
wt \s
' MAKKU^S
QOVYB SOBS.
TVAwr wea
cooast \s
ttAOV^G
AWAY
TROW WOKS
mk^
__\-0ME£OME. VOTCHOOY
— OOGGC*iE. tSL _
I
TWKAG T6E£ VJWERE
woe —
0Bt-OOOT\FOL
bOT-fcOT TYV
0\C*tN«> WA \ GONNIk
LANJO ??VCKtsrrCOW=»T
MOCH Y.OMG’Efc
2
THE NEWFANGLES (Mom’ll Pop) — Don’t Fool With Him. Windy!
—By COWAN
YOU SURE PESTERED
SNtGGlNSJ ANY TIME YOU
WANTED TO GO FOR A
DRIVE, YOU ASKED HIM
VEAM.AND HE'S
TJJYIN' T OEMON5TTIAJE
HOW SMART UE IS. BY
TALWN ME INTO
BUYIN A CAR.FQB.
r
FOB •
TUATS SOME
OOGWMIiATlON
LIKE TUE tJRA
V
AINT
1 DOrvfT KNOW BUT HE'S
AN OLD SMOCTTMY. AND
IT SOUNDS TWCKY Tmc*
™c .
CwSELER '
fl* COIN DOWN
AN TELL THAT
BABY
PLENTYf
VOO WOULDN'T HAVE
ANY paOOE CHANCE
than a frog in a
DEN OF SNAKES/
«*Y, UE'UL HAKE VOO LOOK
CHEAPER THAN A BASEMENT
BAOGAIN IN A TEN CENT STORE.f
oo rp**i*
Tittirnuiuwa.me. ntwtuimt.on
J
ALLEY OOP — They Just Can’t Stay Friends
-By HAMLIN
YOU BUS' ME ON TH BEAK DON'T CASE IF
WHY, YOU HAIRY-FACED , YEB SIXTEEN KINGS '
UPSTART, DYA REALIZE ’ YOU MAKE A PASS AT
YEC TALKIN TKING ( OL DlNNV, AN I’LL
GUZZLE. MONARCH \ BUST >OU WIDE
OF ALL MOO/? ^ OPEN/
(thas th las stcaw-V
I'VE TOOK ALL TH/'-'YOURE \
POUGH STUFF /GONNA WHAT,
OFFN YOU I'M
GOIN TO -NOW
1M GONNA —
>OUA€ HAD THIS COM IN ID
>OU FOR A LONG TIME -
NOW YEC GONNA GIT IT, f~ I CAN
RIGHT WHERE ITLLDO A TAKE. IT
TH MOS GOOD/
m
-icr .o sc
-**>*«*
e, mt »»«»> awict. me. r. m. me. u. t. r*T. orr.
By CRANE
WASH TUBBS — It’s a Fish Story to Easy
O0OV/ AT LAST TWEY'RE &1T/N')
-- ~7 S t -
'WOTTASnaN6fnLT,£ Wi
TD THIS LCXj AN* OET EASY TO
HELP ME CARRY ‘Ef-1 BACK TO
CAMP.,-■
f!AT5 FUWKf/'
TH' LOG *VAS MERC / v
ONLY A MIUUTE /
EavtCt.WC T M. BEG. U 5 PAT. Off.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS — Danny Takes a Chance
—By BLOSSRB
/
I GOT FT ALL DOPED f
OUT'ASK THAT GUY f
TO COME ABOARD AMD <
SEE WHAT 5 WRONG -
WTW TVHS CRATE *f /
W
V
HE AMT
A POOL ?
HE KNOWS
PROVE TO HIM
THAT WERE WOT.'
< TOSS THE MACHINE
WE RE GUN O/ERBOARD.
ARMEOV J ^ W,M SEE
NEVER MIND THE RIDDLES !
£
1
OKAY, DANNY, V KEEP EM
TWEYVE TOSSED i0!>/EPEC>
TILL I DO
MAY BE
A GAG'ILL
USE TrtE
CANVAS
BOAT ?
A*AY TWEIP
QJNGO ABCAPD
AN SEE IF
TOU CAN NEIP
'EM -
mmmr
r v nee. u » ***
jtjt. >t»u 5t»»»cc
».- je
By WILLIAM RITT and JOE KINO
GABBY
GOSHf HERE I AM WOR.KTW
My EABS OFF IN A FACT RY
TE3STO PLA^^BASEBALLI
I'M ALL TUCKERED
OUT r GEE 1 THERE.
GOES THE QUITXIN'
WHISTLE! _
C I cain't
Pwait Till
i get My
UNIFORM
ON FOR
PRACTICE”
BET I LOOK
LIKE A REAL
8K* LEAGUER
-
ITS A TftlFlE
SMALL OLO
MAN BUT
ITS THE ONLY
PARE SUIT
ON
HAND
n
Ji
C—If
—By WILLIAM RITT and CLARENCE GRAY
BRICK BRADFORD
— On the Isle* Beyond tbe Ice
BRICKS
APPEARANCE
IN THE
SALISBURY
CAMP
SPEEDS
THE
PROFESSORS
PLANS TO
CONTINUE
MS SEARCH
FOR
THORKIliS
LAND.
YOU KNOW WHAT THEY
SAY ABOUT A BAD PENNY' ly
NOW I CAN CONTINUE OUR
HUNT FOR THE ISLES WITH
A LIGHT HEART/ i
NOW YOU ARE WITH
FRIENDS-WE SHALL
RETURN HOME'
HIU-I WILL NEVER
FORGET WHATYQU
DID FOR ME /
~y—
-AND NOW,SIR, WHEN DO
WE START FOR THORKIllS
LAND?
TOMORROW?

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