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Audubon County journal. (Exira, Iowa) 1884-1993, April 07, 1910, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057934/1910-04-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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I
I,
I
A Andrews of Atlantic was here
on business.
Dave Beers was a business visitor
in Exira Monday.
Arthur Thompson left Tuesday foj
a visit in Audubon.
W. H. Wheeler of Cromwell was
in Bray ton Tuesday.
Louie Beck purchased a new spread
«r At S Nelson Saturday.
Mable Griffin of Exira is visiting
friends at the Ceranack home.
Ralph Juhl went to Atlantic Mob
4»y to have some dental work done.
A^P Nelton and -family left Tues
day evening lor their new home in
Sooth Dakota.
Ray Leonard of Audabon visited
at the George Freeman from Friday
uatil Saturday.
The Misses Mable Hall and Vivian
Heaih of Exira attended the dance
here Fridiy sight.
Mrs. Myers of Amita visited with
ber aister, Mrs. Dr. Knob Irpm Fri
day entil Monday.
E. A. Chittenden, the depot agent,
who takes Charlie Mark's place ar
.. rived here Monday.
Lntie Freeman returned to ber
sewing in Audubon Saturday after a
pleasant visit with her pareats.
My horse will be in Bray ton Liv
ery Barn every Saturday.
tf J. Birk
John Buch8chauer is able to do
«ome work again and ia chopping
w»od for John Jenkins this week.
.. The ice cream social given by the
Ladies Aid Society was a grand suc
cess, the proceeds amounting to $24.
Jeas Juhl, Ramie Miller, Dr. Koob
and Rasmussen each drove their
autos to meat the pathfinder's car
Saturday.
h- Business done at the depot during
March, 1910: 't
I Carloads Forwarded: Hogs 7
i, cattle 4, emigrant 7, corn I, wood 1
Carloads Received: Emigrant 1
'"Mealt 1, cement l, Iron pipe 1, lumber
12.
sand 1 and coal 1.
Ticket Sales, $22491..
Bray ton bad quite an exciting time
Monday night, when at a little paat
midnight the alarm of fire was heard
At first it was'thought to be the
the Inmber yard and everyone rushed
to the scene and on arriving it vai
found to be at the rear of the post
office building where a bonfire had
been started during the day and it
must bave been smouldering as the
strong wind fanned it to a blaze,
catching a wheelbarrow full of trash
on fire which stood near. There was
-/u no damag%doue -uly consuming the
wheelbarrow of rubbish, but with
the wind blowing like it did it
might have caused a big blaze, hait
it not been seen when it was.
'&>•***£
—AM^wmmmmH

1
m—m-m
Painting and Paper
Hanging
SYKES and KOOB
Brayton,Jlowa, Phone Bray-
ton Central.-
Ester Peterson left t'or Omaha
Wednesday where she goes to work.
Mrs. J. S Harter spent a tew days
la9t week with relatives in Atlantic.
E Hortoii ot Smith Dakota c*me
Ifriday to visit his father, AT Hor
ton.
Mr. Fabricius moved his family to
the house recently vacated by J. F.
Jensen.
Mrs. Soren Anderson and daughter
Amelia were shopping in Audubon
Monday.
McGrovern & Co. shipped a carload
of hogs to the Des Moines market
Wednesday.
Soren and Nets Nelson were busi
ness callers in Omaha from Wednes
day until Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Jenkins' were
shopping in Atlantic Saturday go
ing down in the auto.
Arthur Anderson and N Chris
toffersen attended the corn lecture at
Audnbon Wednesday. ,s
Anton Juhl went down to Atlan
tic one day last week aud traded his
Ford auto on a new Reo.
Dr. Robinson of Atlantic was up
to the H. M. Bartlett farm last Wed
nesday looking after business.
Mrs. Bowen who has been vi
siting in Des Moines for some time
returned to her home one day la^t
week.'i
The Fine March Weather
Has put every house owner to thinking about Wall
Paper and Paint.
/II
A. ~1IF R/SI 5,4
1
RSFR
Miss Dena Hensley came home with
Dj. Koob and daughters in the auto
from Exira Monday and visited uu
til Tuesday night.
Sykes' 9 year old son Reggie
was badly scalded on his limbs ahd
chest one day last week, but is repor
ted as doing nicely.
Owen Ide received a telegram from
Long Braneh, California that Oliver
Smith was very low and he left im
mediately for that ace.
Mrs. Harris of Lewis arrived here
Tuesday from Carroll where she went
to attend a family reunion and stop
ped here on her return to visit her
daughter, Mrs. Link Akers.
Jensen moved his family last
week to their new location at Roor
back. They are not strangers among
the people at tbat place having resid
ed there before coming to Brayton.
A Sad Death
Wall Paper
We can this year show a larger and more attractive
line of new and up to date patterns than aver be
fore. "5c per roll and up.
In Paint
We handle the Mound City Horse Shoe Brand, one
of the few paints that could stand up under the
Pure Paint Law. All standard makes of paint
have advanced 20c per gallon in the last 6 months,
but having a large stock on hand at the lower price
will sell it at last year's prices while it lasts.
If you need'anything in our line let us figure with
you before you buy. We may save you meney.
•N "HANSEN.
Prescription Druggist Exira, Iowa
WiMi
Tuesday the remains ot the 9-year
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Harris of Los Angeles, California
was brought here where interment
took place at the Otkfield Cametery.
This was indeed a sad death. They
had visited with relative heie but a
few short week''»go, ad had bees
at home but a short time, when the
accident
occhired,
which caused her
death.
She had gone to post a loiter at the
mail box when a 1-utv running an au
tomobile came upotrher runuiui: over
her ai.d injuring her a* to cause
her death. It was a terrible blow fu
the mother and father and their grief
is indeed great as this is their only
child.
They were accompanied here by
friends from A Untie and were met
at the dep it. by their many friends.
The undertaker from Atlantic had
charge*of the funeral at this place
and the teams which r.onveved the
sorrowing pirentw, relative# and
friends to the ia*t sad resnng place
were broujrt here trom Atltin'ic
There were manv beautiful floral
tributes and 'he whole community
joins in sympathy with ihe sorrow
ing pirents in this sad hou'-. This
little darling has gone to dwell with
hitn who «aid "Suffer litilo children
to ime iimto me and forbid them
not."
The Demon Of The Air
is the germ of LaSrippe, that, breathed
in, brinffn suffering to thousands. It's
after effects are weakness, nervousness,
lack of appetite energy and ambition,
with disordered livei and kidneys. The
greatest need then is Electric Bitters,
the splendid tonic, blood purifier and re
gulator of stomach, liver and kidneys.
Thousands have proved that they won
derfully strengthen the nerves, buildup
the system and restore healih and good
spirits after an attack of the grip. If
suffering, try them. Only 50c. Perfect
satisfaction guaranteed by Nick Doffing
MADE BRAVE FIGHT
CONVICT'S REMARKABLE BATTLE
FOR FREEDOM.
Record Walk Across Africa Is His
How He Reached Europe Only
to Fall Into the Hands of
His Enemies.
London
News was received la London re
cently of the death of Joseph Cres
wlck, who while fleeing from justice
accomplished one of the most remark
able walking feats on record, says the
London Globe.
Creswick was undergoing a sen
tence for forgery in Rhodesia and
while being conveyed from one prison
to another by train (as reported some
months ago) conceived the Idea of
escaping from his guards. As his
legs were heavily ironed the task was
by no means an easy one, but one
night, when the train in which he
was being conveyed was between
Buluwayo and Salisbury and his
guards were asleep Creswick quietly
opened the carriage door and jumped
out. When he reached the ground he
fell but was not badly hurt During
the remainder of the night he shuffled
along in the dark and at daybreak
could see the railroad in the distance.
He decided to walk in a straight line
from it, which he did for several days,
still with his feet shackled. iiM
Day after day and night after night
he rubbed his irons with the sharp
est pieces of rock he could find until
at last he was able to throw his man
acles aside. After this Creswick went
on with great strides through the un
known country in which he found
himself, his sole object being to get
to some white settlement.
Some weeks after his escape the
wanderer had a wonderful piece of
luck. In a hut apparently belonging
to a settler he found a gun and some
ammunition, which wnder the circum
stances he did not hesitate to take
possession of. With the gun he
managed to shoot several zebras and
other animals, which provided him
with a welcome meal but unfor
tunately his gun got out of order be
fore his ammunition became exhaust
ed and he had to rely upon fruit for
his sustenance.
Just when Creswick was coming to
the conclusion that he had been walk
ing 'round and 'roupd without making
much progress be fell in with some
natives, who gave him certain direc
tions as to how to find "a very long
water," which Creswick concluded
must mean the River Congo, and for
several more weeks he continued his
tramp.
Eight months after his escape from
the train between Salisbury and Bulu
wayo Creswick was found by a party
of Belgians lying in a weak and fever
ish condition about two hundred miles
from Leopoldville on the Congo. They
nursed him back to health and
strength. At Bomba. arrayed in all
the glory of a pair of cricket flannels
and a football jersey provided by his
new friends, the fugitive found a ship
on Which he worked his passage to
Antwerp. From there he got a ship
to London. That, however, led to his
undoing, for while walking in White
chapel he was recognized by Detective
Inspector Belcher of Scotland Yard,
who. arrested him on the charge of es
caping from lawful custody.
He was taken subsequently to Rho
desia as a fugitive offender, and for
his escapade he was sentenced to a
further term of six months imprison
ment during which he died.
Worse Than Bullets
Bullets have often caused less sufler
ing to soldiers than the eczema L. W.
Harrfman, Burlington. Me., got in the
army and suffered th. forty year*.
"But Bucklen's Arnica Salvo eur«'d me
when all else failed," he writes. Great*
est healer fsr sores, ulcers, hoi's, burns,
cuts, wounds, bruises and pi.es. 25c at
Nick Doffing's.
J"*
Greeley But. Fire Ins. Co.
Why not insure in this Co?
They are the most reliable
and cheapest Co. in existance
Also Wind and Tornado Ins.
written.
'f'
SOCIAL
DIVERSIONS
(Scene—Any large house on one of
Chicago's fashionable streets. Before
it are numerous motor cars and car
riages and the strip of bright velvet
carpet up the steps shows that an aft
ernoon tea is in progress within. Two
women, one in gray velvet, the other
in green broadcloth with heavy hand
embroidery, approach hastily down the
sidewalk, changing to a leisurely pace
as their feet touch the bright hued
carpet.)
Woman in Gray—Thank goodness,
we didn't meet a soul outside and any
one seeing us now couldn't tell but
that we had driven up in that electric
motor standing at the curb!
Woman in Green—Our car is in the
repair shop and—
Woman in Gray—It's been in all
winter, hasn't it, dear? Anyone would
think you didn't have one at all. I
knew some people who did that to save
garage rent—not that I mean—of
course—
Woman in Green (hastily)—Good
ness, they've hired all the waiters in
town, I think—four men in the hall
alone,! Yes, I'm going upstairs first.
I'm going to keep my coat, but I think
it's a shame for a hostess to fix her
bedrooms up and have nobody see
them. I heard that she had her own
room done over completely in Circas
sian walnut and blue brocade, but I
don't believe it, for a man told my
husband that her. husband was run
ning awfully close to the wind. Well,
it is Cireassion walnut! Did you ever!
Mercy, this is cheap face powder!
Woman in Gray—Lottie Thorston is
here—that's her coat, the moth-eaten
looking one. She's worn it for ten
years, I believe. Let's go down. Isn't
there a crowd! I suppose everybody
came because there weren't many
other things to go to to-day. You can't
make me believe Mrs. Klimber is so
dreadfully popular. She's just push
ing. Look! Her dress Is a fright!
How do you do, Mrs. Klimber! It's
lovely to see you again! My dear,
your decorations through the rooms
are charming and make such a becom
ing background for you in that sweet
frock.
Woman in Green—How are you,
Mrs. Klimber? I needn't ask, because
you are looking awfully well. Dear
me, there are so many people behind
me that I cao't get in even a little bit
of chat. I'll move on!
Woman in Gray—She's got Mrs. Ce
dar and Mrs. Lake assisting. Now,
how in the world did she manage that?
You needn't tell me I know she just
grabbed and cornered them! That's
her way! Just because she has a little
money she dares try anything! Any
body can make a showing who.is will
ing to do that! There's Sarah Hittey
over there and isn't she terribly made
up! Anyone who didn't know she was
35 would say she looked positively
young. Good afternoon, Sarah! I was
just saying how sweet you looked!
My dear, where did you get that per
fectly stunning gown? It makes you
look positively 8llm!
S 2* S
vs.,
Geo. Kness, Secy,
V~ W 'v
"No
one
glancing
at you would think you weighed as
much as you do! I remember now,
you had a lavender satin year before
last and you've just had it covered
with the spangled stuff and made
over! Well, that's clever and most
people would never dream it was an
old gown.
Woman in Green—Let's go on out
into the dining room. I want to get
near that woman with the coral wil
low plumes so I can have a good look
at her. Why, haven't you heard of
her? She's the one who tried to rope
in the Glendennings' son and his mil
lions. She's ten years older than he
and divorced and he was crazy about
her till his father sent him to Mozam
bique or Oshkosh or somewhere. Go
slowly. Well, all I can say is that he
certainly was crazy. I think that type
of face with the big oriental eyes and
scarlet lips is perfectly unladylike. It
makes you think of snake charmers
and things of that sort. Why are men
such idiots?
Woman in Gray*—That's not Mrs.
Klimber's lace tablecloth. Every place
Maccaroon has served this winter I've
seen it! Orchids on the table! Well,
I suppose she struck a bargairt sale,
for there's $100 worth there!
Woman in Green—Isn't that Etta
White at the coffee urn? They say
her grandfather will leave her half a
million. No wonder she is called the
most popular debutante! My mother
knew her mother when she had to
scrub her own kitchen floor! Did you
ever taste such weird sandwiches in
your life?
Woman in Gray—They're awful. And
I know that whipped cream is part
egg. I expect the Klimbers had to
save somewhere, since they got the
Circassian walnut. And such little
dabs of frozen punch! I know where
she got those plates—I saw them at
a mark-down sale one day. With these
lights the gold on them looks almost
like real hand work. Look at those
women in the door, glaring! I think
they want our seats. Some people are
so ill bred. We can get upstairs
through this door. Goodness! Look
at the way things are piled on my
furs! I' never— Oh, you say you
jUst this instant laid your cos* there?
Well, sable crushes so. Oh, Jhat wom
an stepped all over my train! What
a pretty handkerchief on the floor! I
I can't find my own so I'll just keep
It. No doubt the owner is gone any
how." Are you ready?
Woman in Green—Yes. Hurry be
fore the doorman shttuts out to ask
your carriage number. Good-by Mrs.
Klimber—such a lovely time!
Woman in Gray—A perfectly charm
ing afternoon! Good-by, Mrs. Klimber!
Open-Air Barbers in Spain.
Fingers that smell of garlic, soap
that gives no latber, a razor that may
have been used for cutting a raw
ham, and a flourish tbat reminds one
of an executioner rather than of a
barber—such are the qualifications of
the itinerant Spanish hairdresser, de
clares a writer'in the Wide World
The victim—we use the term advised
ly—must be a patient, long-suffering
man, neither the slave of time nor of
any petty feelings tuch as delicacy
and sensitiveness, a otherwise he will
fare badly at the halids of his torturer.
For the Spanish opin-air barber is a
calm man, who takes everything for
granted, and never for a moment
doubts that you are satisfied with his
attentions and will pay him accord
ingly.
3*^-* f. J"* f~
ALCOIIQL 3 PER CEN'l
AVcgelaMeR-cparMionfcrAs
similaiing theFoocfandRegula
ling lite Stomachs andBowds of
rroTC'jros DigcsfioaXkafii-l
ness and R? r.f.Contains neiitier
Opiura.Mori?huie norMiueral.
Not N
arcotic
JfeqpeofOtdDz&MUELPtluitlt
jUx.Smaa
jfaaeSud
HamSad
Ctartiktl Sugar-
Aperfect Remedy forCoitsnpa
tion, Sour Storaaeh.Dtarrhoea
Worms
.ConvulsionsJeverish
ness andLoss
OF SLEEP.
Facsimile Signature of
NEW YOBK.
Atb months olo
35 DOSES-35CEINTS
Exact Copy of Wrapper.
H*r Hiitband«.
It Is said that before a man has dis
covered the color of a girl's eyes she
Is planning her trousseau and leading
him to the altar—but
The bachelor girls' destination ne
cessitated their going through Wood
lawn cemetery. In New York, a por
tion of the city they had never before
visited. They stopped for a long time
on the bridge which crosses the lake
to admire the wonderSully well-kept
banks, which slope dowu to the edge
of the lake, with here and there some
artistically arranged shrubbery serv
ing as a background. As they cast a
last look at the island, situated at one
end of the lake, which Is so tiny that
one wonders how the large willow
tree standing at the water's edge with
its drooping branches hanging so low
that they sweep backward and for
ward In the water with the wind, could
possibly have grown there, one of t^ie
bachelor girls was heard to remark
to her companion: "Wouldn't this be
an Ideal place to bury one's husbands
and come'and weep over their
graves?"
A Peculiarity of Dreams.
As to dreams, there was a discus
sion at the club lunch, and one man
remarked that no man dreamed of
himself as braver than he is. When
the dream came, the dreamer was al
ways the under-dog. He was in hor
rible danger, and never did anything
picturesque to face It. There may be
men who are brave in their sleep. But
it would be interesting to find one
man outside of the dozen sleeping cow
ards who is a hero in a dream.
Up-to-Date Romance.
"At last we are alone!" he mur
mured, as the airship rose above the
city.
"Wait a minute!" she exclaimed.
"There's somebody rubbering through
that skylieht!"—Puck.
clover Seed
For aalr al the Elevator.
-f
emu
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have
Always Bought
In
Use
Over
Thirty Years
CASTORIA
Rose Comb Rhode
Island Reds
Eggs For Hatching
Pen of selected birds. $1.00
per setting of 15.
Mrs. W. J. Lancelot,
Exira, Iowa.
Farms To Rent
Two 80 acre farms near Exira,'
One 100 acre farm near Exira.
Two 160 acre fartno.
A.
H«-rmno Biirnlioldt
Fresh plants, trees fresh, dug day
shipped, tlixtyon can plapt in few
hours belier thi tree delivery
stock RgeutN hnve Inying aroU
drying out »ml impose on you as
live Btnff, apply and wri'e for that
kind of inn s-rv Htock that i* alive
when you yet n, to
W Vt Riim'wrDer,
Harlan,
Th.
CASTORIA
For Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have Always Bought
Bears the
Signature of
John Rendleman
Caab paid for eggs.
tf A. C. James
C. A. Petersen
Auctioneer and Breeder of
Single Comb Rhode Island
Reds Poultry. Eggs for sale
at SI.00 for setting of 15 at
home, when shipped 25c ex
tra. Now is the time to get
some early chjcks. Don't miss
a setting of these good lay
ers. Yours for business.
Evergreen Poultry Farm
Exira, Iowa.
133
V)
1
L. NESLUND
Photographer.
Good Work Guaranteed
DR. JOHN RIJLEY,
Physician Surgeon
Office Phone 53 House Phone S7
Oflc* flrtt door eait of n-i.«
Corner Drug Store, upitelre "*'™i I0W1
Bus to and from all
trains. Phone
CM
VM

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