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The daily Gate City and constitution-Democrat. (Keokuk, Iowa) 1916-1922, July 18, 1916, Image 5

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TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1916.
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SIOUX CITY, Iowa July 18.—
Three pei*ras were drowned when
their automobile, enroute to Sioux
City, dashed through the railing of
a bridge over the Sioux river here
yesterday. The dead: George Foun
tain, 30 years old Florence Wake
field, 17 Bveljrn Wakefield, 15.
DUBUQUE, Iowa, July IS.—Edward
Tibey, life long resident of this city
and one of the best "known contrac
tors in this territory, died at his
home here. He was fifty-two years
old and had been in failing health
for some time.
"Is
IOWA CITY, Iowa, July 18.—
Bhodes scholarship examinations are
announced for October 3 and 4, at
Iowa university. The winner will be
sent to Oxfoid university, England,
with $1,500 a year allowance, for
three years. Unmarried students
more than 19, and less than 25 years
old who have completed their sopho
more year, or better in a recognized
college or university, may compete,
if they came from an Iowa institu
tion.
IOWA CITY, Ioya, July 18.—The
Muscatine-Iowa City interurban rail
way company is beginning a fight for
its life. The question of surrender
ing the lease to the lessor, Jacob,
M. Dickinson, receiver of the C., R.
I. and P. R. R. Co., will be decided
today. The Iowa City-Muscatine line
hag been in operation since March
l, 'quly7~antt"tM«"liegn~tn: the bands
of a receiver about two weeks. *5J.
SIOUX CITY, Iowa, July 18.—Sev
eral passengers in the smoking car
and 'W. H. Chappell, baggageman,
were Injured when the west bound
Tama and Sioux City local on the
Chicago and Northwestern railroad,
left the rails at a point about one
half mile west of Turin. Investiga
tion showed the wreck had been
caused by "sunkist" track, the in
tense heat causitag thei rails to ex
pand.
i-
EUXHfcA, Iowa, July 18.—Work on
the coal mines near this city is to
begin this week. J. L. Reese, admin
istrator of the estate of this brother,
D. B. Reese, who is the principal
stockholder in the company, is here
and will see to it that work is start
ed properly. Experts are in charge
of the sinking of the shaft and the
underground work.
DES MOINES, July 18.—Judge
Martin Wade in the federal court has
handed down a decision which will
allow the Chicago,- Rock Island and
Pacific railroad to manage Us own
affairs in the controversy between
employes of the Short line and men
on the main line as to shifting or
men from one position to another in
conflict wtth senorlty rights. The
controversy arose when employes of
the Rock Island Short line protested
against being shifted to the main
line without .consideration, for tieir
senior service, and Judge Milo Smith
of Linn county granted an injunction
restraining the railroad company
from shifting the men.
«.
Have a Heart!
ww
'XVM,/
IM»'. (K\-
75S=S -X'*N*
QUJNCY, 111., July 18.—Charles H.
Williamson, prominent for years in
Qulncy business circled and- one of
the republican leaders In Illinois, is
critically ill at 'hie Liawndale home,
grave fears being entertained that be
Will not survive.
AURORA, 111., July 18.—Delegates
In eesrion at the annual international
convention of the Loyal Order of
Moose which opened Monday unan
imously Voted to employ none other
than union labor in the erection of
any more buildings at Moose Heart,
the national headquarters.
CHICAGO, 111., July 1«.—The water
power dam at Joliet, held on ar lease
by the Boonomy Light and Power
company, reverted automatically to
the state Monday. Bids for a new
lease were requested same time ago,
but the Economy company was the
Dpn't forget how hot
your battery gets these
days. Better have it
inspected once in a
£r while. Costs nothing.
Electric Shop
ip. The Willard Service Station
b/1001 Johnson St. Phone 507
Free inspection of any battery at any time
Illinois—Iowa—M issouri
IOWA.
*.r. fTf $
only bidder and its bid was consider
ed too low by Governor Dunne.
MISSOURI.
ST. JOSEPH, Mo., July 18.—The
Buchanan county court was asked
yesterday to place extra guards
around the county jail to prevent it
from being blown up by dynamite as
had been threatened in anonymous
letters received by Oscar D. MciDan
iel, prosecuting attorney, whose wife
was clubbed to death in the bedroom
of her home late Friday night.
FUILTON, Mo., July 18'.—'Mrs. Mar
garet Lawrence, 73 years old, the
last of a family of 19 children, died
Sunday, at her home east of this
city. jr'::v
HANNIBAL, Mo., July 18.—Mrs.
Laura Reuben yesterday delivered
to the police her 17 year old son.
Grant Reuben, who Saturday night
shot' Walter Tucker, 57 years old,
through the heart as the result of an
altercation over a match.
CHARiLESTON, Mo., July 18.—A
stock company to promote the-boring
of an artesion well in Charleston is
being proposed by leading citizens.
It is thought the general health of
the community would be benefited
greatly by the use of artesian well
water. It is proposed to dig the well
by popular subscription.
PALMYMA, Mo., July 18.—Secre
tary George B. Thompson has an
nounced September 6, 7, 8, 9 as the
date of the Palmyra fair. r.
ST. LOU'IS, Mo., July 18.—Cyrus
Barrett Burnham, for nearly seventy
years a resident of St. Louis, one of
the organizers of the National Bank
of Commerce and a prominent figure
in military circles in Missouri
throughout the civil war, died yester
day. He was 94 years old.
CHARLESTON, Mo., July ,18.—The
eyes of the ^watermelon world are
this year turned on southern Mis
souri, where the prospects are bright
for the best crop in the history of
this section. The melons will soon
be reajly for the first shipments and
the growers twill get $200 per car.
Last year the first cars brought •-60.
TELL THEIR TROUBLES
TO THE PRESIDENT
Railways Say They are Facing a Busi
ness Crisis and Will Appeal to
Wilson.
WASHINGTON. July 18.—Personal
appeal to President Wilson for as
sistance In what they term a "busi
ness crisis" will be made by represen
tatives of the big railways tomorrow.
Confronted on the one hand by pro
visions of the Clayton anti-trust act
which they claim are hazy and com
plicated, and on the other by threat
of ^00,000 railway workers to strike
unless granted shorter hours and
more pay, railway officials declare
their situation is serious. The presi
dent will be asked in the first place
to suggest a delay In the Clayton's
acts provision which governs the pur
chase of supplies by the roads until
the railroad officials and the inter
state commerce commission "have
had opportunity to stud^ it." This
Is to go into effect in a few weeks
unless congress by resolution delays
it.
The four great trainmen brother
hoods are voting on whether or not
to strike. Some administration of
ficials say a strike which would tie
up the railroads of the country at
this time, would be a calamity.
It is likely railway officials, when
they see the president tomorrow, will
take up this question with the other.
They desire either that their men sub
mit their claims to arbitration or an
investigation of railway wages by the
interstate commerce commission or
by a congressional committee.
Los Angeles has the largest area—
337.92 square miles—of any city of
the country.
the oholoe of women who know
a
IOWA TROOPS ARE
ORDERED TO MOVE
•r
Will be On Their Way to the
Border Within Forty
Eiffkt Hours.
DES MOINES, Iowa, July
18.—Iowa's brigade of infan
try, three batteries of artillery
and hospital corps, units will
be on their way to the lexi
con border, probably Browns
ville, within forty-eight hours,
according to orders received
this afternoon by Col. Cktorge
Morgan from General Barry
at Chicago. It is understood
that the railroad will com
mence assembling cars tonight.
YESTERDAY
Complication of Diseases Was Fatal
Last Evening to 13-Year.Old
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
H. A. Bank.
BORN IN BROOKFIELD
Had Lived
Pupil In
Most of Life in Keokuk
Washington School—Pa
tient Sufferer During the
Last Illness.
Caroline Marie Bank, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Bank, No. 627
Concert street, died yesterday even
ing. Death occurred at the family
home. The child had been afflicted
for the past four or flveyears with
valvular heart trouble. Recently
other complications had set in.
The decedent was born May 15,
1903, in Brookfield, Missouri. She
was the daughter of Herman A. and
Katherine L. Bank. Shortly after
birth, her parents moved to this city,1
which had since been her home. Be
sides her parents, Howard A. Bank,
a brother, is the sole surviving close
relative.
In Keokuk she had lived most of
her short span of years. She attended
the George Washington school when
her health permitted. She was al
ways a popular child with her play
mates, her sweet and loving disposi
tion endearing her to all whom she
met She was a favorite with her
teachers in the schools.
During her last illness she was a
patient sufferer. Never, even when
suffering greatly, did she complain of
her troubles, but bore her illness with
calm resignation. Her death is a
great blow to the parents, and the
entire community sympathizes with
them in their grief.
West Wants Battleships.
WASHINGTON, July 18. Pacific
coast senators today were defeated,
18 to 48, in an attempt to provide by
amendment to the general naval bill
that three of the proposed capital
Bhlps be maintained permanently upon
the Pacific coast
Senators Works, Phelan and Tones
made emphatic speeches for the pro
posal for which Works was author.
Senators Swan son and Iaodge, prin
cipal supporters of the administration
program, insisted that Works' propo
sition was an Infringement of the con
stitutional powers of the president as
commander in chief of the army and
navy. All three coast speakers
pointed out that there is now no first
class battleship on the Pacific coast,
despite threatened danger from Japan.
"The next battle the United States
fleet may fight," said Senator Phelan,
"may be on the Pacific ocean. If so,
the United States has not a single
first-class vessel for its fighting line."
METRO
'i, vfs v.*. t-*
THE daily GATE
WEST POINT VOTES
FOR ITER WORKS
In Special Election Held Yesterday,
There Was Majority of Thirty
for New Improve
". ment.
TWO BOND ISSUES FAIL
Citizens Vote Down Proposition
For Issuance of Bonds to
Cover Work—Want
No Sewer.
[Special to The Gato City.]
WEST POINT, la., July 18.—West
Point voted yesterday to construct a
municipal water works system, but
voted down the proposition for the
issuance of bonds in the sum of
$15,000 for the construction of the
system, and also the bond issue of
$4,000 for the construction of a sewer
system.
The water works proposition car
ried by a majority of thirty rotes.
Although there was a majority of
twenty-four in favor of the issuance
of bonds for this work, this was two
less than enough to secure the pass
age and the measure WHS defeated.
The sewer proposition was lost by
five.
One hundred and thirty-nine women
voted yesterday and 167 men. There
were only two spoiled ballots, one by
a woman and one by a mttn. The
vote on all three propositions was as
follows:
Water works—For, men, 90 wom
en, 75 against, men, 75 women, 60.
Water works bond issue—For, men,
82 women, 70 against, men, 73
women, 55.
Sewer bond IsBue—For, men, 75
women, 62 against, men, f2 women,
60.
The money for the construction of
the water works system will be
raised by warrants or some other
means, as the bond issue was de
feated.
$21,000 SPENT ON
Statement for Year Ending June 30,
Filed With County Clerk, at
Fort Madison Yes
terday.
IS CONSIDERED NOMINAL
Itemized List of Expenses Incurred
By Lee County In Prose
cuting Criminal
Cases.
The expense of the criminal court
for Lee county for the year ending
June 30, 191'6, is shown in a report
filed yesterday with County Clerk O.
R. Johnston by County Auditor A. P.
Meyer. It cost Just $21,020.74 to
keep wheels of the criminal court of
Lee odunty churning for a year. The
amount IB considered as unusually
low however, compared to other coun
ties In the state.
The report is as follows:
(Fees paid by county in all
criminal cases before a
justice of the peace, mag
istrate or police oourt .$€,920.24
Grand jurors fees 688.90
Grand jury witness fees .... 625.54
Grand Jury bailiff fees 63.00
Grand jury clerk's fees 37.50
Fees and expenses of sheriff
and other officers in con
nection with grand jury..
Jurors fees while engaged
Metro Film Corporation presents Francis X. Bushman and Beverly
Bayne in a Million a Minute, at the Hippodrome Theatre tomorrow, mat
inee and evening.
38.60
In trfal of criminal cases..
Witness fees In trial of
criminal cases
Jurors meals, criminal cases
Court report, criminal cases
Taking convicted prisoners
to prison or jail
County jail expenses includ
ing board of prisoners. 8,183.-63
Attorneys fees, defending
348.70
113.25
19.05
224.00
161.11
-*#,
criminals
Do Your
With
v.
310.00
County attorney's"* compen
sation 2,000.00
Assistant county attorney's
compensation 1,000.00
Expenses county attorneys
in criminal cases 11.00
Sheriff's sundry expenses
in criminal cases 59.41
Miscellaneous expenses in
criminal cases 120.00
Tot&I $21,020.74
Will Resume service.
NEW YORK. Juy 18.—The Pacific
Mail Steamship company, which aban
doned its service to the orient a year
ago, declaring the LaFolette seamen's
act made it impossible to continue a
profitable business, today announced
the resumption of service between
San Francisco and the orient on Aug
ust 19.
The company has bought the steam
ers Ecuador, Venezuela and Colombia
at
jbl
cost of $1,100,000 each from the
Royal Dutch West India Mall com
pany. The Ecuador will sail from
San Francisco August 19, the Venez
uela September 16 and Colombia Oct
7.
Officials said that if the venture
proves profitable they will Install a
fleet of steamers in the new service.
High freight rates and the fact that
their company has been divorced from
control by the. Southern Pacific rail
way, makes them believe they can
make money, they said.
Paralyzed Alphabet
NEW YORK, July 18.—Here are
two reasons why bailiffs and judges
and prosecutors and court stenogra
phers die young:
John Zlampattlslodlbetel was fined
$1 for owning an unmuzzled dog.
Robert Wyzyczhowzwwiski is ask
ing the court to change his cogno
men.
Gets There.
Mitchell Republican: If Germany
can't go around or over, she will go
under.
PURE, SWEET
AND MELLOW IS
"OLD KENTUCKY
Has the Luscious Flavor
of Ripe Fruit—A
Wonderful Chew
BEST PLUG TOBACCO MADE
The natural juices of choice to
bacco leaf have an appetizing,
wholesome relish—and the only
way you can get their full benefit
is to chew good plug tobacco.
The choicest Burley leaf pressed
into golden-brown plugs of Old
Kentucky makes a chew that has
never been equalled for mellow
quality and pleasing taste.
The pressing of Old Kentucky
is done so slowly that not a par
ticle of the juice escapes, so that
every chew of Old Kentucky is
full of the wonderful fruity flavor
and wholesome quality that nature
put into the leaf.
You simply can't get so much
delicious appetizing flavor out of
any other chew.
Try a ioc plug of Old Kentucky
and youH get more solid tobacco
enjoyment out of it than you ever
had before. Ask your dealer for
Old Kentucky.
''V'
I- ft a-a
AND MORE
Remember If you buy a range we will
do all the piping free9 from street to
range.
Our prices on gas
$18.00 to $37.OO
For further information oall 7SO
Keokuk Electric Co,
BOO Main Street
MAT.,
2,
GRAND
TONIGHT
V?~
AMUSEMENTS AMUSEMENTS
HIPPODROME
TONIGHT—7,8:IS and 9:30
WILMUTH MERKYL
KEOKUK'S NATIVE SON IN
"The Fortunate Youth"
TOMORROW-
PAGE PIVB
Cooking
ECONOMICAL
ranges run from
3:15 and 4:30. EVENING, 7, 8:15 and 9:30
FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN
with BEVERLY BAYNE
"A MILLION
1
A MINUTE"
A five part Metro Wonderplay.
—ALSO—
MR. and MRS. SIDNEY DREW In Another
High Class METRO DREW Comedy
SWEET CHARITY "l
PEGGY
HYLAND
In Henry Arthur Jones, Famous Drama, Embosced
8cenery and Superb Acting
Saints S Sinners'
Miss Hyland Is one of the first stars of England. She has
youth, beauty and charm and in her first American appearance
has made countless enthusiastic admirers.
ON THE SAME PROGRAM TONIGHT
NEW JUNGLE COMEDY "IN DUTCH"
GRAND TOMORROW, "SalntS and Sinners," "In Dutch," and
Manager Dodge's pictures of the HI Tension excursion—Also
C., B. Q. Dam Pictures.
PROHIBITIONISTS
KEEPING WARM
(Continued from pcce 1)
prohibitionists under the new name.
Ingersoll himself introduced the reso
lution which was referred after heated
debate to a committee of the confer
ence.
H. P. Faris of Missouri, treasurer,
of the prohibitionists. and Mrs.
Frances E. Beauchamp, secretary of
the national committee of the women
prohibitionists lead the opposition.
MEXICAN OUTLAWS
ARE IN FLIGHT
(Continued from page 1
so horrible a place and would move
them at once.
Michlganders Arrive.
EL PASO, Texas, July 18.—The
Thirty-second Michigan infantry regi
ment arrived here today. When the
Thirty-third, which is understood
here not yet to have left Michigan
for the border, arrives, the Wolverine
state will have three brigades of In
fantry here under command of Briga
dier General John Klerk.
%-j.
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If
If* 1
Wl
ivl
I
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1
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'ii
GRAND
TONIGHT
by Beautiful
CA&DS
S. H. AYRE8, CHIROPRACTOR.
Office 323 Blondeau St.
Phone 1411.
Office hours 9 to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 IV.
m„ 7 to 8 p. m.
Other hours and Sunday by appoint*
ment.
W. J. ROBERTS
ATTORNEY AT LAW
28 North Fourth St.
Special Attenlon to Settling Estates.
Killed Her Two Children.
MILAN. Kansas, July 18.—Declar
ing in a note that she did not want
her children to face the future, Mrs.
Effie Beverly shot and killed her boy
and girl as they slept at ber father's
home near here last night. She was
arrested and taken to Wellington.
Authorities say the note left by the
mother declared she intended to kill
her children and then herself. She
had been separated several years from
her husband.
—Advertise
Cet results.
in The Gate City and
v.'.r.

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