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Audubon County journal. (Exira, Iowa) 1884-1993, September 22, 1910, Image 8

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Christian Church Notes
Sunday School 10 a. m. We have
classes tor individuals of all ages.
Tbe adults are especially invited to
join the Adult Bible CiasB taught
by the pastor.
Sunday 11 a. m. Subject "The
Unity That Christ Prayed For''
3 p. m. Juoior Endeavor.
6:45 Senior Endeavor,
7:45 p. m. Subject "Man, whence,
what and whither."
Thursday 8 p. m. Teachers and
students Bible Study class. Gome
end study the greatest book on
earth.
Audubon Township Church
Service at 3 p. m. Subject "What
think thee of Christ."
See our line of Gasoline Engines.
Exira Auto & Machine Wks.
P. K. Jensen.
Wanted—A neat young man with
a little capital to buy half interest
in paying business. Apply at Jour
nal Office, Exira Iowa.
Come in and Jet U9 give you an
idea of the bargains we have in
South Dakota Lands.
tf Doffing Land Co.
A Reliable flediclne—Not A Narcotic.
Mrs. F.Marti. St. Joe, Mich., says Fo
ley's Honey and Tar saved her little
boy's life. She writes: "Our little boy
contracted a severe bronchial trouble
and as the doctor's medicine did not
cure him I gave him Foley's Honey and
Tar in which I have great faith. It cured
the cough as well as the choking and
gagging spells and he got well in & short
time. Foley's Honey and Tar has many
times saved us much trouble and we are
never without it it in the house." Sold
by all druggists.,,
And was considered the Best Photo
grapher in the State of Iowa, will be®
in Exira Friday and Saturday of this
week. See Him.
If you had any pictures taken while I have been in
Exira read this, as owing to a bad case of plates I am
forced to take a good many pictures over.
It is a big expense to me, but I would rather spend a
few dollars and give you first class work. So for the
benefit of the people who had any work done and the
ones who want first class work I have gone into part
nership with Mr. Frank Shearer, of Des Moines, Iowa,
who is considered the best photographer in the State
of Iowa and was awarded the highest prize in Iowa—
a gold medal at the Iowa Phoiographic Association in
1909. Mr. Shearer will be here Friday and Saturday
of this week and take over all pictures that must be
taken over and will also take pictures of all who will
be in at that time. Mr. Shearer will do all our finish
ing. My partner is the best photographer moDey can
produce, and Exira can boast of the best photographer
J*
„,^gin Iowa.
On account of poor health my doctor Mr. F. Rosen
bladt ordered me to get fresh air and exercise and to
do this I will take country views for the next few
week until I am able to work inside again. I will be
in town every evening. While I am out I will take
any size photo you may want, and I will also enlarge
any photo you may have. I will work in every direc
tion from town, so if you want to have pictures taken
1 V' be prepared.
Sale
of Atlantic
nds
Saturday
All the people who had any work done while I have
been in Exira please call Friday or Saturday and I
will either have your work done or Mr. Shearer will
take them over. Wednesday of this week I will have
my samples ready, so please call and examine them.
Don't forget the dates, Friday and Saturday of thie
week. Mr. Shearer will also be here the last two days
of this week from now on so I would rather have you
come in the last two days of this week so I can finish
re your work right away and not keep you waiting.
H. PARKS
Photographer. Exira, Iowa
For Hard Coal see Olut Jensen, tf
Good 240 acre tarm for rent. Call
at the Exchange Bank. tf
For quick sale listyour farms with
Col. C.' E. Mertz, Manning, la. s29
For Shoe repairs go to John An
derson in the Haas Miller shop, tf
Why not join our next excursion
to South Dakota?
tf Doffing Land Co.
Let us figure on your Windmill
and Pump job.
Exira Auto & Machine Wks.
My two houses
Street for sale.
a 29
P. K.Jensen.
on Washington
Chris Jensen
Exira, Iowa.
Have a quarter section in Faulk
County, South Ddkota, for which
we can take some cattle or horses
in exchange. What have you to
trade. Owner bought it, intend
ing to move there but has changed
his mind. Going at $30 per acre
See Journal.
If you are looking for a home or
an investment it will pay you to see
the Doffing Land Co. tf
An Innovation
P. M. Christensen Btarted an in
novation in Exira last week when
he purchased a one and one-half
Horse-power gasoline engine and a
modern chothes washer which he
bad installed athishomeand which
he says gives good satisfaction in
every respect and now his better
half regards wash day rb one no
more to be regarded with dread but
with pleasure.
For Sale
150 Single Comb Rhode Island
Red cockrels splendid quality. Pop
ular price fifty cents each. First
come first served Call or phone
tf L. W. Hansen
Exira, la.
We do not expect to become a
Vanderbilt by means of the pro
ceeds of the Journal but if every
subscription was paid up to date we
could pay our debts and have
enough left to buy a new hat which
we badly need.
kitchen quietly when the girl was
out. She placed a shawl over her
head and with matches in her hand
she entered the dark kitchen by the
back door and was almost imme
diately siezed and embraced and
kissed in the most ardent manner.
Burning with rage and bent on ad
ministering a terrible rebuke she
tore loose from his embrace and lit
a match and there stood face to
face with the hired girl's beau.
Her husband says she was never
more affectionate since the day they
were married.
EFFECT OF WATERWAY COMPETI-
fTION
It was stated in a previous article
that waterways produce both direct
and indirect savings In the cost of
transportation and also exert what
may be called a creative effect. As
an Instance of the direct saving it
was shown that the 100,000,000 tons of
freight handled on the great lakes
in 1907 were carried for $550,000,000
less than it would have coBt by rail.
If the opinion of the United States
army engineers Is correct—and this
opinion Is based upon results actually
achieved on the rivers of Europe—
we have a number of rivers on which,
when properly improved, freight can
be carried for less than on the lakes
and many rivers on which It can be
carried for much less than by rail.
If, therefore, the plan advocated by
the National Rivers and Harbors
congress should be carried out—which
includes the improvement of all our
rivers to such extent as shall be found
advisable after expert examination—
the direct saving in cost of transporta
tion would be vastly increased. It
would probably be increased tenfold,
but if it were only doubled the direct
saving in a single year would be more
than enough to pay off the national
debt.
But this is not the end of the bene
fits which the general improvement of
our waterways would bring, it is only
the beginning. Beside the direct sav
ing there is an indirect saving which
results from the effect of waterways
on railway freight rates, for rates
are always lower on railroads which
meet water competition than on those
which do not. The amount of this sav
ing is not everywhere the same, owing
to difference in conditions, but we
can get a good general idea of it from
a study of some sample instances.
Freight Rates Affected.
Freight rates from New York to
Salt Lake or Spokane are much high
er than to San Francisco or Seattle,
although the distance is much less, be
cause gpods can be carried to the Pa
cific coast by water, around Cape
Horn, while there is no waterway of
any kind to the inland cities named.
It is not the ocean alone that affects
railroad rates. Compare the rates on
first class merchandise to river towns
and inland towns situated about 250
miles from St. Louis. Towns on the
upper Mississippi get a rate of 33
cents a hundred, inland towns pay 63
cents towns on the Ohio pay 41 cents,
inland towns in the same region
pay 87.
A still more striking instance, and
one showing the direct result of wa
terway improvement, is to be found
on the Columbia river. Before the
locks at the cascades were built
freight rates on nails, and that class
of goods, from Portland to The Dalles
were $6.40 per ton. As soon as the
locks were finished and the steam
boats could get through, the railroad
rate dropped to two dollars per ton—
less than one-third what it was before.
That the difference was due to the
river improvement is shown by the
fact that rates were not reduced be
yond the point to which the steam
boats could run. For instance, the
rate on salt in car load lots was $1.50
per ton to The Dalles, and $10.20 per
ton to Umatilla—$1.50 per ton for the
88 miles with water competition and
$8.70 per ton for the next 100 miles
without. These rates have since been
reduced as the improvement has pro
ceeded, and when the work is finished
and boats can run far up the Colum
bia river and to Lcwflfeton and other
point in Idaho on its principal tribu
tary, the Snake river, the people In
all that region will benefit not only
by the direct saving on goods carried
by water, but also by the indirect sav
ing through the reduced rate on goods
carried by rail. Exactly similar re
sults would follow the radical im
provement of rivers all over the United
States.
Indirect 8avlng Large
There Is, however, no possible way
of finding out just how much this in
direct saving would be. Rates on some
freight would be reduced greatly, on
some freight slightly, on some, per
haps, not at all. But we can get some
idea of the amount of freight which
might be influenced. In the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1907, the total
amount of freight handled by the
railroads of the United States was
1,796,336,059 tons. Some of this was
hauled a short distance, some a long
distance, and some was handled by
more than one road, but it was equal
to 236,601,390,103 tons hauled one
mile. If the comprehensive improve
ment of our waterways should mako
an average reduction of one mill per
ton-mile—the difference in the rates
on salt given above is 70 times as
much, or seven cents per ton mile—U
would make a saving of over $236,600,
000 on the value of business handled
hi the fiscal year.
At first glance, it looks as if that
would mean disaster to the railways,
but that is the exact opposite of the
truth. Strange as it may seem, the
surest and speediest way to enlarge
the business and Increase the profits
of the railways of the United Stfttes
Is to Improve the waterways of the
United States.
9
A- f,
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'Ph^ u:. *Va!v
1 5
rasf
I
RATES
ON THE RAILWAYS OF
THE COUNTRY.
DIRECT AND INDIRECT SAVING
Conservative Estimate Is That In a
Single Year It Would Be More Than
Enough to Discharge the Entire Na
tional Debt.
NOT SUCH A DIFFERENCE.
After much reconnoitering and
strategy the leader of the wandering
•German bant" succeeded in gaining
an interview with the proprietor of
the fashionable restaurant.
"But, my man," expostulated the
latter, noticing the seedy appearance
of the dusty musicians, "I don't se«
how 1 can use your talent. Why, w«
only engage orchestras direct from
Hungary."
"Veil, ve vas der nexd ding to it*"
responded the leader without a smil».
"The next thing to it?"
"Yah, mein herr. Ve vas nod an
orchestra from Hungary, yed, but va
vas a hungry orchestra."
And they got the job.
igjs No Place for Him.
Ail office seeker, meeting Mayor
Gaynor of New York as he was walk
ing across the Brooklyn bridge,
thought it would be a good opportu
nity to brace him for a job.
"Good morning, your honor," began
the man. "I would consider it a great
favor if you would—"
The man got no further, for the
mayor looked him over and said.
"Good morning, sir. I know your face,:
but I can't place you."—Judge.
Evidently Pleased.
"I suppose papa acted just awful
when you asked him for my hand,
Sidn't he?" queried the fair maid, who
happened to be the eldest of six
daughters.
"Well," answered the young man in
the case, "he tried his best to control
bimself, but he displayed all the symp
toms of a man who had just received
letter from home containing money."
Plugging Along
"Well, and how are you getting
along these days. Brother Smith?"
"Just plugging along, deacon, just
plugging along"
"I knew that"
"How did you know it?"
"You put a plugged quarter in the
collection plate Sunday."
VERY DANGEROUS.
V-
Mrs. Bug—Hey, there! what do you
mean, smoking on my woodpile?
A Poor Player.
The man who shifts
And harbors doubt,
In this old world
Is soon struck out!
?w^X?7rT^Tp!!5j«5
"***. +t.
Retort Courteous.
The young man in the parlor scene
was a K. of P. and the fair maid was
examining the charm on his watch
chain.
"What do these letters, F. C. B.,
Stand for?" she queried.
"Fools can't belong," he answered.
"Then how did you ever succeed in
Joining the order?" she asked.
Chaff.
"Sow the wind and you'll reap the
whirlwind," said the moralizing per
son.
"The weather man sows the rain
and lets us reap the slush," remarked
the individual with a borrowed um
brella.
Not a Lover of Cold.
"There are no cats in the arctic
circle."
"That's a fortunate thing for the
Eskimos."
"From my point of view it is a for
tunate thing for the cats."
Proof of Its Power.
Singleton—But I thought you didn't
believe in hypnotic power?
Wedderly—I didn't until my wife
came home with a necktie for me last
week that a clerk had Induced her to
purchase.
Problem Solved.
"One-half of the world doesn't know
how the other half lives," quoted the
Philadelphia woman.
"On her alimony," replied the other
woman, who had just returned from
Reno.
Communion.
regarding
"What are your ideas
final exams,"
"The same as the fellow's who sits
next to me."—Minnehaha.
Not That Kind.
"Did you seet where the railroads
ire advertising a broiler train?"
"That must be the one the chorus
a-avels on."
Its Definition.
"What is an Italian vendetta?"
"It's one of them new fangled
porches around thq new style cot
tages."
To the Point.
"What's his principal want?"
"Want of principle,**
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I want you to know I will
take your Produce, Poultry
and Eggs, and pay you the
Highest Market: Prices.
Captain W. A. Fitch, one of the
most practical fruit men of the Mer
cedes section, states that be is
charmed with the possibilities for
the growing: of citrus fruits in this
Valley. In his orchard of three acres
Capt. Fitch has growing orange, le
mon, grape fruit and fig trees. In
orange trees be has the following
varieties: two hundred Satsuruas
and three hundred of the Pineapple,
Baby and Mediterranian Sweet, and
three hundred and twenty of the
grape fruit. These trees are all
grafted on citius trifoliata Btock
and are growing beautifully. They
were planted one year ago last Jan
uary and during the past winter
the thermometer registered as low
as 23. Capt. Fitch states that the
orange trees did not lose a leaf
that the tender branches of the
grape fruit, however, did suffer
slightly. Some of those nearest to
the canal seepage where the
growth had not been checked, were
killed back to the bank placed
around them to protect their roots.
His Villa Franco lemon did not suf
fer in the least. He also said there
are trees in hiB neighborhood three
and a half years old that this year
were bearing as many as 100 orang
es to the tree. One year ago last
January be planted ten acres in
Magnolia figs and now his trees are
yielding about ten pouuds of fruit
to the tree. Speaking of other devel
opements in the Lower Valley, Capt
Fitch says:
"Attention is now being turned to
the growing ot staple crops—corn,
cane, cotton and alfalfa. Some of
the farmers are also going in strong
on the California pink beans. Sever
al experiments made during the
last two years have proved quite
successful. From twenty to twenty
&7e bUBhele per acre were made and
they sold from 3c to 3^c per pound.
There are sixty pounds to the bush
el. This is adO-day crop and it can
follow on the same ground where a
crop of cotton has been raised and
harvested. They make more on
pink beans than on cotton. Probab
ly as many as three hundred acres
will be planted in these beans
around Mercedes this fall." Next
Excursion October 18tb.
Come in and see me.
"-»l 4 Ap y
rJ it
George E. Kellogg.
Danish Lutheran Church
Services, Sunday Sept. 25th at
10:30 a. m.
Sunday School at 9:30.
Get our prices on Steel Tanks be
fore buying elsewhere.
Exira Auto & Machine Wks.
P. K.Jensen.
For Rent
On? Hundred and sixty acre farm
well improved. Inquire of
tf First National Bank.
ForSale
A few pure bred Poland China
Boars. Call on or phone
ol3 S. G. Weaver,
Phone 11 E-2 11 Exira, la., Rt. 1.
is J'
Jr
1 ,V ft ^i
Groceries. Phone 16
I
Cotton
20m
PUBLIC SALE
'""IS
The uacieraigned will have a Clo
sing Out Stit* on his place 2 miles
north ana 1 mile west of Exira, at
John Hunier nchoolhouse, on
Tuesday, Sept. 27, 1910
Commeuciug at 10:00 o'clock, a.
tu., the following propeity:
52 Head of Live Stock
4 head of horses: 1 sorrel horse
10 yrs old weighs about 1350, 1 sor
rel horse 9 yrs old weighs about
1450,1 bay mare 7 yrs old about 1350,
1 brown horse 6 vre old weiirbB
about 1150.
13 head of cattle: 10 good milch
cows all fresh soon, 1 2-yr old heifer
1 high grade Short Horn bull, 1
yeatling bull.
36 head ot bogs: 4 old sows 2 ef
them are the Maternal Duroc Jersey
pedigreed and with pig,l thorough
bred old boar, 3 thoroughbred
spring boars, 2 boars, 26 pigs.
Farm Machinery, 1 U. S. Cream
Separator, 2 sets double harness, 2
sets fly nete, 1 saddle, 1
Household Goods: 1 Round Oak
cook stove as good as new, 1 heat
ting stove, 1 wood burner, 1 gaso
line stove 3 holes and oven, 1 new
Sideboard, 1 new book case, 1 bu
reau, 1 lounge, 1 extension table,
chairs good as new, 1 rocking
chair, 2% iron beds, 1 double iron
bed and springs, a few dozen fruit
jars, 1 20-gallon stone jar, 1 12-gal
Ion stone Jar, 1 4 gallon stone jar
and some small jars, 1 5-gallon
churn, 1 sink, 1 kitchen table, 1
washing machine, 3 tubs, 1 wring
er, other articles.
•'frw
diBC,
1 corn
sbeller, 3 cultivators, 1 3 section
harrow, 1 Deering binder, 1 deering
mower, 1 corn planter, 1 lumber
wagon, 2 bay racks, 1 Rock Ieland
bay loader, 1 hay rake, 1 corn grin-.
der, 1 Drill seeder, 1 manure sprea-'
der, 114 inch gang plow, 1 16.incfe'
Stirring plow, 1 Fanning miil, 1
spring buggy, 1 top buggy, 1 bob
Bled, 1 lawn mower, 1 grindetone,
Wire cable outfit for stacking
in
field, 8 sets of Slings, 1 feed trough,
2 watering troughs, 1 Vise and drill
combined, 1 Extension ladder 24 ft.,
45 or 55 acres corn in field, about 15
or 20 tons ot hay, 1 straw stack, 3
geese, about 100 chickens, wire
stretchi and other articles.
Free Lunch at Noon.
Terms: 12 month's time with 5
percent interest.
Uffe Henningeen
J. H. Jones, Auct. vs.3
Otto Witthauer, Clerk.
Get Col. C. E. Mertz of Manning to
cry your sale. jan 1.
Insure in the Continental Jnsar
ance Company. Theo.PATTY, Agt.
Plenty of good thresher's coal at
tf Oluf Jensen's.
Windmill pumps, tanks and sap
plies, at the
Exira Auto & Machine Wks.
P. K. Jensen
Dr. L. J. Oldaker, Dentist. Office
In the front rooms over the Chris
tensen Jewelry store. All work In
my line promptly attended to.
Election And Campaign News Free
From Prejudice.
The Register and Leader will pub
lish the news of the campaign and
the result of the election impartial
ly and accurately—without bias or
prejudice. If you want all the poli
tical and election news, send $1.00
for the The Register and Leader
daily from now to Jan. 1, 1911—in
cluding the big Sunday paper $1.50.
Harness! Harness!
Saddles, Collars, whips, hardware, all kinds of sum
mer and winter horse clothing. We manufacture our
harness and guarantee satisfaction. Repairing
promptly done.
Phone 161, J. W. ALSUP, Exira, Iowa

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