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The daily Gate City and constitution-Democrat. (Keokuk, Iowa) 1916-1922, April 19, 1916, Image 5

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^TEDKESDAY, APR. 19, 16
101 ON VIADUCT
Reconstructed
Keokuk and Hamilton
Bridge Will be One of the ^Finest
Crowing* on Upper River ...
When Completed.
FLOORING BEING LAID
Steel for Viaduct in Place and Boards
Are Being Laid Now—
One Span Yet to be
Rebuilt.
Keokuk will have one of the finest
crossings on the Mississippi river,
when the reconstructed Keokuk and
Hamilton bridge is completed and
the roadway on the second deck is
opened for traffic. It will be possible
to go from the center of the business
district of Keokuk directly across the
river and over to Hamilton without
crossing a railroad track. The via
duct which connects the Keokuk end
of the bridge with the thoroughfare
ending at Second and Main streets is
being constructed as rapidly as pos
sible.
All of the steel for this viaduct
has been put in place, and workmen
are busy now flooring the approach.
There is a very gentle grade on this
side and the grade on the Illinois ap
proach is no more than that of Third
street between Main and Blondeau.
The viaduot on the Keokuk side
rill connect with the roadway which
will be built across the land pur
chased by the city for this purpose.
It will virtually give Keokuk a high
bridge. The viaduct posts are set at
intervals between the railroad tracks,
jiving sufficient clearance.
One Old Span to Change.
All of the bridge spaxut have been
replaced but one, and that is the
span which was knocked out at the
time the War Eagle struck the bridge.
This spans one of the deepest parts
of the river, and on account of the
high water is has been Impossible to
get the false work In position to take
down this span. As soon as the water
goes down enough to allow for an
anchorage this span will be torn out
and the new steel put into place.
When this is done the roadway on
the second deck of the bridge can be
completed.
The bridge engineers will have a
three story bouse in approximately
the same location as was the did
house. The engineers will "have noth
ing to do with the upper deck of the
bridge except to see that It is cleared
whenever it is necessary to open the
draw. The lower deck of the bridge
house will lead to the engine room.
As soon as it is possible to use
the upper roadway the first floor of
the bridge will be taken up and anew
floor Installed. This will consist of
the railroad ties and, steel supports as
is used In all railroad bridge floors.
It was planned to have the bridge
done about the first of June and there
are still six weeks before that time
in which to finish up the job. It is
expected that the most of the work,
at least, can be completed by then
OBITUARY.
[Contributed.]
Ijewis Stephenson was born In Cin
cinnati, Ohio, June 9, 1"834. and de
parted this life April 13, 1916, aged
78 years, ten months, three days. He
was united in marriage to Mies Cath
erine Armstrong of Keokuk, Iowa, in
1866. The wife preceded him In death
eleven years ago. To this union were
bom nine Children, Edward* Lewis
Stephenson, who died at the age of
seven years Mrs. Bird, Keokuk
Benjamin Sbephenson, Keokuk John
Stephenson, Wlayland, Mo. Mrs. F.
Sclrwanzel, Wayland, Mo. Milo
Stephenson, Keokuk Herbert Steph
enson, Alexandria, Mo. Homer and
Robert Stephenson, Keokuk. Besides
the children, there are nineteen grand
children and two great-grandchildren,
also two brothers, Isaac of Shelby
county, Mo., and John P., of Keokuk,
and a host of friends to mourn his
departure.
He enlisted In the army at the out­|publican
break of the civil war and for three
years faithfully served his country.
He was promoted to the rank of cap
tain before being discharged. He was
an honored member of the Belknap
FOUR DOCTORS
DISAGREED
Pains Disappeared After Use
of Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound.
•Wilmington, Del.—"I was suffering
from a terrible backache and pains in
my side, with bear
ing down pains and
was very nervous.
I was always tired,
always drowsy,
never could get
enough sleep and
could not eat. I had
four doctors and
each told me some
thing difTerept. I
read of Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegeta­
ble Compound and decided to try it. I
got good results and I now feel better
than I have felt for years and I am gain
ing in weight. I can gladly recommend
it to all women."—Mrs. GEORGE W.
SEBOLD, 1611 West 4th Street, Wilming
ton, Del.
Backache and bearing down pains
are danger signals which every woman
should heed. Remove the cause of these
aches and pains by taking Lydia E.Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound, that good
old root and herb medicine. Thousands
of women have testified to its virtues.
For forty years it has been making
women strong, curing backache, ner
vousness, ulceration and inflammation,
weakness, displacements, irregularity
and periodic pain.
If you want special advice write
Lydia E. Pinlcnam Medicine Co*
confidential, Lynn, Mass*
Post, 515, Department of Iowa. He
was converted and united with the
Methodist church in young\manhood.
The funeral service was conducted
at the home near Alexandria, Satur
day, April 15, at 10 a. m., by Rev. J.
A. Moorman, assisted by the Belknap
Post of Keokuk. The body was laid
to rest in the Frazee cemetery.
Throw Off Colds and Prevent Grip.
When you feel a cold coming on, take
LAXATIVE BROMO QUININE. It
removes cause of Colds and Grip.
Only One "BROMO QUININE." E.
W. GROVE'S signature on box. 25c.
GOLDEN ELECTION
BRINGS OUT VOTE
Old'Village Board Re-elected With a
Tie on Office of Village
Clerk.
GOLDEN, April 19.—The election
Tuesday In Golden was hotly con
tested and reminded older citizens of
the times when the wet and dry Issue
was fought out at the polls. Nearly
everybody in Golden voted Tuesday,
there being 172 men's and 137 wom
en's ballots cast Four autos were in
service taking the voters to and from
the polls. The old village board was
re-elected and there was a tie on the
office of village clerk.
Following Is the result:
Trustees—H. G. Franzen (Ind.),
159 Robert Wheeler (Ind.), 154 J.
M. Wallace (Ind.), 186 J. O. Rey
nolds (citizens), 143 R. C. Taylor
(citizens), 147 H. L. Gans (citizens),
129.
For clerk—Harry J. Wible (Ind.),
153 Carl H. DetnjerB (citizens), 153.
BONAPARTE.
Richard Shafer is seriously in at
his home on North Washington street
with pneumonia. All day Sunday he
was In a dangerous condition, but at
noon on Monday was reported slight
ly better, though not out of danger
yet
Halsey Pender, son of Mrs. Wilbur
Pender, is quite ill.
S. G. Lindsay, graduate veterinarian
Is now located at the Hooper barn
here and ready for business. Mr.
Lindsay is a graduate of a Kansas
City veterinarian college.
Elmer Smith has opened a feed
store in the brick building on the cor
ner of Second and Washington street.
Big Vote for Unknown.
Charles City Press: One of the
freaks of the presidential primary
was the majority vote polled in Floyd
county by Olson over Adams for re
national committeeman.
Olson was entirely unknown here,
but his name came first on the bal
lot and that settled it. If Adams had
not been favorably known he would
have fared much worse.
WHATCAN YOU DO FOR CATARRH?
Ask Yourself the question. How often has the doctor failed,
|. as have ointments, salves, vapours? What you should do.
The easy, common-sense method—
that costs so little—that is so quickly
^d vigorously effective—Is often the
last resort of many Catarrh sufferers.
Why. it is hard to say. One of the
specialists of the Swift Specific Com
Wny in Atlanta-1-ft physician of stand
jog and national reputation because of
tis knowledge of blood disorders, made
the assertion that If the majority of
Catarrh sufferers would buy and faith
fully take S. S. S., they could effectu
ally get rid of Catarrh.
S- S. S. goes straight to tie seat of
trouble, the blood. It spreads its In
fluence over every organ in the body,
®omes through the veins and arteries,
enables the mucous surfaces to ex
J~5nS® acids and irritating substances
jor red blood corpuscles that effectual
feanse the system and thus put an
•j1® to all Catarrhal poison. S. S. S.
out the stomach of mucous ac
cumulations, enables only sure, blood-
making materials to enter the intes
tines, combines with these food ele
ments to enter the circulation, and in
less than an hour is at work through
out the body in process of purification.
S. S. S. is made from barks, roots
and herbs that are food and tonic for
the blood. It stimulates—gives the
blood power to throw off poisons. You
will soon realize its wonderful influ
ence by the absence of Headache, a
clearing of the air passages, a steaoily
improved nasal condition, and a sense
of bodily relief that proves how com
pletely Catarrh often infests the entire
system.
You will find 3. S. S. on sale at all
drug stores. It is a remarkable rem
edy for all blood affections, such as
Eczema. Rash, Lupus, Tetter, Psorias
is. Boils, and all other diseased condi
tions of the blood. For special advice
on any blood disease write The Swift
Specific Company, Medical Depart
ment, Room 11, Atlanta, Ga. A vols'
substitutes.
our
S&V ife.
'iJil&Siti. V.i-
The Nauvoo
Vise Eunice Walther is afflicted they
with the measles, in her Nauvoo
gr'ay in color with green stripes. They
of baseball Sunday, April 30.
The various estimates of the popu
lation of Nauvoo are interesting, but
it would be more Important if some
body could say just horw hard the
town is hustling.
Miss Ida Beecher who has been an
office clerk, in Jos. Ochsner's imple
ment store In Nauvoo, and Miss
Katherine Hoenig, who has been
making her home in Nauvoo for some
time, are attempting to make a deal
towards purchasing a farm over at
West Point, Iowa.
April 16, 1918, was the coldest day
this country has known in twenty
years, according to no less an aufhor
ity than the chief of the weather bu
reau.
"Ves," murmured a Nauvoo sliy
young man who was trying to an
nounce his engagement to a few of
his good friends. "We are engaged,
and I'm going to be a Joom grune."
Slightly mixed.
Nauvoo had an exciting school
election last Saturday when a presi
dent and two members of the district
school hoard were to be chosen.
Three female candidates were an
nouncd at nearly the last moment
and things began to wax warm. Be
fore the polls closed 223 votes were
cast and after the votes were count
ed, the women found that they had lost
out. Max Krueger was elected pres
ident, and John Marzolf and A1 Ha'On,
the two members of the board. Their
opponents were Mrs. L. L. Hudson,
Mrs. J. F. Argast and Mrs. J. A. Bortz.
It was one of the most exciting elec
tions and the largest- vote polled at
a school election ever held in the
history of Nlauvoo.
Often the genius of the son is the
cropping out of the suppressed tend
encies of the father.
You folks of the larger towns don't
need to think that we of a little
county place don't have good times.
Don't you feel sorry for us. Why, we
just have the best of times. True,
picture shows and operas, and other
like things don't often come our way,
and most all our amusements are
own
makeup, but they cost
comparatively nothing, and we enjoy
Many Nauvoo citizens are beating
the old hen out of a job this spring
with a tin box and a coal oil lamp.
(Word has been received in Nauvoo
that the Promoter Petsch of the new
Nauvoo interurban proposition will
be In Nauvoo soon to begin opera
tions on the railroad scheme and
close all legal formalities regarding
the road with Nauvoo's committee.
Mr. Payne, who is connected with
the gentleman in the interurban line,
says his partner has the money to
build the road and in the meantime
Nauvoo has adopted that fashionable
policy of watchful waiting.
Carthage, the county seat of this
county, is going to have a $50,000
postoffice building, a gift of the Unit
ed States government. Nauvoo is,
satisfied with a $3,000 building, which
the government has arranged for us.
When the democratic and republi-j
can viotories come in this fall, most
a.ll newspapers will have to dig out of
the dusty storeroom all the cuts of!
the roosters it used to print when
Grover Cleveland and a few others
had a habit of being elected president
All publishers had better look for
them now, for they might feel sorry
if they can't find their high-combed
chickens to join in the celebration.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Salm, Jr., one
of Nauvoo's pleasant and popular
young married couple, were tender
ed a most delightful surprise party
instigated by a number of their
friends. The event occurred last
Snnday evening and was in honor of
their tenth marriage anniversary.
The social "burglars" called when
they knew that the couple were ab
sent, and took possession of the
house, but which only made the sur
prise more complete. Mr. and Mrs.
Salm were presented with some tin
ware to use in their culinery depart
ment until the approach of the next
important, wedding anniversary. A
dainty luncheon was served and when
all departed they expressed them
selves as having a most enjoyable
time.
News comes from neighboring towns
now and then that an offender Is giv
en a heavy fine for some misdemeanor.
Had these offenders lived in Nauvoo
there is a probability that they would
have been jacked up rather severely,
let oft with a small fine or a stinging
reprimand, if the case was not dismiss
ed entirely.
Nauvoo's Industrial society will meet
at the home of Mrs. Wm. H". Bicker
on North Thirteenth street Thursday
afternoon of this week.
Mrs. Wm Bentz of Nauvoo, has re
turned from Keokuk where she has
been visiting her son Rollle and fami
ly.
Miss Rose Boegner is in Nauvoo for
her vacation during the Easter period.
She is attending college in Waverly,
Iowa.
Henry Letnhard and Louis- Hbhl who
are ?oing to college up near Galesburg,
are at home to remain until after
Easter.
Mr. and MVS. Cecil J. Baxter in
—fc y.
TSE DAILY GATE CITY
Nauvoo, 11L, April 19, 1916
It certainly pays to advertise in thil .Nauvoo entertained their children, Mr.
'great family newspaper, The
Keokuk
I and Mrs. C. J. Baxter, Jr., and Mr. and
Daily Gate City and Constitution-1 Mrs. Otto Heitzman of Ft. Madison for
Democrat. No sooner had this col- several days recently.
umn mentioned that Nauvoo needed aj The base ball season in Nauvoo will
photographer in a recent issue than be formally opened In about a week,
one appeared and will visit this city Those who appear to know around
every Wednsday of eaoh week. He there seem to think that Nauvoo's
will be stationed in the old gallryjteam will not finish the season close
building adjoining the opera .house. to the bottom in the number of games
R©vplay.
home. ^called to Peoria by Bishop Dunne to
Nauvoo's ball boys have ordered take part in pontifical mass, so there
their new uniforms and they will b® I will jje
U3. badly
Father Thoien of Nauvoo was
no
voo»B
holy week services In Nau-
Catholic church next week,
expect to play their first match game while nobody is worrying, still war
talk with Germany and Mexico re
minds us that the Nauvoo, Keokuk and
Ft. Madison interurban line has not
yet started construction work.
Nauvoo's city council members will
meet in adjourned session next Mon
day evening.
Let the young man in the city out
of a job try a year on the farm. Plow
ing behind a mule will give him an
entirely new constitution, take the
h.urt, but since the accident It
wag
them all the more for our work and hrraken
responsibility. When operas don't
visit us as often as we think they
should, we get to work on a two of
three hour play and put It on the
boards in two or three weeks time.
Now if you don't credit what this
column says about this matter, just
come to Nauvoo and spend a few
weeks and see.
fOUn(j that a bone in his ankle
HSSW.
k'j it- •35
EDUCATORS FAVOR
TEXT BOOK CHANGE
Cube Root, Least Common and Great
est Common Divisor May
Lose Out.
DES MOCNE6, April 19.—'Evidence
placed before the committee on elimi
nation of useless and obselete sub
jects from the public school hooks at
the session at the state house proved
'to the educators that their recom
mendations to the last convention of
the Iowa Teachers' 'association were
correctly based. The committee now
is preparing a schedule to show how
the material in the tort books should
he prepared so as to be of practical
value to the pupil.
Study of stocks and securities in
the future will not deal with theor
etical stocks. In each city the stocks
of the street railway company, the in
dustrial concerns, city and county
bonds and other securities will be
studied. Pupils will be instructed
honj to Invest and how to determine
whether certain stocks are worth
buying.
The committee on arithmetic sent
letters to seventy-nine prominent
'Iowa educators asking their opinion
on whether certain parts of the arith
metic should be dropped. Only seven
of the seventy-nine eduoators voted
kinks out of his -throat, the gas out of in favor of retaining cube root six
his stomach, the weakness out of his for retaining the least common mul
toes and give him a good appetite, an
honest living and a sight of heaven.
It is said the Wonderland show boat
is headed towards Nauvoo and is due
here In about two or three weeks. The
boat Is on the Illinois river now and
will ply the big creek north bound as
soon as all towns are visited on that
little pond.
After living on milk for several
years, a man has gone Insane. An In
vestlgation of some of the milk we
drink doubtless would elicit surprise
that the man held out that long.
Nauvoo's Priscilla club will not
meet until Thursday afternoon of next
week.
A violin recital will take place In
the Nauvoo opera house on the even
ing of May 1. A gentleman of Keokuk
who is teaching, a number of Nauvoo
and vicinity youths will give the re
cital. His young son who Is only nine
years of age will also take part, with
the instructor and his pupils.
rt
may be that some mean men ob
ject to the harem skirt because the
wind doesn't have any chance of get
ting action on it.
Nauvoo's Domestic {Science club met
with Mrs. Wm. F. Hertel a few even
ings ago and hdmitted five new mem
bers.
The ladies who are arranging a leap
year daupe in the Nauvoo opera house
for EasJbr Monday evening, April 24
are anxious for all to come and enjoy
a good time with them.
When Ervin Hudson fell off a freight
wagon last week and the wheels ran
iover him it was thought he was not
tiple and four for the greatest com
mon divisor. The affirmative vote
of seventy-nine persons on other top
ics follows: Apothecary's weight,
four troy weight, six folding paper,
none foreign exchange, seven par
tial payments, twenty-one complex
fractions, eight true discount, six
partnership with time, two com
pound proportion, thirteen metric
system, eleven. All of the subjeots
mentioned have been recommended
for elimination from the arithmetic
as useless.
Committees reported on spelling
grammar, history, civics, reading and
other subjects,
SALEM.
Under the auspices of the W» CL
T. U., a temperance program was
given Sunday evening. A large audi
ence was present.
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Brody and
little daughter Dorothy, are at St.
Louis spending the Easter holidays
with relatives.
Mrs. John Pickard and daughter re
turned to Keokuk Saturday after a
few days with relatives here.
Leon Smith and family enjoyed a
visit with Mr. Smith's parents from
Birmingham, Sunday.
Mrs. G. T. Powell recently enter
tained her nieces, Misses Maude
Marybelle and Grace Mathews from
Mt. Pleasant.
Mr. and Mrs. William Bunker re
cently entertained Mr. and Mrs. J.
W. Stlne of Stockport.
Following a visit at the homes of
1907,
a am
de threm men imoke pipes
ffhw on« smoked before
afoot high! We tell you
tobacco joy you can hatch,
and coolness just beat all reckoning.
that it can't bite, can't parch
Figure out how a smoke like this will
frr'i./v
ESTJ
PiLisBum
I
THE
SOF DRINKS
her father Hiram Pickard, and her
son Bert Wolf, Mrs. Frank Wolf re
turned to Ottumwa Saturday night.
Miss Axmie Packer, principal of
Farmington schools, spent Saturday
at home.
Miss Martha Welpton of Chicago is
spending a few days with friends.
A. C. Knight and family harve
moved to Mollne, 111.
A number of Masons of Salem at-
palate, sun-up-to- turn- in-time! You go to Prince Albert
like it always was your pal—and don't worry about
your smoke-pas^ Let P. A. take care of the future I
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, Win*ton-Salem, N. C.
prooe&s
jnoves
PAGEFIVB
THE FLOUR
QUESTION SETTLED'«
BEST
I
EST
0*
tended lodge at Hair Ixmdan TqeeJaj.
evening.
W. C. T. U. -wm mart yOZh. MM.
Emma Keller "Wednesday afternoon
of this week.
No8hor**gB^ppe*art,
This,
to yotti
R1NCE
national Jay
hits the smcter^ppeCfte^gpofc
without-amiss 1 Yes,
cuts out aJl argament, all^qaea
tion as to how much pleasure
you can get out of a ptrpe or
rolled cigarette.
P. A. will exceed the liveliest imaginations of
We tell you that its quality, its flavor, aroma
And just add the little old feet
on
your
3
1
Washington Post Ocoastooatly you
meet a man wfeoee nose tint fails to
give thealigbtest-lnaicatloa-oif^djsestulf
shortage.
.,v|||,
**•3
-4
The patented
izxes
that—*aad
yoxjfll Just &tay*-put-&-spell
and- emhraoe—
Prince
x»-
bite andjjorohl
Ybn
simply need an introduction
via a toppyred bag or tk^y red
tin, then youH absorb some
first-hand fkcts thai certainly
will make-ycith-slt-^ip«ai2d
take-na£lce4
Gentlemen, tbbacco safte&o
tion is onexjf fhose little things
in life that's coming" to you if
i£. Prince
Albert will supply that satis
faction just as sure as you're
Albert ti ioM eosiytitherm
in
toppyred baga,
Sc tidy redtinn, lOc
handtome potmd and half-pound tin
humidors and that classy poutui
crystal-gtaam hamidor with the
sponge-moutener top that heap* thm
tobacco
1-
in thm final kind of trim~
atuxnmJ

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