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The daily Gate City and constitution-Democrat. (Keokuk, Iowa) 1916-1922, October 26, 1916, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057262/1916-10-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
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IT'S A
WHERE
Iur soda fountain dadnties are the
best. Pure fruit syrups and flav
orings. Ice cream made with the
purest and
gredlents.
most wholesome in-
Lock's Luncheonette
Corner Fourth and Main.
Up-to Date
Optical
Service
RENAUD
OPTOMETRIST
SORDID STORY
TOLD IN COURT
(Continued from page
I shot him lie continually made de
mands upon me that were impos
sible for me to fulfill. When I re
fused he would threaten to kill me."
The jurors cast sympathetic
glances at the rretty little woman in
the witness box as she continued her
story.
"He was built like Jack Johnson,"
she continued. "He was a huge ivaii
physically. Ho -weighed about 280
T..:V
Half Price Millinery Sale
FRIDAY ONLY
Twenty-four choice t'immed hats,
mostly patterns, have been selected from
our large stock of millinery and will be
sacrificed at ONE-HALF their original
selling' price.
These hats are in a variety of the season's best
colors and also a few blacks. Choice materials are
used, silk velvets, messaline and silks, trimmings are
of novelty feathers, ornaments and flowers.
Original values were from $7.50 to $12.50
CHOICE y2 PRICE
PLEASURE TO EAT
THE BEST PEOPLE
MEET
—at—
Lock's Luncheonette
Corner Fourth and Main
WHERE ONLY THE BEST OF
DELICACIES ARE SERVED.
Bouillion Sandwiches
Hot Coffee
Hot Chocolate
Pies Cakes
tadf2Uf*e&
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Keokuk, lowa, announces a
FREE LECTURE
on
Christian Science
by
PROF. HEiRiMANN «. HE RING,
C. S. B.
'Member of the Christian 8cience
Board of Lectureship of The First
Church of Christ Scientist, In
Boston, Mass.
At ELKS HALL
MONDAY EVENING, OCT. 30,
1916, AT 8 O'CLOCK
The public is cordially Invited.
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT.
A Vote for
O. R. Johnston
for
CLERK DISTRICT COURT
Is a Vote for
A! Vollers
As deputy at Keokuk.
Your Vote will be appreciated.
white haired little Billy Beutlnger,
chewing gum vigorously and his
pretty little sisters, grouped about
I her sister, Mrs. Herron, a few feet
I rom the witness chair.
I prompted by Attorney McCarter,
[the woman on trial* for her life gave
the jury a story of a married life
full of horror from the time when
1
she left her home on the island of
Jamaica to marry Beutlnger, then a
quartermaster's clerk in the war de
partment at Washington.
"He beat me when we were In
Washington," she said., "Enroute to
I the Philippines we stopped In Chl
I cago. He made me get out of bed
one night thore because my physical
condition made it impossible for me
to yield to him.
Yost Polishing Squad.
[United Press Leased Wire Service.]
ANN ARBOR, Mich., Oct. 26.—
Coach Yost added the polish to his
squad today in preparation for Syr.v
broker, after he had forced his way
Into her bed room.
"He was a most brutal man when
amorous,'' she testified. "From the cuse's invasion Saturday. Long hours
time I married him until the night
were
spent in perfecting new
pounds" and oV course" I was""afraid of under President Taft today declared
Pj .. he would support Wilson this year
Freouently Mrs. Beutinger paused because of his legislative and foreign
in her recital to send a reassuring policies. He was a classmate and
smile to her five little children, the personal friend of Governor HugheB.
Mot Aery friend"
JWTiat Does the^foiid Owe a MotheiT^
ALL
All that love can give—for cheer.
All that science can give—for re-,
lief.
And sdeccs ha« contributed "Mother's
Friend" to alleviate pain and render aid
preceding, and at confinement, to assist
nature In preparing for rapid recovery
and aararlnc the mother and child per
fect health. It is easllr applied by any-
Get It at rour druggist, and write for free book OB
E he ha a A re
The BradOeld Regulator Co_ SOS Lamar Bldg-, Atlanta. Q».
V-:y.
Plavs
designed especially for the Orange
men. A brief scrimmage session
the last one the week—was due
this afternoon.
-V
William Kammerer Touched Copper
Contacts Containing 440 Volt*
of Electricity, Last
Evening
AT STANDARD FOUR 00
,Tried to Throw Switch in Dark Base
ment and Missed Rubber Handle
—B6y Falls From
Window.
William Kammerer, 314 Concert
street, was knocked unconscious
when he touched the contacts on a
switchboard in the basement of the
Standard Four Tire company plant
Wednesday evening at 6:00 o'clock,
coming in contact with 440 volts of
electricity. He was burned on the
right hand and right foot and also
sustained bruises and cuts when he
fell to the floor.
He was takon home following the
accident, and revived there.
Mr. Kammorer had gone to the
basement at 6:00 o'clock to throw
the switch that shuts oft the water.
It was dark and instead of getting
hold of the rubber handle of the
switch, he touched the copper con
tacts, receiving 440 volts of electri
city.
He was thrown to the floor uncon
scious. Felloe employes who were
waiting for 'aim, became alarmed at
his non-appearance and went in
search for him.
He was found by Mr. Devero, lying
under a piece of apparatus called the
accumulator and It was believed at
first that this had fallen on him be
cause he had a deep gash on his
:cheek
and head.
There are several burns on uis
I right-hand and three blisters on his
1
right foot.
Fell From Window.
Edward Madeline. 16 years old, ac
cidentally fell from a second story
window in 'he warehouse of the
Huiskamp Bros, shoe factory, on
Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock and
waB severely bruised and injured.
Dr. W. M. Hogle who was called,
found that no bones were broken.
The warehouse is on Johnson Btreet
between Second and Third streets.
ARE BACKING
VILLA TO WIN
(Continued from page 1)
Mexico are under way at General
Pershing's headquarters.
Truck trains today are enroute to
the base, hauling winter overcoats
and other heavy clothing for the
troops. Tarred paper roofing to cover
the adobe houses now in course of
construction by the men for winter
shelter, is being taken in quantities.
The winter nights are bitterly cold
on account of the high altitude where
General Pointing's forces are located.
She Talked Too Much.
LOS ANGELES, Calif., Oct. 26.—
The strain of speaking at oampaign
meetings has so affected the throat 6f
Mrs. Inez Mllholland Bolssevain, fa
mous suffragette, that she may have
to undergo an operation. This was
the report circulated here today wjaen
arrangements were made for an X-ray
examination of her throat.
Mrs. Boissevaln has been confined
to her room in the Alexandria hdlel
for several days following her col
lapse after a speech made her» a few
nights ago. Her. sister said her af
fection is wholly the result of her
speaking efforts. It is believed the
illness may force Mrs. Bolssevain to
cancel all her speaking dates.
THE WEATHER
[U. s. Department of Agricultural,
Weather Bureau.]
For Keokuk and vicinity: Fair to
night and probaibly Friday warmer
tonight.
For Iowa: Partly cloudy and warm
er tonight probably unsettled north
east portion Friday partly cloudy
and colder northwest portion.
For Missouri: Fair tonight and
probably Friday: warmer tonight and
south and east portions Friday.
For Illinois: Fair and warmer to
night Friday partly cloudy and
warmer probably unsettled north
portion.
Weather Conditions.
There was light rain in the lower
lake region and Ohio valley, as the
storm center fromi the upper lakes
moved to the northeastern coast, and
cooler weather followed in the upper
Mississippi valley.
Will Support Wilson. Another depression is advancing
[United Press Leased Wire Service.] throuxh North Dakota this morning,
CHICAGO. Oct. 26.—Williard E.
Hotchkiss, dean of the Northwestern
university school of commerce and
director of the census in Chicago
whicj1
IHMMMIHIIII
js causing somewhat warmer,
partly cloudy weather in the plains
In the southern states the weather
Is generally fair, and moderately cool.
River Bulletin.
Flood Stage. Stage. Change.
gt. Paul 14 4.3 x0. 1
La Crosse .... 12 4.4 0.0
Ihibuque 18 4.7 0.0
•Davenport .... 15 3.8 xO.l
Keokuk 14 4.1 x0.7
St. Louis 30 2.9 xO.l
The river will rise slightly from
Davenport to Warsaw during the next
36 hours, becoming stationary by
Saturday.
Local Observations.
Oct. Bar.Ther.Wind.Weather.
25 7 p. m. .. 30.13 43 W Clear
26 7 a. m. .. 30.13 38 W Cldy
Mean temperature, Oct 26, 44.
Highest. 48.
Lowest, 40.
Lowest last night. 34.
FREJD Z. GOSEWISCH,
Observer.
-C'
:?£&}
LY GATE
THE AH
ARB SWEEPING
GERMANS BACK
(Continued from page l.i
tlon wrought by French guns. French
aviators had ertablished the fact that
many German batteries of the Ver
dun front consisted of a sin^V. gun
and others of only two or three.
Since the inauguartion of the allies'
Somme offensive, the only Gem ii
reinforcements sent to that battle
field were drawn from Verdun. This
last source of supply has now been
cut oft, in the opinion of French oni
cers.
The French Verdun offensive Is
backed with more organization and
preparation than preceded the Somme
offensive. Both offensives, proceed
ing simultaneously,* are calculated to
crumple the entire German front.
Approaching Verdun Sunday, on the
second day of the artillery prepara
tion, we reached Soullly. A moment
later, a bugler sounded the alarm.
Two German aeroplanes, flying at in
visible altitudes, had succeeded in
crossing the French lines.
The streets were filled with girls
dressed In, white and white ribboned
boys, going to their first communion.
They scurried into cellars udtil
French planes appeared and drove
the Germans back over their own
lines.
Enroute from Souilly to Verdun the
roar of French artillery preparation
increased steadily. The aerial activ
ity assumed proportions I had not
witnessed before even on the Somme
front. German anti-air craft guni
kept the entire sky throughout the
shells, executing a veritable barrage
against the airmen for the double
purpose of driving them back and
obscuring their observation.
On Sunday evening the Germans,
fearing an immediate attack, launch
ed a terrific barrage, using 300 guns.
On Monday the French resumed their
preparation. At the height of the
bom}*:rdment a 400 millimeter calibre
shell r,truck In the center of Douau
mont. The explosion was visible on
the entire front and flames burst
forth from three sides
On Monday night, French officers
reported, more than 100 Germans and
three officers deserted and surrender
ed to the French rather than face the
impending attack. They are said to
have given up valuable information.
On Tuesday, the French resumed
the bombardment more violently than
ever. Half in hour before the at
tack was begun we visited Verdun
and were shown the operations of
the machinery of the vast subterra
nean city with its water and electric
plants, bakeries, and even printing
presses operating In their usual
methodical manner. The garrison
theatre even had a performance
scheduled for that evening though all
the soldiers knew and were elated at
the prospect tliat they were about to
begin a great offensive, after eight
months of defensive fighting.
A French general, speaking In Eng
lish, drank a toast to. America, which
in declared 4o be the greatest stick
Hr for the rights of humanity. He
proudly showed a laurel wreath sent
the heroic defenders of Verdun by
two Americans, the Baroness Muro
and Mrs. Diefenthaler, both of New
Canaan, Connecticut.
Shelling Trenches.
LONDON, Oct. 26.—The Germans
heavily shelled British trenches
north of the Somme last night be
tween Eau Court L'Abbaye and Les
Bouefes atid also In the neighbor
hood of Stuff and Hohenzollern re
doubts, General Halg reported this
afternoon.
British detachments successfully
raided enemy trenches near Monchy
and also northeast of Arras, doing
considerable damage and taking some
prisoners.
Crown Prince Wins.
BERLIN, Oct. 26. (Via wireless to
Sayville, L. I.)—The crown prince's
troops have repulsed violent French
attacks against Fort Vaux, northeast
of Verdun, said an official statement
this afternoon, admitting the loss of
Fort Douaumont and the village of
Douaumont.
Bombardment Last Night.
PARIS, Oct. 26.—Artillery bom
bardment continued throughout last
night on the Vaux sector northeast of
Verdun, but the Germans made no
new counter attacks, It was officially
announced today.
GREATEST BRIDGE
IN EUROPE
(Continued from page 1)
ia's fear of a German sweep toward
Bucharest
The German statement claimed fur
ther progress in the Dobrudja opera
tions. but mentioned no fresh cajj
tures. It apparently corroborated the
Petrograd statement that Macken
sen's offensive is slackening. A de
layed official statement from the Bul
garian war office announced the cap
ture of a huge amount of booty at
Constanza, but claimed no further
victories.
On the Translyvanian front, the
Rumanians have arrested the pro
gress or Falkenhayn's armies at sev
eral points, though yielding ground In
the Jlul valley and north of Sinala, in
which direction the Germans made
some progress.
In the house of commons this af
ternoon Premier Asquith gave further
assurance tliat the allies were direct
ing their anxious attention to the Ru
manian situation. He said that con
certed action is being arranged and
that France, Russia and Italy, as well
as England, are taking every possible
step to relieve the Rumanians.
The last twenty-four hours of fight
ing on the Somme and Verdun fronts
have left the situation very unchanged.
The German war office this afternoon
BELL-ANS
Absolutely Removes
Indigestion. One package
proves it 25c at all druggists.
11 fi-Vf
ilrtV
I
'.^: 'Xi
•^•v- re* v\
Late Market
Chicago Estimates for Tomorrow.
[Furnished by Long Commission Co.,
403 Main. Telephone No. 100.]
Hogs, 27,000 cattle, 6,000 sheep,
13,000 wheat, 92 corn, 86 oata, 329.
Liverpool Close.
Wheat, [email protected] up corn, unchanged.
Clearances.
•Wheat and flour, 380,000 corn,
175,000 oats, 1,000.
Northwest Wheat Receipts.
Minneapolis, 481 cars Duluth, 61
cars Winnipeg, 548 cars.
Chicago Cash Grain.
CHICAGO, Oct.
red, $1.79%@1.80% No. 3 red.
$1.7216 @1.80 No. 2 hard, [email protected]
1.85 No. 3 hard, $1.77%@1.83 No. 3
spring. [email protected]%.
Corn—No. "2 yellow, $1.08 @1.09%
No. 3 yellow, [email protected] No. 6 yel
low, $1.04 No. 2 white, $1.07%®
1.08 No. 3 white, $1.04 No. 2 mixed,
$1.07%@1.08% No. 3 mixed, [email protected]
1.08 No. 5 mixed, $1.05.
Oats—Nd. 4 white, [email protected]%c
standard, 52%@53%c.
St. Louis Cash Grain.
[Furnished by Long Commission Co.,
403 Main. Telephone No. 100.]
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Oct. 26.—Wheat
No. 2 red, new, $1.82®1.90 No. 3
day flecked with white shrapnel and ired, new. [email protected] No. 2 hard, old,
the puffs from black, high explosive $1.80®1.92%.
Corn—No. 7, $1.03®1.03% No. 2
white, $1.04.
Oats—No. 2, 52c No. 3, [email protected]%o
standard, [email protected]%c No. 3 white, 53
@53%c No. 4 whife, &[email protected]%c.
Kansas City Cash Grain.
Kansas City Cash Grain. 'ss^flllOOO
[Furnished by Long Commission Co., $5-Z5®™««
403 Main. Telephone No. 100.]
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 26—Wheat
No. 2 hard, new, [email protected] No. 3
hard, new, [email protected] No. 4 hard,
new, $1.75 No. 2 red, new, $1.78®
of the fort 1.85 No. 3 red, new, [email protected] No.
4 red, new, [email protected]
Corn—No. 2, 96® 98c No. 3, 96::
No. 4, [email protected] No. 2 yellow, [email protected]
No. 3 yellow, [email protected] No. 4 yellow.
[email protected] No. 3 white, $1 [email protected]:
No. 3 white, [email protected] No. 4 white, 96
@97c.
Oats—No. 2, [email protected]%c No. 3, [email protected]
white, 53%@54c No. 3
50%c No. 2
white, 53%c No. 4 white, [email protected]%c.
Peoria Grain.
PEORIA, 111., Oct
Oats—Market [email protected]%c lower. No.
white, 52c standard, [email protected]%c.
Cattle receipts 9,500
steady to weait top $11.65.
Sheep receipts 23,000
strong, 10c up top $8.25.
top $10.65.
OATS—
Dec
May
PORK—
Jan
Dec
26.—Corn—Mar­
ket lc higher. No. 3 white, No. 3
yellow, No. 4 mixed, $1.04% No. ,6
white. No. 6 mixed, $1.03% No. 2
yellow. No. 3 mixed, $1.05 No. 5
yellow, $1.03% No. 5 mixed, $1.03%
@1.04.
3
Chicago Live Stock—Close.
[Furnished by Long Commission Co.,
403 Main. Telephone No. 100.]
CHICAGO, Oct 26.—Hoe receipts
36,000 market slow, i0c lower.
Mixed and butchers, $9.70®
10.35
good heavy, [email protected] rough
heavy, [email protected] light,
10.25.
market slow, weak, 5c lo
good heavy, [email protected] rougn $5-J5-
DfesVyt7*"95®?69595:
1Ight'
and heifers.
and feeders, [email protected]
@8.15 calves, [email protected] westerns,
[email protected]
•Sheep receipts 23,000 market 10c
higher. Native, $7.00 @7.80 western.
,[email protected] lambs, [email protected] west
ern, $8.75® 10.65.
Omaha Live Stock.
OMAHA, Oct. 26.—Cattle receipts
9,600 market slow, 10c lower. Steers
[email protected] cows and heifers, $4.25
@7.25 stockers and feeders, $6.00®
8.00 calves, $8.00®10.00
stags, [email protected]
admitted the lo«*'of Fort .douaumont
and Douaumont village to the French,
but reported the repulse of violent
French attacks against Fort Vaux yes
terday. Berlin also claimed the re
pulse of heavy Russian attacks on the
front west of Lutzk fortress.
In Macedonia, French and Serbian
troops drove northward in a fresh
victory Tuesday, capturing two vil
lages and other German-Bulgarian po
sitions.
Escaped Across Bridge.
BERLIN (via wireless to Sayville).
Oct. 26.—Part of the Russo-Rumanlan
force in Dobrudja escaped into old Ru
mania by fleeing across the Cerna
voda bridge before the town was cap-
voda bridge Deiore tne lown cap-
of the semi-official news agency report
ed today.
"By the capture of Cernavoda, Field
Marshal Mackensen's army completely
turned the military situation in Dob
rudja In our favor," he asserted.
"The flying Russians and Ruman
ians separated into two parts, those
who did not remain on the battle field
or were not captured, saved themselves
ty flight over the Danube bridge at
Cernavoda or to northern DoBrudja.
"After the capture of
30%
Cernavoda.
this famous Danube bridge, the largest
don,°*ted
47
"After the fall of the Constanza-Cer-
navoda line, the transportation of pro- prices, merchants said.
visions from Russia must now be con-
ducted on two minor and less efficient
railway lines in Moldavia or via the
Danube ports of Galatz and Brailau,
31c.
market
market
Chicago Live Stock.
CHICAGO, Oct. 26.—Hog
3C.000,
Mixed and butchers, [email protected]
receipts
which cannot be compared with Con-|the Chicago Woman's club
stanza. down-town property recently,
"Rumania's military situation durine
the last two days has become much
more critical, especially since the Ger
mans and Austro-Hungarlans have al
ready partly conquered the Carpathian
passes."
A.y DAILY RANGE OF PRICES.
rFuxnlahed by Lohg Commission Co., 403 Main. Telephone No. loo.]
CHICAGO, Oct. 26.— Llose—
•WHEAT—
Dec
May
July
Open.
High.
1.83%
1.83.%'
1.47
1.79-1.79%
1.79-1.80
1.45-1.45%
CORN—
Dec
May
July
.. 87%-8«f%
.. 88%~89%
.. 89%-89%
63%«4
26.35
2 6 8 0
IiA!RD—
26.—Wheat—No.
2
Jan
Dec
EilBS—
Jan.
Oot
14.12
14.67
.... 14.07-10
,... 14-. 40-67
Hog receipts 6,700 market [email protected]
lower Bulk. [email protected] top $10-05.
Sheep receipts 13 000 marketi®
15c higher. Yearlings, [email protected],
wethers, [email protected] lambs, [email protected]
10.65 ewes, [email protected]
Kansas City Live Stcck.
KANSAS CITY, Oct. 26.—Cattle re
celpte 4,000 market steady. Steers.
[email protected]
cows and helfera.*4-^
(3)9.25 stockers and feeders, $5.75®
8.25 calves, [email protected]
Hog receipts 10,000 market 5c
lower. Bulk, [email protected] heavy,
[email protected] medium, [email protected],
light, [email protected]
Sheep receipts 9,000 market
strong, 10c higher. Lambs, $9.75®
10.50 ewes, [email protected] wethers.
St. Louis Live Stock.
BAST ST. LOUIS, Oct. 26.—Cattle
receipts 8,000 market steady. Texas
receipts 1,100 native beef steers,
[email protected] yearling steers and
heifers, $8.50011.15 cows, $5.50®
7 75* stockers and feeders, |[email protected],
calves, $6.00 @10.75 Texas steers,
[email protected] cows and heifers, $4.50®
7 50
Hog receipts 9.000 market 10c Jtow
er. Mixed and butchers. [email protected]).40,
good to heavy, [email protected]
19.66®9.90 light,
Cheese—Twins, 19%®20c Young
Americas, 20^[email protected]%c.
Potatoes—Receipts 47 cars fancy
westerns. $1.7001.80 Wisconsins.
[email protected] early Ohioa, $1.60®
1.70
per bushel.
Live poultry—Fowls, 17c ducks,
roueh -^@15c geese,
12S14c
$9 70® chickens, 17%c turkeys, 15®30c.
teatj
bulls and
spring
New York Produce.
NEW YORK. Oct. 26.—Flour mar-
ket
unsettled, nominal.
Lambs,
MeeB, $31.00®
Pork market firm.
32.00.
•Lard market easier. Middle west
spot, $16.30® 16.40.
Suear. raw, market firm. Centrlfu-
jg.52 Muscavado 89 test,
ftrTn
.S9-75®10-35' ^af^s".^1 crushed, $8.50 powdered,
Cattle' receipts 9,500 market *7-6°i_ granulated^ $7^50®7.€5.]
steady. Beeves, $6.60®11.65 cows
cut
Coffee Rio No. 7 on spot 9%«
Tallow market firmer. City, 10c
wcU 10*c
Hay market weak. Prime, $1.00 No.
S, [email protected]%c clover, [email protected]
Dressed poultry market quiet. Tur
keys, [email protected] chickens, [email protected]
fowls, [email protected]%c ducks, 24c.
Live poultry market dull. Geese,
14c ducks, [email protected] foWTs. [email protected]
turkeys, 20c roosters, 13%c chick
ens, [email protected]
Cheese market firm. State milk
common to special, l8%@21%c
skims, common to specials, 10®lS^c.
Butter market firm. Receipts 9,243.
Will Resume His Campaign.
[United Press Leased Wire Service.]
ST. JOSEPH, Mo., Oct 20—"Delay
In trial of my case will not prevent my
re-election," declared Oscar D. McDan
iel, prosecuting attorney and candidate
to succeed himself, after Judge Ryan
had set the trial for November 6, the
first day of the regular November term
of court. McDaniel declared he be
lieves the fact that the charge of wife
murder will still be pending against
him on election day, will have no ef
fect on his chances for re-election. He
plans to resume his campaign.
the yeteran
the for
One Ray of Sunshine.
j£,
^reduced^tht^d^and and*1 the
Buildings Torn Down.
[United PresB Leased Wire Service.]
CHICAGO, Oct. 26.—Members of
bought
expect-
^:.'' "'V' V'-?: ,v'^
THXTEtSDAT, OCT. 26
Low.
1.78
1.77%
1,43
88
89%
8994
86%
13.77
14.40
r(
.65,
Sheep receipts
n8j».
[email protected]
bulk,
[email protected] bulk, $10.00®
10.35
1,500 market
steady. Ewes," [email protected] yearlings,
$8.00 @8.75 lambs, $7.00 @10.65.
Chicago Produce.
CHICAGO, Oct 26.—Butter—Extras
'34%c firsts, 33%@34c dairy extras
32%@33c da'ry firsts, [email protected]
Eggs—Ordinary firsts, 28%@29%c
firsts,
191#
•w:: Oct- -26.
1.80!%-%
Y, 1.80%-%
x.45%-46
Oct 25,1
1.80-ti
1.8(41
•f 88
,88 OOOOQO
54%
57%
.. 5T%-57%
63
26.50
£6.90
.... 15.05-07
.... 15.65-70
25.87
26.50
15.12
15.72
14.85
15.62
86%J|
v-Ttft 53%!
57%
'66%
Mule quotations:
16 to 16% hands [email protected]|
lo to 15% hands.. [email protected]
14 to 14% hands 6001*1
13 to 13% hands 45® 95
Plugs 26® Ti|
St. Louis Hay and Straw.
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Oct. 25.—Hay-1
Inspections totalled 37 cars (14 oal
the.west side and 23 on the east!
side) and included 11 timothy, 121
clover mixed, 2 prairie, 2 clover and I
10 alfalfa. Timothy and light clovetj
mixed of good No. 2 and No. 1 ijual
ity sold readily at firm prices
mon grades were slow and weak. I
Heavy clover mixed and clover were
In urgent request, strong and buoy
ant, and available supply of good No.
2 and better was not sufficient to 1
supply wants thereof. Alfalfa scarce
requirements remain unsupplled all
grades bought by mills and feeders
and salable at premium prices.
Clover mixed, No. 2 at $13 to
$13.50 No. 1 at $13.50 to $15.
Timothy, No. 3 at $10 to $11: No.
2 at $12 to $13.50 No. 1 at $14.56
to $15.50.
Alfalfa, No. 2 at $14 No. 1 at
$19.50.
clover. No. 1 at $15.50 to $16 No
2 at $12 to $13.50.
Straw, scarce. In demand and
strong. Oats at $8 to $8.50. Wheat
$8.50. Rye, $8.
FELL FROM LOFT,
iT: THEN WELL
How a Man Who Landed On Wcod
Pile And Was Sore From
Head to Foot Found
Gordon Out of Game. let of Wendel Depot. Mass., climbfd
[United Press Leased Wire Service.] up into a loft to get some building
CHICAGO, Oct. 26.—Kitty Gordon, material, just aB many another nian
of an Injury received in scrimmage
last night. A ligament in his side
which was torn last season, was
again injured.
IKegr
1
iK
D&
I
DS
S7*3III1
25.92
26.60
26.«S
I
(1
ICOR
14.92,
15.67
15.2
15.80
13.85
14.40
14.20 I
14.
I
Creamery extras, 36c dairy tubs, 2jal
35c imitation creamery firsts,
Six months, 3%@3% percent
Mercantile paper, 3% percent
Bar silver London, 32 %d.
Bar silver New York, 67%c.
Demand sterling, $4.75%.
St. Louis Horses and Mulet.
ST. LOUIS, Mo.. Oct. 25.—Horwi|
—Buying for the United States gor.j
ernment artillery service was a (»j
ture. Other inspections working
were: British, ,French, Italian
Belgian, not enough material
available to meet the inquiry. Owtajl
to the needs of Europe, the outlet ia|
broadening and heavier runs an]
needed.
Horses consigned for the natinl
trade bring satisfactory prices. S&lal
of auction sorts totaled 350 heatl
Trade/from east was of little conn-]
quence.
Horse quotations:
Heavy draft, extra $175023
Eastern chunks [email protected] I
Southern horses, good
Southern horses, plain
Southern horses, common.. 40® $1
Choice saddlers 100® 2M]
Plugs 5® 251
Mules—Only the best of quality, 'at]
and finished mules sold well, folio*
lng another tr cessive run. There art]
too many on hand, and the tendency
is for a draggy embarrassed trade.!
Prices on prLne grades were steady. I
On stock without quality and finish!
there was not enough demand to du|
termine a range of prices.
|Bod3
1
31c.
•Egg market quiet. Receipts 3,Sjji
Nearby white fancy, 66® 62c neartjl
mixed fancy, [email protected] fresh, [email protected](o&J
New York Money Market
NEW YORK, Oct. 26.—Money oa]
call, 2% percent.
Quick Relief. 1
Once upon a time Edwin PutntP,
who lives in the quiet, pretty ham-
Maroon half-back, is out living in the country must often do.
S°°^ today because Suddenly he slipped and fell. Tea
feet below was a pile of wood, knot-1|
ted and gnarled. It was a nasty
tumble, and Mr. Putnam was inJur®®
painfully In the back, he was
covered
with bruises, and was sore from heafl
to foot.
The next day he bought a bottle
cf Sloan's Liniment which had been
recommended to him. Within a very
[United Press Leased Wire Service.]
ST. PAUL. Minn.. Oct. 26.—With
good steak selling for forty cents a ....
pound, flour selling for $10 a barrel, hours"the'soreness 'had''vanished
coal soaring alove $11 a ton in the. and the lameness had disappeared,
'I below weather approach* He was an active tnitn once more,
clothing merchants today Sloan's Liniment can be obtained
some Joy. The price of at all drug stores, 25c, 50c and $10®-
sSlpans
Liniment
rt/LLS,
ing the Income to clear the Indebted
ness of the club. Today workmen
were tearing down the buildings.
"They are unfit for habitation,"
Miss Grace E. Temple, chairman.,
aaid today. "We stand for good' —Subscribe for The Oete City.
housing and would rather lose the
rent than permit people to occupy
such places."

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