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The Leon reporter. (Leon, Iowa) 1887-1930, April 11, 1918, Image 4

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Page FOUR
MASONIC DIRECTORY.
8BAND RIVER LODGE No. 7*
A. F. & A. M.
MMU regularly lBt Tuesday in eacl
••nth. Transient brethren cordial)
tarlted.
0, R. Conrey, W. R.
Sec.
-m.
M-
Mo°fe»..
w-
HON CHAPTER No. 33, R. A.
Meets regularly 2nd Wednesday
{j nch month. Transient brethrei
•ordially invited.
Trancis Varga, W. A. Poush,
Sec. H.
TRIPOLIS COMMANDERY No.
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
Meets reguarly 3rd Thursday eack
•tenth. Transient Knights cordiallj
Invited.
W. A. Poush, H. Farquhar.
Recorder. B.
LEON CHAPTER No. 3552 O. E. 8.
Meets regularly 2nd Monday eack
menth. Visiting members cordially
iirited.
Mrs. Mary Foxworthy, W.
Mr*. Marion Woodard, Sec.
DR. W. R. WEST
Dental Surgeon.
Office in Biggs Block.
Leon, Iowa.
J. W. ROWELL
Dentist
111 work dene flrst-class and guar*
anted. Office in Long block.
P. F. BRADLEY, OPTICIAN.
Office at Dr. Wood
mansee's residence
Will be In Leon oi
Saturday and Mon
day of each week.
Residence two tocks '^uth of th*
Christian church, Leon, Iowa.
W. F. WAIGHT
Physician and Surgeon.
Special study and attention given to
the treatment of chronic diseases.
Oflce over Kopp's Drug Store. 3 2- 18
i. E. BRITTAN, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Decatur City, Iowa.
Call! answered nromptly night or la)
V. R. McGINNIi
Lawyer
la Ray Block
MMMMMMMWMMflflMMMWM
Make Dates with
DR HAVELY
Kellerton, Iowa,
for Dental Work.
MMMMMMUMIMMMIMIMIS
F. S. STEWART
Licensed Undertaker
Iowa License No. 48.
CADILLAC AUTO HEARSE
Experienced Chaffeur
LEON. IOWA
Harley Webb ij
I Live Stock and Real
{Estate Auctioneer
Charges: 1 per cent.
Phone 271 Leon, Iowa
I gu^ antee my work.
DR. S. C. VARNUM
Graduate Veterinarian
Pftie 87jr Rexall Drug Store'
LEON, IOWA
E. 0. WILLS
Auctioneer
Van Wertf Iowa
Will give special atten
tion to your sale. 1 guar
antee satisfaction. For
terms and dates address
me at Van Wert, Iowa.
CHIfflESTER^Ll^
jrSSK UMctl Aikr«rnnMtif
botes, sealed wttfc Blua Rw**- W
•Sam MAMS raiAferM
jK«
CHE LEON REPORTER
O. F. HULL, Editor.
I«w«
[m PRESS
^SOOAflf
Subscription Rates.
One year ?2.00
Six months l.Jjw
Three months .-««
Canadian and foreign countries,
$2.50 per year.
Entered as second class matter at
the Leon, Iowa, Postoffice.
Advertising Rates.
Display Advertising, special sfec
rice, per inch l|c
Reading notices, per Jine oc
3ards of Tliauks, cash with
copy 50c
Resolutions of Respect |1.00
Church,
school and society no
tices, where admission or en
tertainment fee is charged
per line oc
We are glad to publish any and
»U church or society notices, but
please don't confound news notices
with advertising locals. Correspon
dents are cautioned not to include
said notices with their items unless
they are authorized and paid for, and
If possible remittance for same
should accompany the notice.
"Our Country! In her intercourse
with foreign nations may she always
be in the right But Our Country,
right or wrong."—Stephen Decatur.
FIGHT:
Every pacifist is an enemy. Ev
ery one who stands for a negotiated
peace is giving aid and comfort to
our foes.
A peace that would leave unsettled
the vital issues of the war would
only be an armistice.
Witliing two decades the world
woulld be plunged into a still blood
ier war, and our children would be
driven to finish the struggle for free
dom which, in our cowardice, we
left incomplete.
Woe to England, France and
America if they leave such a legacy
to the next generation!
Already'we have talked too much
peace. The frequency of our peace
definitions Berlin and Vienna inter
pret as signs of weakness.
Among the armies at the front
there are no illusions. Soldiers
know but one way to win. The al
lied armies in France know they
can make Germany taste the bitter
ness of defeat.
If presidents and premiers had
less to say about peace the end
would sooner be in sight.
Germany and Austria are whip
ped to their knees. All the world
knows it. The Teuton military
lords know it, but by a gigantic
bluff they hope to discourage the
enemy.
The more we talk about peace,
the more we play their game.
Famine and economic ruin stare the
central powers in the face. Their
armies may $till be fed, but even a
Hindenburg can not maintain in
definitely a strong fighting army
with a home background of under
fed or starving wives and children.
If we quit now "all the dead," as
former Attorney General James M.
Beck' says, "will have died in vain.
A negotiated peace will mean the
end of all a liberal civilization holds
dear.
"Nothing we may have to endure
now," says Rudyard Kipling, "will
weigh one featherweight compared
what we shall most certainly have
to suffer if for any cause we fail of
victory."'
The most dangerous feature of
the war situation is not submarine
ruthlessness or tne lack of tonnage,
but the persistent discussion of
Peace.
We must end the war by fighting
not by peace addresses. Thus only
can we secure a peace worthy the
name.—Leslie's Weekly.
RATIONING.
Why are we afraid to speak the
word "rationing?" In the next few
months, the food administration tells
us, we must cut our bread consump
tion in half. Will all of us cut our
bread consumption in half? By no
means. The patriots will, but the
others will not. So long as we have
no compulsory system of distribut
ing the burden, such as rationing
provides, those who are well-to-do
and think of tHeir stomachs before
their country will be served as usual,
and the sacrifice will fall elsewhere.
The food administrator oronoses to
ship to the allies the quantity of
wheat that they need and trusts to
voluntary methods on our part to
bring us safely through to the next
harvest upon half our normal sup
plies. He may have to speak up and
say the word "rationing" and re
quest that congress empower him. to
ration the population. The Ameri
can people will back this purpose
and foresight if he does. A country
which without a murmur accepts
conscription, instead of the volun
teer system, to fight our. military
battles, will accept conscription,
rationing, instead of any volunteer
system, to fight our battles against
famine.
A PIjEIXJE.
"I am an American. I love my
country and put unshakable faith in
her character and in her mission.
Therefore, I pledge with all my pow
ers to a maintenance of her historic
ideals and to a fulfillment of her
mission as God's apostle of Chris
tian democracy to mankind. I shall
seek to discourage all disparagement
of America and to promote every
form of intelligent national loyalty
and patriotism. Whatever I can do
to increase love and reverence for
my country and her flag, I shall
freely and fearlessly and joyously
do. Above all partisanship and self
interest I solemnly place my coun
try, promising to pay for America,
to support America and to honor
America by my character and my
works. This pledge I make in hum
ble dependence on the God of m*
fathers whose favor alone. has
made our country great."
Demolishing a Paris church by
long range gunfire on Good Friday
and killing seventy-fire people at
service is Germany's raostatrikmg
example to date of its veneration tor
the God of the Kaiser's prayer*.
THE LEON REPORTER, THURSDAY, APRIL 11,1918.
THE DUTY OF AMERICA.
President Wilson did not advise
in
his war message, nor did congress
act in declaring a state of war be
tween ihe United States and Ger
many, without giving the most sol
emn consideration to what the action
meant. They knew it meant the
death of thousands of brave
Ameri­
cans they knew it meant suffering
and. wounds and the disabling for
life of hundreds of thousands of
our young men. They counted to
the full the human cost and the ma
terial cost.
Every development since has just
ified the wisdom and proved the im
perative necessity of America's .tnr
ticipation. Every German success
and every German failure have
shown how necessary to our own
welfare and peace, how necessary to
the safety and peace of the world,
the defeat of Germany is. Every
loot of ground Germany has been
forced to give" up, every foot of land
she has seized, have demonstrated
the imperative necessity of defeat
ing that sinister, intolerable thing
called Germanism.
Germanism is 3,000 miles away.
It must never come any nearer. Let
this war result in anything but the
defeat of Germany, let her emerge
with her power unbroken and her
kultur still dominant, and it is but
a question of time until we alone
shall be fighting Germanv instead of
warring against her with our Allies
on our side.
Lincoln .said that this country
could not exist hall' slave and half
free. All Americans now recognize
that truth. The events of the last
few years have shown equally clear
lv that this world can not exist half
free and half autocratic—half free
people loving liberty and justice and
peace, and half an autocracy seek
ing to dominate the world, caring
nothing for liberty or stice and
nothing for humanity and civiliza
tion where they interfere with its
ambition.
There is no peace for America ex
cept a just peace, a peace that means
a world lit for people to live in.
German ideals, German purposes,
and German practices are the antith
esis of American. The beliefs we
love and honor and uphold are con
temptible to them the objects for
which they will to death millions of
their own men and millions of their
enemy are abhorrent to our ideas
of right and justice their methods
and practices in warfare are an
abomination and horror to us.
The American who now advocates
or wishes for peace, except a just
peace, is either woefully misguided
or blind to America's future and
America's past, to all things Ameri
can—the things which have made
our country great and free, which
hundreds of thousands of Americans
have died to maintain, and for
which Americans now are dying in
France.
There can be no peace with honor
or safety to ourselves or to posterity,
except a just peace, and there can
and will be no other peace. Work
for a lesser peace accomplishes
nothing but the hampering of our
effort, the delay of the real peace,
and a greater toll of death of
America's fighting men. Our duty
is to war for a just and righteous
peace to work or speak for any
other peace is treason.—St. Joe Ga
zette.
The country as a whole will re
joice over the defeat of Victor Ber
ger, the Socialist candidate for sen
ator in Wisconsin. Berger is of
Austrian birth and education and
furnished much of the inspiration
for the un-American platform of his
party, and he ran for senator on a
platform demanding the withdrawal
of American troops from France.
"All opposition to the administra
tion must be wiped out, no matter
whether it was gumshoe politics
from Missouri or pompadour trea
son from Wisconsin" was the senti
ment of the Iowa Democrats ex
pressed at their recent conference.
"Some farmers are exceedingly
peculiar," declares the Perry Chief.
"They will object to business men
running the business affairs of the
state or nation and believe every
thing they read in a farm paper
edited by a man who never did any
farm work in his life."
A man can not be half patriotic.
It isn't on the books. Those who
are not actively for America and her
allies are against us. A man must
either walk or be carried if he is to
get anywhere and this is a poor
time for any, person to insist on be
ing carried.
Yellow paint may not make a
pro-German loyal but it gives him a
reputation that will never be lived
down," says the Algona Republican.
Secretary Daniels says the navy
now has one thousand fighting ships,
fully manned, armed and provision
ed. Certainly reassuring news.
By the way, what's become of
Lenine and Trotzky, who figured so
extensively in the dispatches last
month?
Anyway the Hindenburg shells
were in Paris by April 1, and maybe
that what the old barbarian meant.
Sheriff's Sale.
By virtue of an Execution, direct
ed to me from the Clerk of the Dis
trict Court of Decatur County, Iowa,
on a judgment obtained in said
court, on the 12th day of February,
1918, hi favor of J. A. Harris as
Plaintiff, and against Anna McKin
ley, J. J. Summers, Mrs. J. J. Sum
mers, E. L. Strecker and Mrs. E. L.
Strecker as Defendants, for the sum
of Four Hundred and Ninety-one
Dollars and 28 Cents, |34.56 at
torney's fees and costs taxed at
$19.85, and accruing costs, I have
levied upon the following Real Es
tate, taken as the property of said
Defendants, to satisfy said execu
tion, to-wit:
The west one-half of the south
twenty acres of the southwest one
fourth of the northwest quarter of
section 19, township 69, range 25,
west 5th P. M., containing 10 acres,
more or less.
And will offer the same for sale
to the highest bidder for cash in
hand, on the 19th day of April, A.
D. 1918, in front of the Court House
door in Leon, Iowa, at the hour of
10 o'clock A. M. of said day, when
and where due attendance will be
given by the undersigned.
Dated at Leon, Iowa, March 19,
1918. :7iS
John A. Fulton,
34-2t Sheriff of said County.
Getyonr rallpaper at the Rexall
17-tf
"Who Will Win
This Battle?"
Much of vour comfort depends upon
knowing that your system will perforin
its functions properly.
Your kidnevs are the filters of the body.
If they become inactive and fail to elim
inate the waste matter, they are apt to
throw the whole mechanism of the body
out of order, thus toxic poisons can ac
cumulate in the system and bo as deadly
as snake venom.
Besides causing the minor ailments of
rheumatism, sciatica, lumbago and back
ache, neglect of the kidneys is apt to
develop into more serious diseases, such
as diaoetes or stone in the bladder.
Rid the body of t6:cic poisons—clean
the bladder, and kidneys and euro the
twinges of rheumatism with An-u-ric
(double strength).
Anuric was first.discovered by Dr. Pierce,
and has benelited thousands of sufferers
as well as appeased and eliminated the
ravages of the more serious kidney dis
eases. Now procurable at any good drug
store, or send direct to Dr. V. M. Pierce,
Invalids' Hotel and .Surgical Inst.,'Buffalo,
N. Y., for trial package. Enclose 10 cents.
If you have rheumatism or kidney
trouble, why nor, let Dr. Pierce's Anuric
(double strength) win the battle?
Sioux CITY, IOWA.—"For some time I
have been having
kidney trouble. My
kidneys seemed to
bo congested and
my back would ache
and be so sore that I
could scarcelystand
my clothes bearing
ii it. When I
stooped over I could
hardly straighten
up again, and my
bladder bothered
me—frequent ex
cretion. Just about ten days ago I. began
taking the Anuric Tablets and my back
has quit aching and this bladder weak
ness has leit me. Anuric is the best kid
ney medicino 1 have ever used."—MRS.
MARY DU HARRY, 1013 5th Street.
Milt Manchester
AUCTIONEER
Nothing too lig or too
for me to cry. My
work satisfies. Phone or
write for dates.
M. Manchester,
LEON IOWA
Original Notice.
In the District Court of Decatur
County, Iowa, April Term, 1918.
Belle Richardson,
Plaintiff.
vs.
L. E. Lasley,
Defendant.
To L. E. Lasley:
You are hereby, notified that on
the 31th dayNof January, 1918, there
was filed in tfie office of the Clerk
of the District Court, .of Decatur
County, Iowa, the petition of the
plaintiff in the above entitled cause,
claiming of you the sum of Thirty
Dollars, as money justly due from
you, with interest thereon at per
cent from the 28th day of February,
1912, for
Defendant's one certain promis
sory. note executed by the defendant
to the State Savings Bank of La
moni. Iowa, dated February 28th,
1912, bearing 8% interest from
date that said plaintiff signed said
note as surety, and paid the safne
as such surety, and said bank en
dorsed said note to plaintiff, and
plaintiff is now the owner thereof,
in due course and for a valuable con
sideration. ..
Original Notice was placed in the
hands of the Sheriff of Decatur
County, Iowa, for service on said
defendant that said Sheriff return
ed said notice certifying that the de
fendant could not be found in the
State of Iowa, and that defendants
residence and address was unknown.
The plaintiff has filed affidavit
for service by publication on said
defendant the plaintiff states, that
the defendant is a non-resident of tne
State of Iowa, and that personal
service of the original notice in said
cause cannot be made on said de
fendant within the State of Iowa.
The Plaintiff avers that the De
fendant has property situated in De
caur County, Iowa, not exempted
from execution, and the Plaintiff has
filed bond for attachment and asks
that writ of attachment issue
against* the goods, chattels and ef
fects of said Defendant.
Affidavit for attorney fee, on file.
(For further particulars, see Pe
tition
You are further notified, that un
less you appear thereto and defend
before noon of the second day of the
April Term, 1918, of the District
Court of Decatur County, low.*,
which will commence at Leon, Iowa,
on the 22nd day of April, 1918, a
default will be entered against you,
and such an amount of attached
ge
roperty belonging to you as shall
found necessary to pay said note,
with interest, costs and attorneys
Willi liiivi caij womi
fee, will be subjected to the pay
ment of judgment rendered- there
for.
Amos P. Olsen,
32-4t. Attorney for Plaintiff.
Notice of Final Report.
In the District Court of Iowa, in
and for Decatur County. No. 2115
Probate
In the Estate of Martha H. Har
less, deceased.
To F. A. Harless, H. HL Harless, J.
W. Sherrow And All Whom It May
rA«nAVfl
it VTT HI HI UIA a a* asn*
1
his final report therein in the office
of the Clerk of the District Court in
and for the aforesaid County, and
has asked for its approval and his
discharge from further duty or re
sponsibility therein, and that said re
port and application for disc/iargo
will come on for hearing before tne
Court aforesaid at Irfson, Iowa, on
tne 22nd day of April, ,A. D., U18,
at whi-n time ana place you oa-i ap
ncar and show cause if any
have, why said final report should
not be approved and the undersign
ed discharged from any further duty
34_2t Administrator.
Builinoion
Rn: le
Through Our Membership
In the Federal Reserve Banking System we
are placed In a stronger position than ever
before to take care of the requtrements of
all our depositors, whether large or small,
whether they keep checking or savings
accounts and at the same time to give them
the most modern banking methods.
Why not open an account with us and
begin at once to participate in these bene
fits and the additional protection which
this system gives to your money deposited
with us?
MEMBER
FEDERAL HESERVE
SYSTEM
EXCHANGE
LEON IOWA,
"I Don't Know
What to Cook.",
Many a good housewife makes use
of the above words at this season of the
year when her ability to prepare a good
meal Is taxed to the limit.
This Grocery Store
can relieve her of the worry. We carry
everything in Canned Goods, Dried Fruits*
Vegetables, Coffee and Tea. Come In and
glance over.ourjstock. You'll see some
thlng good to eat here and at right prices.
BRADFIELD
The Cash Grocer
Phone 236 All orders Collect on Delivery
Bring me your e|fs, I pay cash or trade for them
J. L, GOODING
"The Live Auctioneer."
The man who will get you the most money for
your stuff and who always makes a sale a success. He
knows the value of stock. Has cried more sales than
any auctioneer in this section.
Write or ohone for dates.
Kellerton, Iowa.
Don't Be Unfair
to yourself or your Government, or say you never had an op
portunity. With the demand for everything you can raise on
a farm far-and-away ahead of the supply and prices higher
than ever before, all renters, farm hands and those with lim
ited capital who know a good thing on sight and would like
to turn farmer, should get busy and cash in on this chance-of
a-life-time before it is too late, help win the war and help
themselves at the same time. Tell me how much you can In
vest, what you want to raise, whether you would prefer to live
in Colorado, Wyoming, Montana or Nebraska, and I will tell
you how you can homestead a whole section of land or secure
an improved farm on mighty easy and attractive terms. Sit
right down and write me today—there's no time to lose if
you are to get started |his spring.
ww***
INTEREST
PA ID
ON
TI/AE
D6P05IT5
3
A
8. B. HOWARD, Immigrate Afteat
ftoom 13SA, Building,Oonhp, Neb.
'Jv
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