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The Leon reporter. (Leon, Iowa) 1887-1930, June 14, 1900, Image 1

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LEON REPORTER
«•©. E. HULL,Publl»her.
LEON,
Sntered
IOWA
OHO yflKTliiMMaa.tilia Utini nt.ifl'50
BU QKOntlMi.. '.•••' 4 76
"3?hree months......,....0.................... 40
at aeooiui oiotf
beon,Iova,Bo*totte«.
matter at the
California-will be thefirst of the states
toehold an ekctionthisyear. it is usual
ly republican, itsriiojority running oc
casionally as Irigb as
pretidentlai years.
14,000 or 15,000 in
William R.^Uearst, recently elected
president to the. national. association of
democratic clubs, puts Itthisway: "Tbe
great question vliieh wijl be decided at
the polls this year is whether this coun
try is to continue to be republic con
trolled by the people or pn empne con.
trolled by the trusts."
'the war cry two years ago was "Cuba
*lib|» j"-but no movement apparent to
tbe American iteople is being made by
^iithe republican administration to turn
&£Qujm over to the Cuban#. We hear of
no troubje over there except of our own
making. It seems- inconceivable that
our government should lend itself to a
Vr- scheme for ah indefinite military occupa
tion ofOuba, atleast unliiall the good
things have been taken in by the syn
•Js~ dicates.—St Paul Globe. %!,
Lon Boydson, publisher of the Monte
zuma Democrat, offers hit plaid for sale
on conditions. He will^sell th* plant
foi $760, full payment if Bryan is nom
inated and Elected, or $1500 if Bryan is
nominated and elecfed.—Albla
JC«CS.:
Jtot
Union
A gold democrat newspaper plant can
afioirdto be sold cheap at any time,
isproperty about on ft par With the
Q-i'J' famousMelodeon which Loii tried so
hard to. sell, while a jjre^dint of Leon.
At the recent anti-impcuipl Meeting in
New Ywkj^ disUngdlshed for its' great
earnestness, Geof^e 8. Boutwell broke
with the Mckinley administration and
with the republican party ifit rapport*
himin imperialistic policies,. a| it will.
He has bedn prominent infreesoil and
republican .politics for over'50 years, andi
in that tim&JuuH$«Bd goyernor of aas*
aenator 'in iqdaeq
•re Oefteral
Italian?
m^rican peopl
pire, and that
otliers. He
and mfiintaine the'president will pursue
"this policy until it is reyersed by the
iHypeople. "It is a vain hope," Governor
intwell declares, 'Hhat the republican
patty, as an. 6rgani«atioi», can reverse
the policy of the president. The hope
is as vain as-was the, hefpe in 1861-1866
that the democratic party, as an orgaA
ization, would aid in the abolition of
slavery." These are strong words from
a consistent party man and a founder oi
the republican party. Tens of thousnds
of that party "believe with bin?
COME INTO CAMP.
'Anyone has the right to call a nation
al convention and, if delegates respond
to the call, the convention may frame a
platform, nominate a ticket enter
upon a campaign. Votes, however, are
necessary to success. A convention
whicli does not represent a considerable
section of the voters would better not
Jie held.
The Gold democrats have issued a call
lotion on July 25. They have
ift perfect such a conven
vention, but it niustBe"»l8in to them,
as it is to everybody efee*. tfcey
are practically without supportei s. The
delegates who attend the convention
will constitute the whole voting strength
oftheir- party. Their ticket, if they
nominate one, will not be beard of on
election day.
But that is not all. Thpre is nothing
in the situation which calls for tbe nom
ination of a ticket by the gold demo
crats.. The designation ''gold" demo
crat is- this year -without significance,
the currency question is not
this year an issue. Four, eight or
twelve y^irs hence there may be a re
crudescence of this question. For the
present it is not debatable,
In calling a convention and nominat
ing a ticket, therefore," the gold demo
crats wonld bt entering upon a combat
very likd tbat of Don Quixote with the
windmills Tbey would be fighting an
iuiaipnary foe. By aligning themselves
withtbe national democracy they will
be fighting a real foe—the foe of true
democracy, bf constitutional principles
ind of all the traditions handed .down
bythe fathers of the republic, ^fl
it is a time for democrats to get to
[tWr. They never have bad a better
portunity to meet the enemy upon
brable ground. JS^penicy io-day
Kda for every principte'lhat ie cher
lwi,by loyers of republican institu
fons." Its opponent stand* for "every
jbing that is.odious, politically and
onomicaUy.^ In jinacb 'a: epiitest^ there
QO'room for third party. There are
twi) sides.
he gold democrats should get into
!e. They are needed, and they will
Welcome ft the Jeffe^scniKn: camp..
'They cannQt afiord toat^oot in tbe air.
--Ohicagp CBroni$i«^
Assouivciy^vRc
Makes the food more delicious and wholesome
WHAT THEY SAID OF TARIFF.
Here are some republican opinions on
tariff trusts complied by the New En
gland Free Trade League.
Governor Mount, of Indiatia Decern
ber, 1899, speaking to the Indiana hotel
keepers: "I emphatically favor remov
ing all tariff protection from every in
dustry that belongs to a combination
formed in restraint of trade."
Chicago Times-Herald, March, 1899:
"Most certainly it should be the duty of
congress, in both branches of which the
republicans have a majority, to abolish
or suspend the protective duty on the
products of any industry which has
been organized into a trust and which
has arbitrarily raised tbe prices of such
products."
Hon. John Sherman in United States
senate, October 15th, 1899: "When
ever this free competition is evaded or
avoided by combination of individuals
or corporations, the duty should be re
duced and foreign competition properly
invited." :-rV
8t. Paul Pioneer Press, April, 1900:
"The whole list of protected monopo
lies ought to be brought within the pur
view of a tariff reform which would en
able foreign competition to put a limit
on their ability to raise prices."
Ex-Senator Washburn, of Minnesota,
•aid in an interview in the New York
Tribune of September 11, 1899: "The
republican party, whether justly or. un
justly. is associated with trusts in the
minds of tbe masses. As a party we
have reached a crisis where we have got
t.i call a half. The republican party
has got to disconnect itself froai trusty
It has got to do something more than
adopt platform planks against trusts.
It wetas'jto me, after giving the Matter,
a grist deal'ofthooqght, that the repub*
licans in congress will: haye to examiner
the subjectohoroughly, awi wto.i|eve*
a trustisdependioc for it»
fluaa it will be tbe dttty jf.'ijjp
co&PBwmen and senators to (ubo^b
now fr«*ofS^Ptbe dtftles at once. We cannot stop
ifjftfo* em-1 short of that. The duties must be re
it must supersede all pealed when it is shown that the trusts
holds the president res-1 are betiefiting by them. This should be
posrittle for the bloody and destructive done with the duty on steel rails and on
consequences of our Philippine seizure, the tin plate."
Minneapolis Journal, October 2, 1899.
Tbe senator is so eminently correct in
his position that tariff duties which en
able trusts or any other kind of monop
olies to raise prices above the point at
which tbey could otherwise be main
tained should be lowered in the public
interest, that we must range ourselves
beside him on that proposition."
New York Commercial Advertiser, in
thefall of 1899: "The time will soon
come when public opinion will no more
tolerate protective duties on trust pro
ducts, for ^protection should logically
promote home competition, while trust
organization destroys it."
Portland OregOnian, March 1900: "Be
cause the paper trust has put up the
price of printing paper to unconscion
able figures, Representative DeVries, of
California, has introduced a bill to re'
peal the duty on printing paper and
tbe material of which it is made. It is
very well but there are about 40 more
big trusts that have help through pro
tective tariff, and should be dealt with
in the same way."
Senator Plumb, of Kansas, opposing
the McKinley tariff. August 26, 1891:
"There are dozens of lines of manufact
ures covered by the terms of this bill
which are controlled by trusts. I do
not know of any better way to start in
at least to reduce the exactions of trusts
than to cut down the shelter behind
which trusts are created."
Philadelphia Ledger, February, 1899:
"What is imperatively required is a re
yiBion of the tariff such as will modify
the subject of domestic monopoly."
The Republican Club of Harvard Uni
versity, on Wednesday, May 16, 1900,
Rockford Republic, (111.), January 29,
1900: "At a meeting a few. days ago at
Denver, the Colorado Editorial Associa
tion adopted resolutions demanding, the
repeal of tbe tariff on wood'pulp and all
oth^r materials entering into the man.
never stop* bedme the weather
bwann.
Then whyatoptakkij
sootts mmuumoH
cimply because ifa wmmer?
Kttp taking M. Hwffl heal your
tun^. and make them ifaonj tot
anoflitf.-tiiyMcr.
Baking
POWDER
ufacfure of print paper. There are many
other trusts entrenched securely behind
tariff duties which 9hut out foreign com
petition and enable American monopo
lists to rob consumers. There should
be a sweeping repeal of piotection which*
is made the opportunity for such mer
ciless exactions as the print paper trust
has laid on the newspapers of the Unit
ed States."
Hartford Courant, December 1899.
This paper declared that the president
should have closed his trust discussion
in his message, "with a straight-from
the-shoulder recommendation fbr |the
immediate repeal of any and every pro
tective customs duty behind which a
price-raising monopoly is squatted.'
Dubuque Times, (Iowa), January 20,
1900: "The paper trust is making hay
while the sun shines. xhe
simple remedy lies in the repeal of th?
tariff used to suppress competition and
to rob the publishers and through them
the public. Congress should lose no
time in wiping it off the statute books
and should not stop until every other
duty which operates to suppress com
petition or enhance the value of the
bounties of nature in private hands
repealed."
Tfiie-'woman qtufction, whi
been touohiad ahd evaded by previous
general conferences, oime to a vote in
the adoption of the new constitution,
Which, if ratified by three-fourths of all
the members of the annual conferences,
will become the organic law of the
church. The political question came up
in a section of tbe report of the com
mittee on temperance censuring the
president. This section was stricken
out.
The amusement question provoked
one of the stormlest'debates of the ses*
sion. There has been in the church
membership a growing hostility to a par
agraph in the discipline, specifying
theater-going, dancing, card playing,
and attendance at circuses as peculiarly
sinful acts. At the twenty-second con
ference, which met in Cleveland in 1896,
a motion to revise the discipline and
omit this reference to amusements was
voted down without ceremony. But
the inclination of young persons to re
sent the supervision of ministers over
their amusements, and the growing res
tiyeness of parents under the possibili
ties of clerical censure, gave the move
ment for revision more strength in this
conference than ever before. The re'
cent conference fibally voted to lay on
the table tbe minority report of a com
mittee against any change in the dis
cipline. This leaves the question open.
TRAVELING MEN OPPOSE TRUSTS
Subject Considered by the National
Association In Session at
New Orleans,
S—h
New Orteans, La., May 23.—The busi
ness cpnV^nitotf»f the National Travel
ers' Prbtfcctlfe association opened at the
Ath6naeum todi»y. Delegates were pre
the rates, or better still, place upon the 18®nt ^om tj|ei|ty |6ur States. Illinois,
free list all foreign goods, whether raw I Louisiana,
material or finished pioduct, that are I Virginia asked for
adopted a platform approving various evil effect upon trade. Concerning trusts
mc^sures/atnong them the fallowing:
""^ublicfty of the affairs of trusts and
removal of all -duty on commodities
controlled by. trusts."
LEON. IOWA. THURSDAY. JUM1C 14. I0OO.
is
THE METHODIST CONFERENCE.
The twenty-third general conference
of the Methodist church, just adjourned,
settled the question of lay representa
tion, removed the time limit on pastor
ate which has been maintained for near
ly a century, decided to admit women
as lay delegates, and rejected a prohib
itionist proposition to bring politics in
to the ch'urclr Three of these questions,
as the Inter Ocean p^qt&.qut, had been
under/incuiaion for years 'in annual
well w- general conferBncet.xhe
lay delegate* elected provlslonall/were
admitfctfat tbe4rst sesrfonoftb^
icealmost without
mu£Uuut^»s~rauiuT
the two.
Tennessee and
additional delegates
owing to increased membership.
The report of the executive committee
was devoted: largely to trusts and their'
the report, which was. unanimously
adopted, saj^ in part:
The dark clouds of monopolies and
trusts still hover over us and since our
last conventiito many commercial trave
lers have lost their portion and to use
the language' of an authorized agent -o
trusts who has boasted in a New York
paper that 360,000 commercial traveleis
have been thrown out of employment by
the concentration ofmercantile and com
mercial industries in the trusts that
$3,000,000 daily is thus saved to tbe
trusts by the conseqent withholding of
advertising patronage from, country
newspapers—in other words, the trust"
in these two items alone save to them'
fKslves 96,000,000 daily, all of which is
withdrawn direct from the people^v^
••=H-«h====S=9-'
The talesj of suffering that .couie from
I India are enough to make tbe blood
loT all cfrijitsed Rations ran cold. The
I
monisy Enlgland Jias spent indestroyiog
I tbe
DiAch republic would, have fed all
I the t&rUagamlton
of «»fertunate India.
CHAPTER.
AN UNWRITTEN
Many sails of hope were spread on the
passing of the+Dingley tarifl. The bill
prssed into law But the sailing was not
as free as had been expected, and plenty
of snags were met in the current. The
six months from January to the end of
June were not? neglected by importers.
The importations of cloths from England
i^to New York during that time were, in
the higher grade of goods, $4,702,668, and
from all other countries, in round nam
hers, $1,200,000. In the lower-rated
goods, $2,477,120 were brought from ling
land, and $986,000 from all other coun
tries. The total imports for the whole
country in all clasps of cloths for these
six months were .$11,000,000, which is
$2,200,000 more-than the Imports of
the port of New York.
Still,.in order to ''fill the American
market with immense stocks," the Euro
pean centers of production, where goods
are not piled np in expectation, but are
produced only on bona fide orders,, were
entirely cleared'out of all available stock.
But these stocks, along with other sur
plus.importntion that had found slower
sale than anticipated, proved for a long
time a thorn in the flesh. Neither tbe
manufacturer nor the importer could
reap the expected fiuit. The prices of
American goods-get the pace. Up to last
spring, the prices.- of worsted and woollen
Were with few Shimon-lived spurts of im
provement barely above' the average of
prices of the spring of 1896. If the price
of wool Is considered it is doubtful
whether the net result was as advantage
ous. lmmenBexfUantities of raw wool as
had been 'imported by manufacturers
which they owned at free-trade prices.
But American wools used for mixing
with Botany, arid other southern wools
Were higher. American wool on the
oured basis had been worth only 28 to
10 cents it was now worth 37.50 cent?.
The foreign wools were not imported
by manufacturers only, but also by
speculators. The pressure soon came
from the holders of these wools. Banks
that had advanced on them asked for
the return of loans. The use of cotton
am! shoddy in the place of wool, as a
consequence of the existing high tarifls,
was not without its ea«jt.-Jacob Schoen
hof in Forum,.-'? ,1*
f«oe
Eighty per cent.|of the war tax is'on
the life necessities, thus directly burden
ing the poor people. Out of the entire
amount the poor are required to pay 60
per cent., while 30 per cent, is paid by
those in moderate circumstances and
only 10 per cent, is paid by those who
own and control 80 per cent, of the
wealth of the country.
Dain'and Acme bull rakes at
BOW8HER & BIDDISON'B.
The
Small California 1Qa
hams, pound
ip'-
Tl
I*
ft
tii
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
1VU
Fish-Same Price.
FAXTCV
California Evaporated 1 Qp
Peaches, pound
V'1- TTTWI 'F
California Evaporated Cp
tprunesvpound
ltt?r-r
LEON QUEENSWARE
ft V- X. 1
'Me 'Phone 59.' Opefa House Block.
YOUR BUSINESS.
All we ask
is to look at our
Rock Bottom Grocery Price.
ft 25c buy 1 gallon syrup
Of '5c buys 2 packages oat meal
ft 20c buys 1 dozen oranges
ft 25c buys 2 packages coffee
ft 10c buys I large size bottle ketchup
45c buys 1 pail white fish 1900 catch
ft I5c buys 1 pound fancy Rio coffee
ft 15c buys I glass berry bowl worth 25c
Your Produce Wanted.
ketpriWl.^
Butter, Eggs, Vegetables,
iti
OPERA HOUSE BLOCK.
Cannons Roar in Africa! 1
We intend to have a little "roaring" at home, so to start the thing off, we offer
Salt aiid Smoked Meat—Fish!
Breakfast Bacon 1Q1
pound
Heavy Fat Bacon
pound
8L
FLOUR. FLOXJR. FLOUR.
To close out what Flour we noiir have on hand, we will pffer.
Clark's Special QOf
Patent, sack
California Evaporated
Prunes, large, pound
California Raisins new
and line, pound
COBHeB 8TH AMD
Com« in and get our prices on goods and see the difference. We buy in large quan
ties fbr cash and give our customers*the benefit.
WE PAY CASH FOR BUTTER, EGGS AND POULTRtl
".. .]§§ and pay you just what we get for them in CASH or MEpCH ANDJ
Corn, Hay, Oats,Bran, Shorts, Chop, Millet and Cane/Secd,Wood.
REPORTER SERIES VOL. XXY. NO. 42
high?St
sit
8^C
TIMETABLE.
C. 0. it Q.
SOUTH NORTH
Passenger....5:53 a.m. Passenger 8:36p.m.
rcight 10:^0 a. m. Freight 8:00 p. ml
Passenger..
11:50 a.m. I Freight 4:30. p-«l.
Freight 11:80p.m. Passenger. ..8:40p. mil
K. ft W.
GOING NORTH.
Wednesday35
m,_Dally
Sunday
excePt
Sunday"3^1'
4-0:00
ft
a
mar"§
Sunday and
m-—^Passenger
Dally except
No. 17—7:00 a. m. Freight—stock express
Sunday only.
19—S:05 a. m,—Freight Stock express
Wednesday only.
GOING SODTH.
Sunday""
a
11,1—Passenger—Dally
ifwjDruggists.
except
P' m--Frei8bt-»r.!l^,.ex'oept'
No. 18—11:45 a. m.—Freight—Sunday only
,2"1)0 nts west and north.-Weet,. our
train,No.,l makes direct connection at. Osceola
'p.V over there at all, making this best con
nectlona for points in that territory.'
A. 8. TIIARP, Agent:
Trusses
Are either a blessing or an injury
according to construction and the
manner in which they are fitted.
If they are the kind
THAT
are constructed on scientific prlnci
cipies, that can be properly adjust
ed, that hold firmly without irrita
tion, they will 1
SAVE
suffering, and may save life. A
rightly constructed and fitted truss
should exert a pressure identical
with that of the band." Many who
luoBt of their
LIVES
have worn trusses have compli
men ted us on the high character of
our stc^k, and upon the carefulness
of our flitting. If you need a truss
we want to show you what|we can
W. E. MYERS & CO.
j. A.Harris&Bro?
Manufacturers ofand
leon
magnificent line of monu
*1? I m8Ht8r-^ne workmanship is unexcelled
and material used first-class.
We buy our stock in car load lots
direct from the quaries in the east,
thereby enabling us to make
than firms buying in small quantities
Our business is run strictly on a first
class basis and we
all our work to give perfect satisfaction.
J. A. HARRIS & BROS.
Fancy Streaked lOp
Bacon, Pound
Most Close Out
Clark Bros. Suc
cess, sack
Evaporated Apples
special price, pound
1
Mrttafr
80c
Laundry Soap severalOC^
brands, 10 bars
FYWF-IJ.

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