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The Leon reporter. (Leon, Iowa) 1887-1930, January 10, 1918, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057096/1918-01-10/ed-1/seq-10/

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Page TEN
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I
IS-
RANGING KUK MIGHT HAVE
TAKEN PLACE.
Two Pro-Germans Are Given a Heal
Scale at Hands of Loyal Citi
zens.
This city was the scene of much
excitement Wednesday afternoon and
evening. There has been several
persons who have been known to
have German sympathies for some
time and the murmuring became so
great that the County Council of
Defense called a meeting for Wed
nesday afternoon to Investigate the
cases or a portion of them.
The meeting was held in the Com
mercial Club rooms over the Jensen
& Wever clothing store. The Coun
cil voted the meeting to be an open
one and the house was well filled.
Fred Tennegkeit and Rev. Starck
were among those who were request
ed ify the Council of Defense to ap
pear for investigation.
«They made their aopearapce as
per request. Several witnesses
were examined in each case and con
siderable damaging evidence was
found against these parties. After
a full investigation had been made,
th£ crowd was requested by the
chairman, R. C. Spencer to vacate
the rooiii and give the council aii| op
portunity to weigh the evidence •and
they would be recalled and given a
chance to hear the decision.
Hi. Yackey, of Harlan, State
Agent, was present, ana after- dis
cussing the cases for some time, tlie
Council reopened the doors to the
public and" rendered the following
decision: Fred Tennegk&it is a
single man. He is reputed to be
worth possibly over forty thousand
dollars. He gave one dollar to the
Y. M. C. A. and two dollars to the
Red Cross/after he had been put
through the third degree. That is
the extent of his assisting Uncle
Sam in winning the war. He was
given his choice of purchasing
11.000 in Government Bonds or go
ing" to Council Bluffs with state
-Agent Yackey. He first refused to
buy the bond on the grounds that
he did not have the money. As he
left the hall with Mr. Yackey, a by
stander did his bit by delivering a
great blow under Tennegkeit chin,
which landed him flat. Tennegkeit
then decided that a Government
Bond was alright and made the
necessary arrangements to purchase
one. The Council gave Rev. Starck
three days in which to vacate trom
the county and never again to set
foot upon Audubon coufaty soil.
This he agreed to.
It was well known by the Coun
cil when the crowd heard their de
cision, that it would not meet with
—public approval, under the circum
stances. The Council were no bet
ter satisfied th'an were the peonle,
but" they had done all they felt they
could as a Council of Defense under
the existing circumstances.
Fred Tennegkeit went to the First
National Bank to get his bond, al
though it was long past banking
hours. When he came from the
bank building, accompanied by
Sheriff Wilson, the bystanders were
waiting for him. Tennegkeit had
been in the bank more than an hour
waiting for the crowd to 'leave.
Sheriff Wilson was finally called to
take him from the bank and to pro
tect him so far as possible from
bodily injury, When the sheriff
and Tennegkeit came from the bank,
the latter was immediately taken
^"front-the sheriff and a rope was plac
ed Ttbout his neck. He was dragged
about half a block to tne park. He
was badly exhausted and somewhat
hurt by that time and a doctor was
called After he was somewhat re
vived," he was given an opportunity
to give one thousand dollars to the
lied Cross. He signed his check for
the amount and was turned over to
"the sheriff. He had been pretty
roughly used. He was taken by Uie
deputy sheriff and others to his
farm and the house was searched
and several guns were confiscated
by the deputy sheriff. Another man
was appointed to drive his team
home. As soon as his team arrived
home, he took the team and depart
ed, and it is rurttored that he drove
to Omaha and departed for. Colo
rado. We have heard nothing of
him since.
This part, of the program happen
ed about seven o'clock. The crowd
then formed and about
one
hundred
and fifty men in automobiles pre
pared for emergencies departed for
the home of Rev. Starck in Lincoln
township. They surrounded the
house and demanded that the Rev
erend come out. He did, but it was
through a small' cellar window, and
he was not afejb until he was a
ah«rt distant™
afcay in the cornfield,
and he was making pretty good
^lime. Tlyee shots were hreji bcfoie
tlte- Reverend decided to stop. He
was then treated in a manner very
similar to one Tennegkei* exnenenc
ed, only that no demands were
made on him for Red Cross funds.
Even with a rope about Ms neck,
he stated: "Boys, you are only do
r«r your duty." We do not know
lust what he meant by that unless
»Tpsd?e entity to the charges pre
ferred against him. Mrs. Starck be
came-hysterical
and fell in a faint,
and through Sympathy for hei^-The
boys released Starck~to take care of
his wife They th6n scattered to.
their homes and did no real harm.
It is rumored that they will vjsit
certain
others in this town as well
as some in the country
The Advocate does not believe in
violence. We sincerely hope that In
future cases of this kind that the
best of Judgment will be used, in the
enforcement of loyalty. 'We believe
that the public has stood for about
nil the shootinsr in the back that it
Should be expected to stand for.
Our bovs are facing the Germans in
the trenches. T.pt* "5 see that none
of those in this comnv goes to shoot
ing them in the back, if there be
others besides tho~e of German ex
traction who attempt to do this, they
should be treated in the s?.m? man
ner, but let us d»-it by law. If no«
sible. But let us crush disloyalty
in some manner. Let us not just be
satisfied with no Kaiser talk, but
let us insist upon whooping it up
for Our Country.—lAudubon Advo
cate.
Fairview.
Mrs. George Lushbaugh and
daughter, Treva, spent Saturday
night and Sunday with her mother,
TMr« WiHiims. of Lineville.
•Miss Ada Phelps spent Jf few
d* Urt week at the Mrs. Albeit
Willis home.
Lee Snencer and family were Line
ville callers Saturday.
Laural Johnson and wife are vis
iting at the Jim Vaughn home.
Lovle Kentner and wife, H._ O
Bright and familv spent Sunday
the Rev. Willis home.
Mrs Willis Dillon/called on drs.
#. Peck one evening last week
Dlide Petty and wife spent Satur
day night and Sunday at the Tall
Williams home.
Dbn Moore and-wife spent one
evening last week* at the Ruthford
H°Harryr«Pheha
baa been huskin*
for O. L. feck.
ht*Mne Curry snent »aturday
Davis City.
Mrs. Harry Adams, from Pasa
dena, California, was in Davis City
last week visiting her many friends.
Mrs. A Radnich and Mrs. U.
G. Griffth were shopping in Des
Moines last week. ,,,
.The Apostolics are holding reviv
al meetings in the Union church.
Many evangelists are here and tne
result so far were ten baptisms Sun
day afternoon.
Miss Luciie Post, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. I. N. Post, is very serious
ly ill with the measles.
A community dinner was held in
the M. E. church last Saturday. A
great manv were there and there
was no "H'ooveraing."
Charles Rudibaugh continues very
ill at his home south of town.
Oscar .Tudd made a business trip
to Des Moines last Monday. Mr.
Judd will leave soon for Florida to
remain the rest of the winter.
Quite a number of patriotic cit
izens attended the Red Cross bail
in the K. of P. hall at Leon New
Year's night.
The young people had a piano
dance at the opera house last lues
day night alter the picture show.
Frank Cartwriglit, who has been
very ill at the home of his daugh
ter Mrs. J. W. Wailes, is now able
to 'be
011
the street aeain.
Mrs. .loel Hadley and children,
from Aurora, 111., were the guests ol
Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Grimes last week.
Mrs. Hadley was formerly Miss Anna
Shirley.
I Irtish College
Mrs David Hubbard visited last
week at John Hubbard's.
Mrs A. E Poole spent one day
ast week with her mother, Mrs.
Laura Hulinger.
M. L. Dale and A. F. Cozad help
ed David Hubbard one day last week.
Willis Hubbard spent Saturday
night and Sunday at Ralph Frost s.
George Minthorne ot Lamoni,
spent Wednesday night at John Hub
bard's*
Harry Cox helped M. L. Dale
saw wood Thursday.
John and Clarence Hubbard saw
ed wood,for M. L. Dale Thursday
and Friffay.
John Garner and son, Glenn saw
ed wood for Mike Griffin Thursday.
David Hubbard helped M. L.
Dale saw wood Thursday and Fri-
(lafoennis,
Grogan and Walter Daughton call
ed at Mike Griffin's Thursday.
John Hubbard spent one day last
week at George Minthorne near
Lamoni.
Ed and Russell Griffin were Leon
callers Monday afternoqn.
Miss Annie Hubbard assisted Mrs.
M. L. Dale with her house work
Thursday and Friday.
Mrs. Albert Baker an'1- son Lo
race spent Friday at M. L. Dale s.
John and Clarence Hubbard were
Leon callers one day last week.
EL J- Evans helped Zach McDaniel
butcher Monday.
Ilnrr Oak- Kidge.
Quite a snow the'first of the week,
About 7". of the Farmers' Alli
ance members assembled at. Eas'/
Eden school house^New Years eve.
and watched the old year out and
the new year in. Refreshments,
consisting of oysters, crackers, pick
les, celerv, apples and coffee, were
served 'An old fashioned spelling
match
between tile ladies' and nien,
the ladies winning in the contest.
Plenty of music and singing and a
general good time was had.
Little Lenis Broline had the mis
fortune to get a button in his nose
Saturday and is causing quite a lot
of anxiety.
Frances Chawtain visited Pleasant
View school Friday afternoon, her
brother, George being the teacher.
Roy Gill spent a few days last
week at Des Moines and Cambridge.
Mrs. Arthur Downey, of Indian
ola, is visiting her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Clarence Rumley's.
Mrs. Roy Gill called on Mrs. Will
Johnson Fridaywafternoon.
Jess Rumley,' a former Eden
Prairie boy, who has" been away for
nine years, was shaking hands with
old time friends once more.
Mrs Wilmuth Reynolds and
daughter. Jennie, of Topeka, Kans..
is here visiting her uncles, Wayne
and Harris Gammon, at^d other
relatives.
Lonesome Ridge.
Jesse Maynard and family spent
Saturday night at J. B. McDaniel s.
Mrs E A. Little spent the past
week with relatives in this vicinity.
Mrs. W. Z. McDaniel visited at E.
J. Evans' Friday.
Guy Garner, wife and baby re
turned to their home at Adel after
a two weeks visi* with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Garner.
Miss Marea Grogan resumed her
school duties at Charm Tuesday-aft
er several days visit with her par
ents, Mr. and Mrs. S.* J. Grogan,
near' Ellston.
Mrs E Evans spent Monday
and Tuesday with her daughter, Mrs.
W. Z. McDaniel.
Auction Sale at Craig's grocery
store Monday. January 14th.
T. H. Schenck, Trustee.
In many sections of Hungary chil
dren are not able to attend school,
owing to the lack of shoes.
Get that Mackinaw now of G. B.
Price.
WAR
It Has No Top Cm.-.
You serve yourself and
your country well when
I you bake a War Pie, and
for goodness use
NONE SUCH
-MINCEMEAT
"like Mother Used to Make"
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Michael, John and John L.
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THE LEON REPORTER, THURSDAY, JANUARY 10,1918
"65c to 85c WOOLEN DRESS GOODS
Colors are black, navy and red. Wool
mixed suitings, 36 inches wide. Will
sell during tlie remnant sale at
85c to $1.09 WOOL DRESS GOODS
Splendid foT skirts and" dresses. Col
ors are brown, gray, blue, and black.
36 tp 45 inches wide. Very special
4-buckle Ball Band cloth
"upper at $2.45
4-buckle Ball Band all
rubber at ..... $2.95
1-buckle Ball Band, all
rubber, at $1.95
Boys' 4-buckle Ball
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flour, labor, short-
OSVc ening,and expense.
Also try a NONE SUCH Mince
Pie-with whole wheat or rye
iloiflr crust. It is very healthful.
Use NONE SUCH i_
Mince Meat for
regular mince
pies/ calces,
•fi.uldings,
a,*d
rookies.
Band, cloth upper
at
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The Fur Sale
Come to. Hurst's, seleet the fur,
muff, set, or neck piece and just
deduct ONE THIRD
the former price then you have the
bargain.
Furs for Women and
Children
Women! Just Think!
Do you need a coat or suit for dress wear? Then
come to Hursts and take your choice at half the former
price.
Or do you need a coat for rough wear? Then choose
a cheap co&t. For as low as $2.73 you can buy a woman's
servicable coaL Qoats at $3.75, $5.25, $6.85, $7.50, $9.50
up to $17.50.
I
Now See If You Don't Need
a New Coat or Suit
Then come to Hurst's—we will not carry them over
for another season.
Come On,
BALL BAND overshoes
are cheaper at Hursts, not
all' sizes left, but you might
find your si^e.
$2.15
Boys' 1-buckle Ball
Band, all rubber
at ...,....$1.35
Ball Band rubber boots,
here at $3.65
Many odd lots of
men's, boys' and child
ren's rubber footwear
at bargain prices.
I
Men's Underwear Cheap
Odd lot of men's wool
underwear, in most all
sizes. In shirts 34 to 46.
$1.50 quality at 75c, 75c
iicv'tiflt bliirts at'
38c, plenty 44 and 46
spvi.e smaller—choice at
?33} wool ribbed," regular
$1 Quality, light brown
t»i]©!V otilv at 50c each.
You Men!
%in
Every Day Is-Bargain Day at Hurst's Big January Sales!
Commencing Friday Morning, January 11—Hurst's
Big January
Remnant Sale!
Don't miss this sale—come Friday—come every day—bargains in all tines.
47c
YARD
YARD
You Can Choose Any Coat or Suit at Just Half Price
ISS
Italy On ftofe&ir
lytwear
\7hea yen buy "Ball-Band"
Footwear you buy bo many
days
of
dry,
•V'V
warm feet. "Ball-Band"
gives more days' wear
other kinds.
It makes satisfied cu#»
tomera—that's why
we recommcnd
$5.00 Gossarcls •*.
V.
$3.5(T Gossards
Price is a Great Mover
Remnants—all over the store—and remnant sale this
year means all lines are affected—piece goods, ready-to
wear, all broken lines, odd lots, one, two and three of^ a
kind, etc.
We make the price so powerful by big reductions
that you will come for many miles and through cold
weather to save. Be sure to come.
I
Remnants of
Wash Dress Goods Silks Hose
Embroideries Satins Notions
Cretonnes Laces Caps
Draperies" Ivory Collars
Curtain Nets Satteens Waists
White Goods Corsets Blankets
Night Gowns Coats Suits
Rain Coats Furs Towels
and a hundred other bargains.
The Gossard
Corset Sale
The Gossard sale means much
to you women. It. means a big sav-,
ing—it means more comfort to
wear a Gossard.
Many women came and were
fitted last week. YOU come and
be fitted for the sale lasts until
January 18th.
$8.50 Gossards
$0.50 Gossards .«
$2:50' Gossards 1.87
$2.00 Gossards 1-50
25c
will buy children's gray
cotton shirts or drawers
—ages 2 to 14 years.
33c
will buy children's all
wool shirts or drawers,
worth today 65c, but we
haven't all sizes, so they
go in the remnant sale.
For
98c
you can buy a good ging
ham house -dress, neatly
made and a regular_$1.25
quality, but-not all 'sizesv
so in the remnant sale
they go.
For
$1
are these cotton fibbed
union suits, long or short
sleeve, ankle lengths or
low neck and sleeveless.
All sizes.'
ii
3.50
or,
And at 29c
you can choose from five
pretty patterns of curtain
nets, that sold fffr 35c to
45c per yard.
At 18c
the yard you can buy
pretty 36 inch silkalines
or regular 25c gingham
both light and dark
colors. The bolt has been
cut, so in this sale they
go.
For $1
we sell you a splendid
outing night dress, sizes
34 to 46. These are migh
ty cheap.
Only $1.95
7M
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Are these silk and- wool $
union suits for wnqten— jj
regular $3.00 to? U.50 $
"roods. Tmt not all sizes.

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