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Audubon County journal. (Exira, Iowa) 1884-1993, December 19, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Iowa

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057934/1918-12-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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AUDUBON COUNTY JOURNAL
Established September 17th, 1885.
W.H.LANCELOT, Publisher.
W. J. Lancelot, Editor and Bus. Mgr.
{Entered as second-class mail matter at
the post office of Exira, Iowa, under the
.Act of Congress of March 8th, 1879.)
I SUBSCRIPTION RATES
1
One year in advance iS $1.50
1 One year outside Iowa_.i_:_ 2 0 0
One year under any other flag
than the U. S 2i50
RATES
Display, per column inch 15 cents
I .Locals, per line 10 cents
f'
Printed Thursdays.
For the Gentlemen:
Shaving Sets, Cigars,
Razor Strops, Pipes,
Safety Razors, Ash Trays,
Military Sets, Humidors,
Smoking Sets, Bill Fold,
Hat Brushes, Cigar Cases,
Money Belts, Flash Lights,
French Mirrors, Coin Purses.
Pure Drugs.
§©1 SK
w, sen.,,,
IiOOAIi AND PERSONAL.
Mrs. Ray Faust returned to Exi
ro, Monday. She had been at the
home of her parents, Charley Wells
and wife in Guthrie Center helping
care for the family, seven of whom
were sick with the Flu.
Mrs. Abel Stone visited over Sun
day at her home and returned to
the Jake Jacobsen home, Monday
morning, where she is caring for
Mrs. Jacobsen, who is recovering
nicely from the pneumonia,
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Beers are now
nicely settled in their residence in
the south part of town. Nels Mik
kelsen and family, who lived in the
is a real pleasure when you know just what you
want before entering the store to make your
purchases. We have arranged the following
lists of Gift Suggestions so that you may check
what you wish to buy and thus avoid»the delay
caused by choosing your gifts after you reach
the store
Fancy Box Stationery, Cameras, Bibles,
Paper Weights, Clothes Brushes, Dolls.
will be pleased to have you come in and look over |i
our stock. The government urges Christmas giv
ing without reserve, so do your bit.
THE KEARNEY PHARMACY
3
T*
wuExira's Leading Drug Store.
Owing to the removal of certain re.
strictions, in the manufacture of flour,
we are now permittechjto supply
public with abetter grade.
and modernly constructed
Our mill has been entirely rebuilt,®
us in position to mak#®a flour of the#
highest grade! .V
Audubon flour sold by: Peter Hass
endfeldt, E. C. Cotton and H. P. Peter
ssSSAUDUBON MILLING CO.
house, moved to the residence re
cently vacated by Mrs. Alice Heath
Mr. Claude Kelsey, well known
in Exira, a gunner in the 94th Com
pany Aero Squadron, writes home
that he is now on his way to Ber
lin across the Rhine. He expects
to be home by the first of February
Chris Heckman Jr. is at Or
ient, Iowa this week with his
sister, Mrs. Susie Cannon
who is still sick with the Flu
and was unable to attend the
funeral of her husband, Mr.
Oliver Cannon.
For the Ladies:
Sewing Sets,'Nut Bowls,
Toilet Sets, Cut Glass,
Manicure Sets, Dishes,
Dresser Sets, Mirrors,
Crumb Sets, Wash Bags,
Perfume, Music Rolls,
Face Powders, Picture Albums,
Face Cream, Toilet Water,
Purses, Nut Sets,
Talcum Holders, Jewelry,
Jewelry Boxes.
fe/
•a
AUSU&ON COUNTY JOURNAL
A
31
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which abuts
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WALLED CITY
OF WOMEN
A little sunny village hns grown up
Inside a high wall in France within the
last year. Its square flat houses stand
In straight eveu rows and along one
side of tliR city wall is a long dormi
tory for single women. There are many
more of (hem than of the families In
the drab little houses. The village is
full of women—old, young, middle
aged—whose fqces, harrds and hair
slowly are turning yellow from the
powder which it is said will eventually
affect their lungs. But most of them
are refugees and the fact that they
are giving up their good looks, their
health, and perhaps their lives in the
munition factory, is of little moment to
them. They have come into the walled
town from ruined villages and-devas
tated farms with their frightened little
Children, their despairing old people,
carrying all their earthly possessions
In tiny bundles. In their individual
lives there is no future in all their
world there is no interest but the con
quest of the Hun.
No one comes into this little war
community that centers around the big
new munitions plant but those who
worlc. Because of the danger and the
blighting yellow powder, the work is
highly paid and all the workers are
volunteers.
The women wear overalls or apron
dresses, some of black sateen, some
nondescript. The dull garb harmonizes
with the yellowing faces and despair
ing eyes.
Into this modern walled city of de
spair the Blue Triangle has flashed the
first message of hope. The Y. W. C.
She goes on to tell of some of the
women and girls who come to the
foyer:
"There is a pretty little round, rosy
Cheeked girl here who is Just beginning
to show the effects of the powder. The
roots of her hair and her forehead are
a pale yellow. The palms of her hands
are a deep burnt orange and her hands
and arms a bright yellow.
"There is an ex-professional dancer,
an interesting girl who enjoys the
foyer and helps entertain the other
girls. There is a professional pianist
who does her bit at the noon and eve
ning hours. There is one rough-imd
ready girl who speaks English, whose
father was an innkeeper in northern
France. There is a pretty little girl
who. is engaged to a French soldier
who still is. rejoicing over the five min
utes she had with him recently during
an air raid. His mother is the care
taker here and he is one of six sons in
the war. Two of them are German
military prisoners, two are civil pris
oners In Germany and two are soldiers
in the trenches. Her home in the
north of France was destroyed and she
escaped with a small bundle of such
things as she could carry in her hands.
"There is a sweet-faced girl who
was a lacemaker in Valenciennes, who
came direct to us from the German
ridden section after a hard-experience
in getting away."
These are the women the Blue Tri
angle is helping to forget—perhaps
only for an hour at a time—the hor
rors that have blackened their hearth
stones and darkened the world.
"My foyer," the secretary wHtes,
"consists of a hail and two large rooms
with cement floors. One has a writing
table and paper, pens and ink, sewing
machines, a cupboard with teacups in
it, a large table with papers and maga
zines, easy chairs and my desk. The
other room has a piano, rriore tables,
chairs, ironing boards and a Victrola.
There are unframed French pictures
and American and French war posters
around the room. The walls are paint
ed gray and white."
Saturday evenings they sing and
dance. "First they have a chorus,"
writes the secretary, "such as 'Le Reve
Passe* or the 'Hymne des Aviateurs* or
Something equally thrilling, and at the
final notes of triumph a voice at my
ears begs, 'Un polka, rnees.' The polka
finished, there is a call for the 'Hymne
Americain' and we sing the 'Star
Spangled Banner,' (Le Drapeau Etolle)
In two languages."
These foyers have been established
In several munition centers in France.
Each one has a cafeteria, a recreation
hall and rooms fitted up as rest
rooms, writing and sewing rooms. At
night these rooms are .filled with
French girls learning English, book
keeping or stenography, that they may
work in the offices of the American
Expeditionary Forces. In connection
with each is a large recreation field or
park.
At the request of the French minis
try of war the Young Women's Chris
tian association has opened club
rooms for the sixteen thousand French
women employed in the offices of the
war department.
So successful has been the foyer
work In France that call has come
from England to the American Y. W.
C. A. to bring its Blue Triangle huts
and foyers across the channel. The
English Y. W. C. A. has established
centers for munitions workers on a
smaller scale, but after inspection of
the American work in France the four
English representatives to the Allies'
Women's congress in Paris in August,
{.officially requested that the American
W. G. A. undertake similar work in
^England.
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llllljlllllMNIf Ilflllllllll
J. M. Blackberries
A.
foyer is the only recreational center
within reach. The cars which find
cafes at the end of the line a mile
away, stop running at seven o'clock to
save fuel. The city Is three miles
from the factory.
"My problem," writes the I. W. G.
A. secretary in charge, "Is to keep the
women occupied in, the, evenings, to
give them good healthy amusement so
that they will forget their sorrows and
go to bed and sleep, physically tired
out from playing."
Exira,
Clothes sent
a -ft
ym&.
'-JAii
"V,
IftlSilllii
Discount Sale
VON MY ENTIRE STOCK. OF
Ladies' and Childrens' Coats
Ladies' Skirts, Men's Mackinaw?, Sheep-Lined
Coats and Men's and Boys' Sweaters I will give
a discount of 20 per cent for two weeks, commenc
ing
Saturday, Dec. 14th
a discount of 10 per cent on all winter Undewear,
This sale will almost make before the war prices..
So do not lose the opportunity of buying ycur
wants. :vs
A FEW GROCERY PRICES:
Dandy Laundry Soap, 5 bars for.... $ 25c
Preserves, all flavors 40c
Apple butter, No. 2 can 25c
Pear butter, No. 2 can .... 30c
Armour's Jelly, 5 lb. stone jar
J. M. Raspberries 35c
Bartlett Pears, Nq. 2 1-2 can 40c
Gold Leaf WhiteC herries, No. 2 1-2 can 50c
J, M. Pine Apples (sliced) No. 2 1-2 can. 35c
J. M. Pine Apples (sliced) No. 2 can 25o
Matches, per box 7c
Toilet Soap, 10, 12 1-2 and 15 cents
Apples, per box, extra fancy. 3.50
Apples, per barrel 7.50
Don't Forget The
DISCOUNT SALE
on those Ladies' Plush and Cloth Coats
of very Latest Style.
20 Per Cent. Dec. 14 to Dec. 30. 20 Per Cent.
H. P, PETERSON,
.CLOTHES FOR SALE..
LISTEN HERE!,,
You can order your boy a real hon
est to goodness made to measure
:1 Knickerbocker suit—Don't That
Listen Good? I should say it does
/What's more, we order tailor
fj made clothes for gentlemen, Suits,
Overcoats, Trousers, etc., with
money back guarantee, if they don't
please you with real value, quality
and service.
in to be dyed. Hats sent in to be
Cleaned and Blocked.
Come on, lets get our clothes fixed up for our re
ception for the boys coming home. Lets look clean.
THE PANTITORIDffl--Wifl Treat You Right.
«£/.--We Sell Rain Coats--
1
THE KEARNEY PHARMACY
The Leading Drug Store"!
kinds of Drugs and Toilet
Articles and Commodities
Prescriptions A Specialty
Give Us A Call
-15L,
1.35
35c
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