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The daily Gate City and constitution-Democrat. (Keokuk, Iowa) 1916-1922, July 19, 1918, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057262/1918-07-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE sts
He average druggist hashandled
hundreds of medicines in his day,
some of which have long since been
forgotten.
But there is one that has been sold
ly the druggists throughout this
country, for more than fifty years,
and that is S. S. S„ the reliable blood
Drop a little Freezone on an aching
earn, inataaily that corn stops hurt
ing, you lilt it right out. It
doesn't hurt one bit. Yes, magic!
Why wait? Your druggist sella a
'Soldier at Camp Wheeler in
Georgia Pens Interesting
Letter About Tear and
Chlorine Tests
One can almost feel a gas mask
adjusted to his head and sniff the
fumes 'of tear and chlorine prepara
tions that modern warfare uses when
be reads a letter written by Ray
VanHora, former Keokuk man and a
soldier now in the 117th' Machine
"A
•above the eyes. Head bands hold it
in place.
"When using the mask all breath
ing is done through the mouth, the
air being inhaled as it comes through
the 'dope' and the soldier exhales
through a valve in the mouthpiece.
"We were instructed about the
jnethod of putting the mask on and
taking them off, for about two hours
and then we were ordered to put
them on and keep them on for one
hour.
"No one was allowed to remove
Ills mask. If he did he was placed
under arrest and sent to the guard
house for disobeying orders. With
the masks on we were marched
through woods, up hill and down
Wll. over a strange part of the!
camp, where there were no roads
Only paths. This was done so we
would get used to finding our way
about while in a gas attack.
"When the hour was about up we
arrived in a small but deep valley,
the lowest part of the camp, where
we were allowed to remove the
masks for a short time.
tv-
Good to Breathe.
"Gee! It certainly felt good to use
the nose again.
"The gas house Is a small frame
huildlng with one room, big enough
Gilcerb?
-ECKMAN5-
FOR COUGHS AND COLDS
A. hftady Oalctum compound that
chronic lunjc and throat
troubles. A tonio-restorttlTe prepared
intarat harmful or baWt-fonnlnc drugs.
Try them today.
60 cents a box, Including war
Ta*
-Mi
Watch Your Blood Supply,
Don't Let Impurities Creep In
Pure Blood Means Perfect
Health.
Van Horn Tells About His
I- Experiences in Gas House
medicine, that is purely vegetable.
Many druggists have seen wonderful
results accomplished among their
customers by this great old medicine,
and they know that S. S. S. is one of
the most reliable blood purifiers ever
made. Keep your blood free of im
purities by the use of this honest old
medicine, and if yon want medical
advice, you can obtain same without
cost by writing to Medical Director,
Swift Specific Co., 28 Swift La bora
tory, Atlanta, Ga.
Lift Off Corns!
"Freezone" is Magic! Lift any Corn or Callus
right off with fingers—No pain!
tiny bottle of Freezone for a few cents,
sufficient to rid your feet of every
hard corn, soft oprn, or corn between
the toes, and calluses, without sore
ness or irritation. Try it! No humbug'
to hold sixty men standing, at one
time. The first gas we tried was tear
gas which is used a good bit by both
sides. It Is not fatal except in rare
cases, but. if strong enough and if
one is in it for a great length of
time without a mask, it causes blind
ness.
"But even if it doesn't kill, It is
very effective In putting out of ac
tion gun crews and small bodies of
troops that fail to get the masks on
quick enough after the gas shell
bursts near them.
"Seven seconds is the time allowed
for getting the mask out of its case
and on the head. We went in the
gas house with masks on, but
couldn't notice any difference in the
Gun bataUion, Camp Wheeler, Ma-Iair. After being In there for about
con, Ga. He entered service in Chi- five or ten minutes we were ordered
cago.
Van Horn, who used to live at 120
North Fourth street, tells Dr. E. C.
Brownlee, 400% Main street, about
his experiences with gas in a highly
interesting account.
"I have had one or two new ex
periences that I'm glad to have gone
through," says Van Horn.
"The most Interesting to me was
to remove the masks.
Troubles Begin.
"Then our troubles started, for as
soon as the gas reached our eyes
tears flowed down our cheeks in
streams. We could see very little
and had to be guided out of the
bouse. It did not cause any pain that
I could notice and after reachin
•a. lie auvsv uitiVtvouMQ A. vvuiu uu uvc ouu ill icr itjavuins __
my contact with gas, both tear and fresh air the tears stopped running. visitors on |f8t Saturday,
chlorine. Perhaps it will interest you The eyeballs remain a little blood-
also to hear a 'rooky* tell of his in- shot for a short time afterwards.
Production to something that all the "I took a good sniff of It before
,inea 'over there' are very familiar leaving the gas house ,but I can't de-
Iwith. scribe the odor. It isn't an unpleas
In the first place. Ill inform all ant smell, neither is it pleasant—
the world that I don't like gas masks, just about '50-50' and strange.
They are the most uncomfortable
tilings that anyone could think of. Ga* That Kills.
You have read about them, no doubt, "The next morning we went back
but 111 try and describe them in case for the chlorine gas, the kind that
you have forgotten about them. I lulls.
tin canister contains the 'dope'' "With the masks on the air was
•that makes the air pure as you pure and causcd us no trouble, but,
breathe it- From the canister to the ait before, we were allowed to leave
mask runs an air tube, ending in a some of the gas enter our masks.
«outh piece inside the mask proper. Now this gas had our Igoats.' That
bT Di-ontstv
r.
rnTii«i|iiiiB
A nose clamp is also attached to the is. most all of us were a little afraid elected to this grade, betn*
»ask and when adjusted stops all of selling: too much. (transferred to the seventh, succeed
action of that organ. The mask it-! "I think that state of mind was :lnK
aelf is made to fit very tight under causea by the warnings about 'get- ried the latter part of this month, ft
the chin, along the sides of the tjng too much* that the officers were:
Siead and across the forehead Just always shouting at as. 'eearcltv of funds due to the erection I
the chance go by, so I obtained a
who is suffering from an a be
ess in
an ear which caused an operation.
"Each ward is separate and has a
wide porch all around. The porch Is
all screened in and well supplied'
with big rocking chairs from one of!
which I am now writing.
"The ward contains thirty-two
white iron beds and now has about
twenty patients.
"The nurse3 are well trained and'
seem to take great interest In the!
condition of the men.
Doctors Are "Cutters."
"All the men in this ward have
something wrong with nose, throat
or ears. The doctors visit those
that are bedfast every morning- the I1®
ing place, with about four doctors In
each room, a nurse and an orderly
who are kept busy steilizinrg those
awful looking prongs, knives and
tweezers. The place is rery clean
BOARD GALLS FIVE
MORE KEOKUK MEN
Eight Additional Lee County Selective*
Ordered to Report for Military
Service Next Mon
day.
CITY TO GIVE 95 NOW
Number in Entire District is 217—Go
to Camp Pike, Arkan»a« to
Become U. 8.
Soldiers.
Five more Keokuk men have been
called by the. Lee county exemption
board for entrainment Monday, July
22, to enter military service.
Three men in tbe county outside
of the city are in the new list of
eight, furnished by the board for
publication today.
The Keokuk men are:
John Bailey, 808 Carroll street.
Caromelo Firrarillo, 422 Palean
street.
Loren Abel Knobbs (no address
given).
Walter Norman Raber, Philadel
phia, Pa.
Robert S. Ulrich, Davenport, la.
The county men are:
Harry Carter, Fort Madlaon.
Herbert Rings, Donnellson.
George J. Boll, Fort Madison.
Ninety-five men, instead of ninety,
who are essentially Keokuk citizens,
will entrain for Camp Pike, Ark.,
next Monday night.
The number from the county will
be 217, instead of 201, originally as
signed to be called up by the board.
KAHOKA, MO.
Norris Hunter has enlisted in the
service of Uncle Sam. He has been
assigned to the mechanical depart
ment and will attend school in St
Louis for three months or more.
Father T. F. Mullins has been
transferred to Shelbina. Father S.
Carew of BQcklin succeeds to the Ka
hoka parish.
Mrs. G. V. Calvert and little daugh
ter were guests of Memphis friends
Monday and Tuesday.
Twelve men will be sent from
Clark county to Camp Funston be
tween July 22 and 27.
The Kahoka Chautauqua opens on
Tuesday, July 23, and will continue
for six days. The program is an ex
ceptionally good one.
The dedication of the county serv
ice flag was held in Kahoka last Sat
urday afternoon. A fine program
was given. A number of articles'were
donated to be auctioned for the bene
fit of the Red Cross. The proceeds of
the sale amounted to $145.00.
C. J. Alexander and family of near
Mexico, Mo., accompanied by Mrs.
Alexander, of Memphis, were
11167 were former
county.
was
and the doctors seem to be v^ ?,y
ful
7
ful.
"However, they don't waste any
time If something needs cutting,
why they cut at once, at the same
time trying to cause as little as
possible."
A
residents of Clark
Spangler, of Kahoka, was united in
marriage on June 29 to .Miss Caroline |""J.
Brosamer, of Lawton, Okla. The
groom is a volunteer in' the service 7
of his country. Kahoka relatives and
friends extend congratulations.
At a meeting of the board of educa
tion of the school district of Kahoka
Monday evening, J. N. Woodruff was
re-elected secretary, and E. E. Cal
vert, treasurer. George Moore was
elected janitor for the coming school
term. Miss Lois Smith, of Kahoka,
el~ted
teacher of' the "four*
(grade. Ml88
Maurine Woodruff, who
Miss
Belcher, who will be mar-
of the new building, to ask for dona-
He Take, a Chance. tions toward the grading of the !•afternoon and evening Winter whealt
"However, I wasn't going to let!grounds and the building of a cement
waik.
good sniff. The gas causes a pecu- the date for every man and woman along the north line. Uneven germlna
ar, cold sensation in the nose and of the district interested to meet at
throat, but doesn't pain. It has an the school building, the men to bring!has «a^sed winter wheat to ripen un
odor that is neither pleasant nor un-j shovels and the ladies something I evenly. Spring wheat harvest Is in
pleasant but that is as far as I can good to eat and the work of grading j™1
describe it. Sie grounds will be pushed to a *"-"J
On Guard at Hospital. (speedy completion. Keep this date
"The other experience I spoke of'in mind. Cash donations will be ac
is being on guard at the base hospi-: cepted from those not In position to
taL It Isn't being on guard I like,, work.
chance^ it gives me to give The campaign, from a democratic
.p® once over* from the standpoint at least, was officially
mide. I am guarding a prisoner
opened
Girls! Make bleaching lotion
if skin is sunburned,
tanned or freckled
tjqueeze the juice of two lemons InT
a botUe
others go to the clinic Orchard White, shake well, and you
"The clinic Is a rather cruel look-
haTe a
THE DAILY GATE CITY
AMERICANS
E
NERVES
Nervousness and Nerve
Troubles on the Decline
"Nothing wrong but yoor nerves"
is a saying that Is fast dying out in
this country. While nerve trouble is
no organic disease, one of our leading
nerve specialists remarked: "A man
or woman might better break a leg
than have a shattered nervous sys
tem."
Overwork and worry drains the
nerve cells of their reserve stength
and food, and then follows the sleep
less night, indigestion, poor appetite,
Impure blood and general nervous
•break-down.
The thing to do in such cases no
longer troubles doctors and their pa
tients who know from their own ex
perience the value of Phosphated Iron.
They know that a few weeks* regular
use of this nerve food and red blood
builder will strengthen and (brace up
the whole nervous system, beause
Phosphated Iron gives the tired, hun
gry, wornout nerve cells phosphates
and iron, in a form easily and quickly
absorbed as one happy user said:
"You can almost feel it taking hold ot
the nerves and blood, after a short
time you feel like a new person life
seems a pleasure and worth living once
again.
In every section where Phosphated
Iron has been used there has been a
big decrease of nerve troubles and it
will prove a welcome relief to any
sufferer. You can hank on it for re
sults—it's pure.
To insure physicians and their pa
tients getting the genuine phosphated
Iron we have put op in capsules only,
do not take pills or tablets. Insist on
capsules.
McGrath Bros. Drug Co., Keokuk,
Iowa, and leading druggists every
where.
ney J. Roy of Hannibal spoke to a
large crowd in the park following the
usual band concert. Mr. Roy desires
to succeed Hon. M. A. Romjue as
congressman from this district. He
made a fine speech, as Roy always
does, and was heartily applauded by
his large audience. Mr. Romjue is
billed for an address at the same
place and hour nextjSaturday, July 20.
Senator X. P. Wilfley will address
the voters on Saturday afternoon.
July 20, at 2 o'clock. Senator Wil
fley is desirous of retaining his seat
in the United States senate. His op
ponent for the democratic nomina
tion is Hon. J. W. Folk, ex-governor
of Missouri. Yes, it can truthfully
be said the campaign is warming up
in Clark county.
Herbert Grisham of the Great
Lakes, 111., training station, spent a
few days the past week with Kahoka
relatives.
COOL AND DRY
WEATHER
Good Rains at End of Week with Ideal
Conditions for Farm
Labor in the
State.
w„ The Towa weather crop bulletin for
£L ™it5 fn the week ending July 16, has Jnst been
ned
follows-
and
last Saturday when Hon. Sid-
1 11
LEMON JUICE
TAKES OFF TAN
containing three ounces of
quarter Pjnt of the best
freck,e-
sunburn and tan lotion, and
cotDI!lexltm
beautifier, at very, very
Your grocer has the lemons and any
drug store or toilet counter will sup-
th,re€ on°ceA
Orchard White
for a few cents. Massage this sweet
ly fragrant lotion Into the face, neck,
arms and bands each day and see how
freckles, sunburn, windburn and tan
disappear and bow clear, soft and
.white the skin becomes. Tes! It is
binniwn
BreTaI,ed
till near
occurred In the northern and light
showers in the southern portions of
of the state temperatures averaged
about six degress below normal in the
eastern and about one degree below
in the western portions. Sunshine was
much above normal, except the ex
treme western and northern counties.
The drouth in the southwestern part
of the state is becoming serious.
Conditions were ideal for using la
bor and horse power to the best pos
sible advantage in haying and harvest
ting. Though put to a supreme test,
farmers 'nave been able to cope with
decided by the board owing to ithe difficult laibor situation. In some
ca8*B
business men have gone out
0,6
to*"18
helP
ear17
Monday. July 29, was set as ithe "outaern districts and beginning
1 tIon due to of
P™?L*'18
,n the
,n
Corn made good progress except in
the southwest district. Is tasellng rap
pldly in most sections and silking in
some. Unless a good soaking rain
comes soon the crop will be seriously
damaged in the southwest district
where the leaves rolled badly during
the past week with comparatively
moderate- temperatures.
The final estimates on total corn
acreage for the state is 10.337,700. In
the preliminary figure published last
week too much allowance was made
for overflow and not enough for lata
planted acreage.
Pastures are generally short in th®
southwestern third of the state and
are brown and bare in the extreme
three weeks and much live stock Is
being sold to avoid using expensive
feed.
—Subscribe for The Gate City.
St Dcmls at New York.
Detroit at Boston.
Chicago at Washington.
Cleveland at Philadelphia.
_Jat®
oats harvest is completed In
moisture last fall
*he ?,.
W?v
em districts and will begin In the
north central and northeast districts
about the 23-25th. Rye harvest Is
completed except in the north central
district. Barley harvest is completed
In the southern and central districts,
and Is in fall progress in the northern
districts. Oats threshing began in
Van Buren county on the 12th. Yield
ing forty-eight bushels per acre and
in Pottowottamie county on the 13th.
yielding forty-one bushels. In Davis
county winter wheat yielded thirty-one
bushels. Second crop alfalfa Is ready
to cut Much other hay of excellent
quality has been harvested.
IPr
LO, THE HOT WAVE
HETU1ETH SOOII
Negligee Attire, Ice Cream, Palm
Leafs and Beach Dips to Be
come Popular Again at
Once.
PREDICTION IS MADE
July, a Slacker Month, to Live up to
Its. Name After Days of
Refreshing Cool-
Get ready for a warm wave. It is
headed tljls way and unless unforseen
conditions arise wm*be here Sunday.
July has been a slacker as & genu
ine summer month. It has been sixty
percent, short on heat thus far and
is 1.78 Inches below normal in rain
fall though there have been the re
quisite number of sunshiny days and
the normal velocity of wind.
Hot weather will begin tomorrow,
weather bureau officials say. Tem
perature high in the nintles will be
registered Sunday. But the rain drops
will be missing.
During the month there have been
only three warm days.
CLUB STANDINGS
Yesterday's Results.
Detroit, 4-2 New York, 1-3.
Chicago, 3-3 Philadelphia, 1-4.
Cleveland, 5 Washington,
National League.
New York, 8 St. Louis, 5.
Philadelphia, 1 Pittsburgh, 0.
Brooklyn. 3 Chicago, 2.
American League.
St Louis, 6 Boston, 3.
Standing of the Clubs.
National League.
Chib. W. L. Pet
Chicago 56 26 .683
New York .. .. .. ....50 31 .617
Pittsburgh 41 38 .519
Philadelphia 38 41 .48
Cincinnati 35 b2 .455
Boston 35 45 '.450
St Louis ... 34 49 .410
Brooklyn 31 47 .397
American League.
Club. W. L. Pet.,
Boston 51 34 .600
Cleveland 48 40 .545
New Ycrk 44 39 .530
Washington ... 43 41 .512
Chicago 39 43 .476
St Louis 39 44 .470
Detroit 36 46 .430
Philadelphia 34 47 .420
Today's Schedule.
National League.
New York at St Louis.
Boston at Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Chicago.
Philadelphia at Pittsburgh.
American League.
REVERE, MO.
Hay havest Is now over. Oats, rye
and wheat are all in the shock. So
we hope to hear the whistle of the
threshing machine soon.
Rev. Selby, pastor of the M. E.
church, preached both morning and
evening.
The Ladies' aid met at the home
of Mrs. Charles Gudka, north of
town, last Thursday.
Peter Hitch and family of Fort
Madison spent last Sunday at the
home of his sister, Mrs. Harry
Brown.
Grandma St Clair, who was ninety
six years old in June, fell last Mon
day and broke her hip, while at the
home of her son, Arthur St Clair.
Miss Clara Belle Gain of Wyacon
da spent the week end with her
friend. Miss Vera Druse, of this city.
Otis Shuler is the possessor of a
new automobile.
Mrs. Will Ehrhart and daughter
spent Tuesday at the home of the
former's mother, Mrs. Rebecca Wolf.
Mrs. Robertson of SummitvlHe Is
visiting with Mrs. G. D. Curtis.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Huason of
this city are spending a few days
with the latter*s Bister, Mrs. Lane
Kinkeade, east of town.
Dr. Sowers and family spent last
Sunday with Jim Galland and fam
'ily.
Cephas Cronin has received word
that"his
sw Itady^ h£d *£rfv«rf safely
in France.
I Several of our boys in and around
the vicinity of Revere will leave for
camp next week.
Danford Parker, wife and children
spent last Sunday at the home of
Walter Epperhart of this city.
Albert Schriyer left Monday for
Colorado.
L. E. White shipped a carload of
hogs from Revere Tuesday.
Get the Habit
southwest*counties, where""on™ mwy Postage stamp aimost without thought,
farms stock has been fed for the Past j)*s
Duluth News-Tribune You buy a
a.
\on Ye
Bta"P
80mething_
and
for
receive service front
Uncle Sain for what you give. Why
not develop the habit as to war sav
ings stamps? You can do it just as
well as not You ought to do it The
Question it: Will you do it?
AMUSEMENTS
THE GRAND
PRESENTS
Made
By
Vltagraph
"IF IT'S GOOD"
YOO'LL
SEE IT AT THE
&
TOMORROW at the GRAND
THI8 SPECIAL. FEATURE WILL BE SHOWN SATURDAY ONLY
"BAREE, SON OF KAZAN"
A wonderful screen revelation of wild animals In their native
haunts of Indians and of trappers.
A STORY OF THE GREAT NORTHWEST
WHERE MIGHT STIRS AND LOVE CONQUERS
Regular
Admission
Prices
We strive to do tbe impossible—Please everybody
T0NIGHT-7, 8:15, 9:30"^ woSr1""'
MADGE KENNEDY
in "The Danger Game''
A STORY OF MELODRAMATIC DARING
TOMORROW—
2:00, 4:00, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 9:30
MAY
ALLISON
"THE WINNING
OF BEATRICE"
HAROLD LLOYD COMEDY
VENGEANCE and the WOMAN
Matinee only
E A I E S
Excursion to Nauvoo
Every Sunday on Steamer
KEOKUK
LEAVE WAESAW 1:30 P. M.
LEAVE KEOKUK 2:30 P. M.
LEAVE NAUVOO 6:00 P. M.
PARE INCLUDING WAR TAX 40c AND 25c
Music and Dancing
SERVICE STATION
Ask for Threaded Rubber Insulation
And see that you get what you ask for.
You can tell by the Willard trademark
which is branded into the side of every Still
Better Willard Battery. Only batteries with
this trademark have Threaded Rubber Insu
lation,
The Willard Mark is your assurance that
you are getting in your battery the most dur
able insulation known.
There's more about the Mark and the
Insulation in the booklet "A Mark with a
Meaning for You."
Keokuk Electric and Battery Shop
Prompt, efficient, courteoua service.
Phone 1507 1317 Main
..
••.
§&|
JfeTRIDAY, JULY 19'1?
AMU&tM.ci.xTS
r,
MARGUERITE CLARK
IN
"RICH MAN, POOR MAN"
TONIGHT
Featuring
Nell 8hipman and
Alfred Whitman
LEAN
HER EYES
AND
SMILE
MONDAY AND TUESDAY—
CLARA
KIMBALL
YOUNG
In
"The
Reason
Why

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