OCR Interpretation


The daily Gate City and constitution-Democrat. (Keokuk, Iowa) 1916-1922, May 28, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057262/1918-05-28/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

IN?
ino
MAT 28, ISIS
Various
LUVvll&D
ut a few drops on a touchy
corn, then lift corn out
with fingers
(oor high heels have put corns on
toes and calluses on the bottom
ar feet, but why care now?
lor a few cents you can get a quar
1 ounce of the magic drug freezone
fently discovered by a Cincinatti
lius.
Ipply a few drops upon a tender,
pg corn and instantly, yes im
liately, all soreness disappears
shortly you will find the corn so
le that you can lift it out, root and
with the fingers.
st think! Not one bit of pain be
applying freezone or afterwards,
loesn't even irritate the surround
1 skin.
|ard corns, soft corns or corns be
en the toes, also hardened callus
Ion bottom of feet Just seem to
pvel up and fall off without hurt
a particle. It is almost magical.
Is a compound made from ether
a well known druggist here.
|longWHted
jjUj^pMinniiiHiiiHuimimmimmiimmimimiiiiiiHimiiimiiHiimte..
Millinery
forDe
The New Rough Sailors
Black—White Red —Purple
iMHmiimimNiiraiiHNiiiiiimnHimmmimnnimuiiim
ffigjgv
Colored
$100
U4
Ifr.
IgWfiJ
Better Ones $1.50,$2.50,$3.50 and $5.00
New Trimmed Leghorns 1
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii niiiiiiiiiiiiiiim iiinniiiiiiiiiiiii tniiiiiiiniiitiiii
Black Leghorns with white crowns trimmed wtih
patent leather and various combinations, all at
WHITE1 WITH OLD ROSE CROWNS
WHITE WITH BELGIAN BLUE CROWN'S
WHITE WITH GRAY CROWNS
AH banded around the edges with same color as
crowns and trimmed with flowers, only EE
$5.00
I 111111X7'C New, Big Dept. Store
SAVES WOMEN
FROM TORTURE
602—604 Main Street
must walk
a
as
Dont
viS°r°aa
laids the organs of the body in
forming their functions.
Til diseases whether of a malig
or weak character, tend to tear
our vitality. You must coun
|ct disease in its incipient stage
UVe a bappy and
use"
3LD MEDAL Haarlem Oil Cap
Haarlem Oil
Is'a -OO-year-old preparation that
Ib n^I °T#r Vth® *rorld- contains
ining oils combined with strength
|ng and system-cleaning herbs
capsules area prescription and
been ajid are still being used by
I icians in daily practice. They
hJSrSJ**
merit ,n
I
relieving
,"65
and bladder
c°m-
ibtL? aliments arising from
^LD8itfvn*TC
acid in tlle
system.
LD MEDAL Haarlem Oil Cap
are sold at all reliable drug
bSe««arf
gUa,ranteed
t0 do
ed or
m°ney
re-
be misled by false
4ed.
|eveT box.°0k
f°r
in gttot
GOLD MEDAL
HER STATES
SON'S CASE
Frorn
In Front of
Theatre by Mistake and
Youth Afraid to
Return.
da£er.(t ^Tence Hedrick,
with
STrPerior
court, Mon-
«r- *al°ed at
a
concealed
1116
information
tylky"'
"^wrence
SatJL*
08
from near the
[ttelSrtol thinking it
fhe rfrvw-
After
going out
P** iWd iK?* *°und out his
^^-id to return.
®nd called
^70ra» *ho sent him to the
35
vy
ss
jj|
S
SCHOOLS HELP
MEMORIAL DAY
Soya and Girl, who Will Aid Women
Committees are Named—Hours
of Reporting As
signed.
Boys of the high school who are to
assist the women in decorating the
graves of the soldiers who have been
buried in Oakland cemetery, will meet
at the cemetery gate at 10 a. m.. May
30. The boys are: Myron Davis, Roy
Happs, Oren Wood. Leo Kesselring.
Carl Pflug and Rugh Montgomery.
The following are names of the
flower committees of the various pub
lic schools 'to assist in decoration of
the soldiers' graves in the afternoon
of Memorial day. They will meet in
the G. A. R. hall, Eighth and Main
streets at 2 p. m., May 30:
George Washington school—Mabel
Reiser, Blanche Miller, Iioretta Roost,
George Well. McDill Ayer, Junius
Phillips, Willard Sutlive.
Gariield school—Vivian Foulkes,
Grance Henke, Elizabeth Leffingwell,
Hazel Rulon, Alice May Seibert, May
Tooke, Deslie Lewis, Tommy Guy.
Wells school—Morris Dimond, Har
old Peterson, Max Schultz. Helen
Barnes, Anna Stanton, Lorine Bever
ing. Grace Russell.
oli|Iow.
.they
|ALK ERECT
AT EIGHTY SwSKSS!
Torrence school—Edward Reich-
with I Lincoln school—Delmar Wharton.
son. Ethelyn Matthes, Louisa Bode. at 9 a. m. High mass will be cele-
Raymond Bckland. Arthur Welch,
iirt« tiL twenty if Raymond Meyer, Annabelle Ewing,
Winona Washburn, Pearl Whittaker.
Carey school—Walter Leake, Quen
t.in Fonlkes, Roy Grout. Joy Grout.
Helen Haubert, Mildred Alvis, Alice
Haggerty.
Jefferson school—Rella Gammon,
Frances Wright., Elsie Swanson,
Mabel Hendershot. Senton Powell,
Earl Elting and John Stahl.
UNITARIANS IN
ANNUAL SESSION
Membership and Finances in Pros
perous Condition—No Regu
lar Services During
the War.
Reports made at the annual meet
ing of the congregation of the Unitar
ian church, Monday night showed the
church to be in prosperous condition
both as to membership and finances.
Arrangements were made at the meet
ing to liquidate a church debt As
the church is without a pastor, it was
decided that the congregation would
have no regular services during the
period of the war.
All the officers and trustees of the
church Were re-elected. Asaph Buck
was re-elected president of the board
of trustees George A. Has
sail, sec
retary, and A. J. Dimorad, treasurer.
The other trustees who will serve are
George S. Tucker, J. F. Elder and A.
E. Connable.
Italians on Offensive.
[United Press Leased Wire Service.]
ROME. May 28.—Italian troops
broke through successive enemy de
fenses near Capsolie to the depth of
seven hunderd and fifty meters Sun
day night, the Italian war office an
nounced today.
Considerable losses were inflicted
on the enemy and 440 prisoners, four
trench mortars and .ten. machine
guns were taken.
CIIT SUFFERS IK.
STORM OF NI6HI
y-
Several Place* Struck by Lightning
Wind Causes Damage—Wire
Service Hurt,
Tbow
RIVERS 'RUNNING HIGH
Mississippi and Des Moines Up Sev
eral Feet Over Night—War Gar
dens Laid Flat by the
Elements.
Telephone, telegraph and electric
service was paralyzed, temporarily,
foundations crumbled, war gardens
were blown flat and crops were dam
aged in some instances beyond repair
in the fierce rain and electric storm
which struck the city at 6:50 p. m.
Monday.
anH MAila*n
$5.00 jj=j
no
.v^
marshal. He r~t the marshal to
bring him back to the police station
in Keokuk, where trouble was settled
with the owner of the car, satisfac
torily."
A cupola on St Joseph's hospital be
tween Exchange and Johnson streets
on South Fourteenth street, was been the organization having special
struck by lightning and a large hole charge of the day. It has for the past
made in the roof. The flash injured few years heen a matter of pathetic
one. 'regret to note the thinned ranks of
The damage to the hospital is cover-1 nnen in blue vho march on Mem
ed bv insurance lorJaJ
—,
River Rises Rapidly.
The mouth of the Des Moines is
like a mill race.
The Mississippi was reported to be
rising rapidly. At 7 a. m., today, it
was 12.2 feet two hours later it was
thirteen feet in stage.
The slate roof on a house owned by
a family named Monks, near Mooar
Station, was blown off during the
night storm.
The foundation of a house near
Tenth and Pulton streets crumbled.
Wire Companies Hit.
The Bell Telephone company had
trouble with its lines and linemen
were kept busy making repairs to
day. Telegraph companies reported
delays in service occasioned by the
high winds and lightning strokes.
Railroad service was slightly im
paired.
Metals Dynamo Hit.
Lightning struck a wire leading to
the Electro Metals company plant on
street, last night and affected the
current used by the plant for some
time. Electricians from the Mississ
ippi River Power company were
called upon to help repair the dam
age.
ST. PETERS TO
HAVE SERVICE
President's
daily
Proclamation to be
Noted, Thursday in
High Mass at
at 9 a.
forated.
Dorothy Ponins! Hili P.l.r!''"1,"'
Spe-
Church.
Club. W. L. Pet
|New York 23 10 .697
Chicago 11 .667
17 .541
TODAY'S GAMES.
National League.
Cincinnati in Chicago.
Boston in Pittsburgh
American League.
Chicago in Boston.
St Louis in Philadelphia.
Detroit in Washington.
Cleveland in New York.
YESTERDAY'S SCORES.
National League.
Philadelphia 2 Cincinnati
New York 3 Chicago 7.
Boston 2: Pittsburgh l.
Brooklyn 1 St. Louis 0.
American League.
Detroit 4 Washington 7.
St Louis 4 Philadelphia 8.
.Chicago 6: Boston 4.
Cleveland 1 New York 2,
According to the proclamation of man. Mr. and Mrs. Hiller will arrive
President Wilson, Thursday, May 30, in Keoituk tomorow foT a short cisit
has been set aside as a day of prayer with Mr. Hillcr's sister, Mrs. Anzm
CLUB STANDINGS
National League.
Pittsburg 20 17 .541
Philadelphia ..... 14 18 .438
19 .424
St Louis 12 21 .364
Brooklyn 12 21 .364
American League.
Club W .L. Pet.
21 13 •§18
New York 14 .576
Chicago 15 14 .517
St Louis 16 25 .516
17 .514
Philadelphia 17 .453
19 .441
18 .333
THE DAILY GATE CITY
[For Society Editor call 515.]
MEMORIAL DAY.
There dawns no holler, day than, this,
The very air
Breathes out a prayer
As sacred as a mother's kiss.
If as I feel
Ed act, I'd kneel.
My father was a soldier.
'T would seem, I thinV, to one who
gave
This day to sport
Of any sort
Like trampling on his father's grave.
I'd feel it so
But then, you know.
My father was a soldier.
—W. B. Norton.
First Memorial Oay.
With the approach of Memorial day
it is interesting to recall that it was
a Virginia woman, Mrs. James Red
path, who arranged the program for
the first Memorial day at which the
graves of all soldiers, whether union
or confederate, were' decorated. This
was in 1867. As early as 1865 and '66
the southern women decorated Che
(graves of their own fallen men and
the northern women did the same,
At that time the day was known as
Decoration day." In 1868 General
Two and a half Inches of rain fell,
inundating gardens, flooding streets jofan^^I^ganf' then" oonmandcir "in
A«1
and cellars throughout the city and
causing the river to rise two and a
half feet.
The usual June rise in the Missis
sippi was moved ahead by several
weeks.
Hospital Struck.
chief of the Grand Army of the Re
public, fixed 'May 30th as Memorial
day. Since that time the day has
been nationally observed, although
there has been no federal legislation
making it a national holiday. The
observance of the day was until 1868
a work of love done by .the women of
the north and south. Since 1868 the
Grand Army of the Republic has
day-
and
Both the Mississippi and Des Moines another decade this Grand Army of
rivers are flooding the lowlands he- ^Public must inevitably pass
away since its membership is re
stricted to those who served in the
civil war. That Keokuk's G. A. It
post is No. 2 in the order, makes Oris
city have special interest and pride
in, it Very recently a circular has
been sent out from McCook Post G.
low Keokuk today and Sugar Creek is
said to be running out of its banks in
places.
to know that before
'the Republic must inevitably pass
A. ft. at Iola, Kansas, advocating
that the laws of the order be chang
ed to admit into membership in the
G. A. R. all sailors and soldiers of
any war of the United States. The
aim is to perpetuate the G. A. R-, the
name being already sufficiently com
prehensive to include even the sol
diers now fighting in France or en-*
listed for service. If this carries, it
would enable some of the boys who
went to Camp Dodge this morning
to belong to the order to which their
fathers earned membership by gal
lant service in the civil war.
Red Cros?s Changes.
The Y. W. C, A. building will be
closed Thursday because of Memorial
day, and there will be no meetings for
work at the Red Cross shop that' day.
Those interested will please note the
following changes in days of meeting:
The ladies of the First Baptist auxili
ary will meet Wednesday afternoon,
the United Presbyterian auxiliary will
meet Friday afternoon and the sewing
instructors will meet Wednesday
morning.
Miss Schepers Weds.
This morning at 8 o'clock in the St.
Francis de Sales church in St. Paul,
Minn., occurred the marriage of Miss'
May Schepers, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Schepers of St. Paul, to
Mr. Clem Hiller, formerly of Keokuk.
The ceremony was performed by the
Rev. Father Bayer of Dubuque, cousin
of teh bride. Miss Elizabeth Laurin
son of Keokuk, a niece of the groom,
was bridesmaid and Mr. John ghep
ers, the bride's brother, served as best
Laurinson, 1006 Concert St.
CITY NEWS.
—Keokuk has been a model town for
the last thirty-six hours. There have
been no arrests made by the police in
that time.
—Joseph B. Code, a Keokuk boy at
tending St. Ambrose college, Daven
port. Iowa, won first place in the
chapel of Westminster Presbyterian
church. Thursday at 10 a. m., thit the
service will take place in the main
auditorium of the church. A special
invitaton is beng extended to all per
sons havng men in service overseas or
I in home camps to attend the worship
hour. This is to be a union service of
all churches.
—A daughter was born to Mr. and
Mrs. Alfred Triplett of 1521 Concert
street May 27. The baby's name is
Caroline Helen Triplett
—A hand writing expert, if he vol
unteered his services, could find
plenty to do at the city hall for the
nexTfew days" A letter addressed"to if^Po^ons
"The Maire and City Board" is puz
zlin# councilmen. They can mak*
neither head nor tail of it Council
man Di J. Hemmy confesses to sit
ting up nights trying to decipher the
ten-page message. Apparently it is
from a descendant of Davey Crockett
or some other historical character as
SCOUTS TO SAVE
HANCOCK BERRIES
Go on a
Boy Troopers of Keokuk
Three or Four Weeks Outing,
Sunday, With War Pur
pose In View.
APPEAL MADE TO THEMj
Older Men Take Charge -of Lads Who
Will Earn Money WWIe Help,
tag Conserve Food
Crop.
Hancock county, Hllnols, farmers
have appealed to Keoknk boy scouts
to help save the strawberry crop and
the call has been heeded.
Thirty or forty members of scout
troops here will leav© for their an
nual outing, four and a half miles
above Hamilton, Sunday, and during
their absence of three or four weeks
from the city, will help gather in the
luscious berries that would other
wise go to waste.
Earn and Serve.
B. G. Weisman, scxrat commission
er, saki today flrat the boys will earn
money during their vacation and be
performing a war service at the same
time.
Mr. Weisman and several scout
masters will accompany the boys..
The scoutmasters will take turns re
maining in Illinois to guide the activ
ities at the troops. George C. Mon
tague, Hubert Hopp, Arthur Lumberg
and Rtoy Bartholomew will take
charge from time to time.
The scouts will pitch camp on a
bluff and take their own cook along.
SUMNER GIVES
BOARD PRAISE
Health Officials of Keokuk Commend
ed on Social Disease Work
—U. SI Man to Come
Here.
Personal congratulations from Dr.
G. H. Sumner, secretary to the state
board of health were sent to the Keo
kuk board of health today because of
the manner in which the social dis
ease campaign here has been conduct
ed.
Dr. Simmer said in the course of his
letter that a representative of the
United States public health service
would be in Keokuk and vicinity some
time soon to give what ever aid may
be needed to the Keolrak authorities
in handling disease cases.
Upon receipt of the letter, -Mayor
Ed S. Lofton said: "AH of these mat
ters pertaining to social disease have
been strictly under supervision of the
board of health. While we have had
valuable assistance from state repre
sentatives, all matters having to do
with enforcement of the state board
of health regulations as they relate to
these matters, shall be under orders
and direction of the board here."
OFF TO THE RACES.
Our two trucks will leave from the
corner of Sixth and Main S^. at 12:30
Decoration day for the auto races at
Donnellson.
JAMES CAMERON'S SONS.
CITY NEWS.
—There will be no issne of The
Daily Gate City Memorial day. "Mer
chants should arrange their advertis
ing announcements accordingly.
—Both a service flag and a U. S.
flag were dedicated at. a loyalty meet
ing which members of the Masonic
lodge held in the Masonic temple Mon
day night. The Rev. Wallace R.
Bacon, pastor of the First Christian
church, made the dedicatory address.
—Mrs. Eliza Dry has received pos
tal cards from her son, Buell Dry, who
is at Camp Meigs, Washington, D. C.,
showing a mammoth birthday cake
made for "Daddy" Miller of the Y. M.
C. A. forces at the camp. The cake
twenty-eighth annual senior elocution 'lghed ,hIrty-flvP pounds and con
tained among other things thirty-six
contest, recently. His theme was The
Black Sheep. The Keokuk student is
the son of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Code,
116 South Ninth street. There were
a large number of contestants for
speaking supremacy.
—The J. C. Brewster family of Ft
Madison has been notified of the
death by accident of Miss Sally Moore,
a niece, in Frankfort, Ind. Miss
Moore was formerly a newspaper
woman. The Brewsters have rela
tives in Keolnik.
—Contract, for supplying coal to the
city of Keokuk for the next year is to
he let at a near future meeting of the
dozen eggs, eleven and one-half
pounds of butter, twelve pounds ot
sugar and thirty pounds of flour.
"Daddy" Miller was sixty years old
and divided his big cake among the
soldiers.
—If you have an empty case, please
call 741 and we will send Tor It at
once. Coco Cola Bottling Co.
—No men who have to register June
5th will be accepted for enlistment for
the army after Friday of this week. A
communication to this effect has been
sent to the United States recruiting
office in Keokuk from recruiting head-
city council. Tv,^«n~,r+
—Announcement was made this aft-1 xTonHetf?%v,
ernoon that instead of having a serv
11 _m ., 1 11 iitn 11n», »-. I ft divorcc from npt uitiS'Dftnu, d• rruiK
flee of prayer and humiliation in the
jTTry. in the district court, today.
I Drunkenness, desertion and cruel and
inhuman treatment were assigned as
reasons for asking leeal separation.
NO PAPER MEMORIAL DAY.
There will be no issue of The Daily
Gate City Thursday, May 30th, Me
morial day.
Dally Stock Letter.
[United Press Leased Wire Service.]
NEW YORK. May 28.—The New
York Bvening Sun financial review
today said:
Successive selling waves of active
carried
pric^ of.indiis-
more in stock
Sending first
Mail by
Airplane
You just read of this
incident in The
Gate City last week
or
market
while
FUNERAL NOTICE.
MUYER—Funeral services for tie
late Mrs. Kate Meyer will be held
Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock,
many dates are mentioned in the let-1
from Benevolent Union Home. Burial
ter,si^#Q Xnrivato. Friends invited.
-£r.I *wvJftv/• V-'ti•,v
j,
t,
*. t-sd. Ji-'-.
WANTED—Dishwasher at Wittlch's
restaurant, 28 South Fifth St.
WAiNTED—Maid for general house
work, no washing. Phone 1746, 6
Park Place.
WANTED—'Position in doctor's office
by a young lady with office experi
ence and a high school eduction. Care
W. M., Gate City.
WANTED—By young couple, four
room modern house, furnished with
piano. Close in. Reasonable rent Per
manent. Address B, care Gate City.
WANTED—A handy man, one who
has had carpenter experience, 35c
per hour. Keokuk Metal and Window
Strip Co. 515 Johnson.
WANTED—Young men and women
over 17 years of age, also middle
aged and elderly men and women for
good positions in Mt. Pleasant State
Hospital. Write C. F. Applegate, Supt
most of the railroad shares were
firm to strong in a quiet buying
movement. This was particularly
true of market manifestations through
the forenoon. The steel group was
weak to a degree. U. S. Steel selling
down over two points close to 102
and Laka.wanna reacting 3% to 81.
Baldwin Locomotive dropped back be
low 80. The copper stocks were most
successful in resisting pressure and
in one or two cases, there were
gains of a fraction to a point The
shipping, motor, alcohol and tobacco
shares were equally soft and Distil
lers Securities and American Sumatra
Tobacco were especially erratic, the
latter giving way over ten points at
one time and again making up a sub
stantial part of the loss.
As for the rails there was unwont
ed strength in New Haven and St.
PaaL Advances of a point or so
were numerous in that department
Evidently the supply was very re
stricted. as business was light
Industrial prices showed distinct
improvement through the afternoon.
Recoveries of one to two points were
general. Baldwin locomotive
i" /',.•? TM!VK$?
A O E
in
Appears as Belgium's world
Famous "Cardinal Mercler" In
Just at the time the German Invasion of Belgium begins, the
town in which the Cardinal Is located, Is surrounded. He Is
celebrating late mass In the Cathedral. The Germans enter and
begin their work of destruction, the dominating personality of.
this betoved Cardinal prevents destruction to the altar.
8BE HOW CARDINAL IWERC4ER OEFIES THE WON
—ALSO—
mi UP TO THE MINUTE NEW PICTORIAL EVENTS
U-Boats
Bottled
British warship
"Vindictive" leads
raid on German
submarine base.
MissKe aveny Direct fromNow
'Orchestra Hall, Chicago' Unit Orchestra and-Organ
CLASSIFIED COLUMN
WANTED.
WANT13D—Laborers wanted for day
work. River Smelting & ReAning
Co.
WANTED—Girl or elderly woman.
Enquire T224 Fulton or phone Red
408.
WANTED—Lawn mowers and all oth
er kinds of tools to sharpen. Will
call for, sharpen, and return. Call
Red 1190. John Dumenil, 1002 Pal
ean street.
WANTED—One shopman and two
trainmen. Apply at car barn at
once. Keokuk Electric Co.
WANTED—Lawn mowers to
en price 50c. Work guaranteed.
George Talley, phone Black 429.
WANTED—Lawn mowers to sharpen.
Only 60 cents. Woodbury, 1104
Main.
WANTED—At once, 10,000 doll safety
razor blades to sharpen at Wood
bury's, 1104 Main street.
WANTED—To loan money on fonrl
ture, pianos, liva atoclz, etc., on
easy payments. Strictly private.
Phone 962. Keokuk Loan Co. Over
Miller's shoe store.
SALES MEN WANTED—Several neat
appearing young men aged 18 to 45,
to travel and solicit business in rural
districts. Permanent employment,
straight salary and expenses. No cam
missions. Good men are making $20
to $40 weekly above all expenses.
Automobile furnished if you make
good. Liberal allowance for car or rig
if you now have one. Experience un
necessary but must be hustler. Write
for details. Address Sales Manager,
P. O. Box 907-R, Des Moines. Iowa.
PAGE TERES
LAST TIMES
Tonight—7,1:15, Ml-I
'Just A Woman1
A tremendous, heart interest photo,
drama, every mother, daughter, fatti
er, son in Keokuk should see this
wonderful play—Everybody more than pleased yesterday.
Tomorrow ,=*, ONE DAY ONLY
Montagu Love "The
Gross Bearer
First Picture
of the Battle
in "Picardy**
Re mar lea-fete
pictures of the
world's great strug
gle now raging
WANTED—A dining room girl at
Foster's Restaurant, 423 Main. Ap
ply at once.
WANTED—Two boy*. Steady wwt,
good wages. Apply School en'i
Bakery, Inc.
FOR RENT.
FOR RENT—Modern honse, 8X7 Or
leans, and garage. Inqnlre at &2S
Orleans. Phone 1282.
FOR RENT—3 rooms for light house
keeping. Gas, water, toilet, electric
lights. Inquire 101 N. Second St.
{TOR R33NT—Garage, good condition.
312 Morgan. Phone Red 1507.
FOR RENT—One 5 and one 6 room
house, modern except furnace. En
quire 602 Concert, Phone Red 723.
FOR SALE.
FOR SAZJ9—Five passenger, model
B-37 Buick, in good repair and ex
cellent running order, equipped with
battery, 6 tires, tools, etc^ all In
good condition. Formerly owned by
J. A. McBlroy. Call at Keoknk Serv
ice Station for inspection and demon
stration. Make your proposition to
Mr. Otto Jackson of the service sta
tion or Mrs. J. A. MoESxoqr, 3820 Pine
Grove avenue, Cfeicaguv 111.
FDR SMJB—2238 Fulton—S room
honse, lot 25x140. price for quick
sale, $&3S.-S»e El- L- Akirich.
EXDf® S&LB—<309 High, rocsn. mod'
era house, fall lot. Ideal location.
Price .$3,200. See-®. L- Aldrich.
FOR SAI3E—Steed occn, 7 baskets,
1516 corn. 80 percent germination.
Am done planting. $5j60 per to. ZW
miles northwest Monlioee, lowa»_S. IS,
Clemenson.
JFIOR SAU3—Ford roadBtee. Telephone
Red 1353^
FOR —CMS bfcycto
condition, call Red 725.
FOR SALE—Good sqoareMpfana, $20
Alexander appartm carta, T23 North
9 th. Phone B. 1330.
LOST.
LOST—CWWs white -phjne tamtam
south side. Phone -Black S654.
FOUND.
FORIWD-^ASxmt 3,4 mile eoufh -of
ilton Sunday, a lady's Jacket. Owner
/-an secure-same at Finn's grocery, IS
S. 4th St, by paying'foi~thls adver
tisement
some others-moDe-thaa made op flietr
losses. Steel recrcssed 304. The
rails moved. ra£her~ stoggisiily at the
day's toptJevels.
New York Money Karloet.
NEIW YORK, May 2ft—Money on
call. 6 per cent
Six monflis, 5 per -cent
Mercantile peeper. 6 per cent.
Bar silver, London, 48%d.
Bar silver, New York, 99%«l
Demand sterling, $4.75^47%.
Russian Peasants Uprising.
MOSCOW. May 24.—lie peasants
are reported in ah uprising through
out Ukraine. They are burning crops,
forests and machinery. Coxufitions
are particularly bad in the Holtava
district
German artillery shelled towns in
the districts of Duren, Kremtch ting.
Epriatine and Mirgorod. The inhab
itants of the latter region, however,
defeated the Germans by employing
artillery and machine guns.
Other clasnes have occurred in Kaxt
and itsa and Dchlotonocha.
i!
la good
FOR SALE—Thoroughbred Buff Qp
phington rooster, Becger strain.
Alexander appartments, 723 North
9th. Phone Black 1330k.
A
41s

xml | txt