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Audubon County journal. (Exira, Iowa) 1884-1993, September 29, 1921, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057934/1921-09-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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WORLD'S
1
IT
BEST OF THE NEWS BOILED
DOWN TO LIMIT.
ARRANGED FOR BUSY PEOPLE
Notes Covering Most Important Hap
penings of the World Compiled
in Briefest and Most Succinct
Form for Quick Consumption.
Washington
Proposal for elimination of a cabi
net member is made In the plan for re
wganization of executive departments
at Washington, which will be submit
ted to the President and his cabinet on
September 30 by the joint congression
al committee on reorganization. The
reorganization plan contemplates
merging the War and Navy depart
ments.
Administration efforts at Washing
ton to hasten ratification of the peace
treaties with Germany, Austria and
Hungary were halted by the "irrecon
cUables.'
The government at Washington has
disposed of additional railroad equip
ment trust certificates to the amount
at $80,298,500 through the War Fi
nance corporation. This makes the
total disposed of $63,482,500.
Final enactment of tariff legislation
before the winter season appeared an
Impossibility when Senator Penrose
at Washington said that 60 days would
be required by treasury experts to col
lect tbe information desired in connec
tion with the American valuation plan.
High officials of the Ku Klux Klan
may be summoned to Washington for
Interrogation by the Department of
Justice, Attorney General Daugherty
indicated.
The' treaties, with Germany, Austria
and Hungary were sent to the senate
at Washington for ratification by
'President HuJ-ding. The treaties were
accompanied only by a brief formal
aote of transmittal.
7 With 50 members present the house
•. at Washington reconvened Wednesday,
After the opening prayer, adjournment
was taken until Saturday.
Senator Penrose reported the house
'tax bill as amended by the senate
finance committee to the senate at
Washington. The Democrats were
liven permission to file a minority re
port within seven days, and Senator
•'•La Follette obtained tbe same priv-
Uege
Participation of army flyers or army
"i flying machines in exhibition flights
except as may be arranged by the
government has been prohibited by the
War department at Washington. ..,
JS'fc'i
Transcontinental carriers will re
dace rates 18 per cent on Pacific coast
vegetables to territory east of the
Rocky mountains and as far as Chl
cago and the Mississippi, it was an
nounced by the interstate commerce
commission at Washington.
Skilled workers among Immigrants
arriving in this country during the fls
cal yenr ending last June numbered
131,774, against 69,967 during the pre
Tious fiscal year, according to Wash
ington figures.
Domestic
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William McLachiln, eight, lias van-
ished at Spokane, Wash. Playmates
said he fell into a sandpit. Thousands
of tons of sand have been excavated
and a pond dragged In the search for
the body, but to no avail.
William Graver, eighteen years old,
only son of W. F. Graver of Beverly
Hills, treasurer of the Graver T^nk
company, was killed in an automobile
accident four miles north of Ann Ar
bor, Mich.
11
A bloody finger print cleared Her-'
bert Smith, half-breed Indian, of com
plicity in Dowaglac's triple murder
Jnystery. Testimony of two experts
proved conclusively that he is inno
cent.
The body pf Mrs. Norah Johnson
Kettele of Union, Conn., who, as a
bride of a few days, disappeared from
a camp at Lake Mashapaug, where she
was on her honeymoon, on September
13, was found in the lake.
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Robert L. Bean, cashier of' the
.. Meguntlcook National bank of Cam
den, was arraigned at Portland, Me.,
na a defaulter to the amount of $257,
000 on a secret indictment returned
by the grand jury.
.One finger print, stamped in blood,
the only clue to the murder of Wil
liam Monroe, forty-eifjht, his wife,
Mary,"fqrtv-four, and their daughter,
jNeva. .se«?a?e-en, who were beaten to
ith with a ijkoil-studded club in their
ie at Dowaglac, Mich.
1
Hop Palmer, accused of having shot
and killed Millard Wright in January,
1917, at a country dance, was acquit
ted at Fayette, Mo., by a Jury in the
third trial of his case.
Floods, resulting from a cloudburst,
caused hundreds of persons in the
lowlands between Glouster and Ath
ens, O., to flee to the hills. Glouster,
Corning and Trimble suffered heavy
damage.
No wage reduction of coal miners
must be permitted, John L. Lewis,
president of the United Mine Workers
of America, declared at Indianapolis,
in his report made at the biennial con
vention. ii?
~"'t
Robbers forced entrance to the city
hall at West Frankfort, 111., and con
fiscated five stills and a quantity of
"white mule" captured by officers In
recent raids and held as evidence.
W. C. Oesterich, in charge of Demo
cratic state headquarters at Albu
querque, N. M., conceded the election
of Holm O. Bursum (Rep.) as United
States senator over Richard H. Hanna
(Dein.).
A "twister" windstorm hit the busi
ness section of Zanesville, O., and did
damage to Main street business
houses running into hundreds of thou
sands of dollars. Twelve persons were
Injured.
Chief of Police Charles Fltzmorris
of Chicago was found guilty of con
tempt of court by Judge David. He
was sentenced to five days in the
county jail and ordered to pay a fine
of $100. VT
The body of Lieutenant Commander
Emory Coll of the ZR-2 disaster was
buried at sea from the destroyer
Breclc. The burial took place about
100 miles off the New York coast.
Personal
Alfred Harris Bright, seventy years
old, special counsel for the Soo line,
died in his office at Minneapolis, fol
lowing a stroke of apoplexy. He had
been connected with the road since
1891.
John Isaac Burnham, for two years
a personal bodyguard of President
Lincoln, died at a San Jose (Cal.)
hospital after brief illness. He was
seventy-eight years old and he had
lived there for 40 years.
Foreign
W?
President Harding will spend Oefo
ber 28 in Atlanta as a guest of the city
on his way back to Washington from
Birmingham, Ala., where he is to speak
•son the preceding, clay.
Mrs. Margaret Wintrlngham, liberal,
has been elected to the house of com
mons at London for the south division
of Lincolnshire in succession to her
late husband. She will be the second
woman to take a seat in the commons,
Lady Astor having been the first.
*.
Collin, Ogilvie Cameron, former
manager of Thornton, Davidson &
Co.. Montreal stock brokers, surren
dered to the police at Montreal. He
was sought on a warrant charging him
with stealing $180,000 from his firm.
Maximilian Hardin, German author,
lias canceled his lecture tour in tlie
United States, his manager an
nounced. A cablegram received at
New York reported that Hardin was
suffering from bronchitis.
A Manila dispatch says the sultan
revealed a plot by Islam chieftains to
raise the Turkish flag In southern
Philippines and oust the Americans
and Filipinos.
Berlin
The at
Wirthx government
won another great victory when Ba
varia voters ousted the anti-Berlin
leader and named Count Von Lerch
enfeld, husband of an American.
,•-'
Leon Trotzky, soviet war minister
at Moscow, announced that Poland
has served an ultimatum on Russia,
demanding the execution of the Riga
treaty.
An engagement between a small
Spanish force and a party of Moors at
Tlrisa, in the Spanish Moroccan zone,
in which the Spanish scored a pro
nounced success, Is announced in an
official telegram.
'a*?1*
It was officially announced In Ath
ens that the Greek forces In Asia
Minor would fall back to a line of
heights to the east of Slvr-Hissar,
savs a Central News dispatch from the
Greek capital. fk fis,
A Constantinople dispatch says
Turkish cavalry has entered Slvrl-Hls
sar. Cavalry divisions also are press
ing on the Greek flank. The Greeks
.are expected to hold on to the Eski
shehr-Afion-Ivarahissar line.
The American commission found
tens of thousands of Russian famine
victims crowding southern towns after
floating down the Don and Volga riv
ers. The dead and dying are un
housed. Relief is Imperative, says a
Tlflls dispatch.
The British cruiser Urchin arrived
at Kingston, Ireland, with the wreck
age of the City of St. Louis, the Amer
ican balloon which fell Into the Irish
sea while competing in a balloon race.
A British column inflicted a severe
defeat on the rebellious Indians of
Sullidmala, near Kuravarakundu, says
an official statement Issued at Calicut,
British India.
it-
Dr. Jose C. Barbosa, publisher of
El Tiempo, Is dead at San Jose, Porto
Rlco, following nn operation.
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AUDUBON COUNTY JOURNAL
Newcomb Spoor, Frogologist
His Clan Is Attacked
William Joseph Simmons of At
lanta, Ga., has his hands full these
days defending the new Ku Klux
Klan, of which he Is the Imperial wiz
ard. He and his aids have been ex
ceedingly active In extending the or
ganization in many states, and in all
parts of the country In which it has
takfen root It is being made the object
of bitter attacks. Governors and
mayors are besought to take steps for
its suppression, and in some cases
they have aligned themselves actively
with the foes of the Klan.
Especially In the South, the or
ganization is accused of emulating
the lawless, and often brutal acts of
the notorious Ku Klux Klan which
sprang up In reconstruction days.
But whereas the older Klan had for
Its only victims the negroes, the new
organization seems to give its atten
tion mainly to whites.
What do you know about frog
ology? The best known frogologist in
the country Is Newcomb Spoor of Ber
lin, Wis., who claims to have given
nearly 50 years of his life to the study
of frogs and their habits. Several years
ago he wO0 elected a member of the
Wisconsin legislature, and he imme
diately drew up a bill and secured Its
passage, prohibiting the slaughter of
frogs and the serving of frog legs dur
ing the months of March and April.
"The frog Is one of the greatest
friends of humanity," said Mr. Spoor.
"A frog eats from five to ten grass
hoppers a day and teaspoonfuls of
mosquitoes. I have noticed that
where frogs are the thickest the crop
tonnage is heaviest. Now the frog
hibernates in a spring during the win
ter time, and during the months of
March and April Is slowly returning
to life. I found that people interest
ed in catching the frogs were scoop­
ing them out by the bagfuls during that time, so I drew up my bill and
secured Its passage. This will protect the frogs for generations to come."
Assemblyman Spoor also declares his studies have taught him that the
red clover crop would practically be a failure were it not for the bumble bee.
Spoor asserts that the proboscis of a honey bee cannot reach to the pollen of
the red clover, and that It is only the bumble bee which Is able to distribute
the pollen and fertilize red clover.
Imperial Wizard Simmons, how
ever, vigorously defends his Klan against the attacks now made upou It. He
says it does not countenance the acts of those who take the law in their
hands.
"Local committees having no connection with our order have adopted
our costume," says Mr. Simmons, "and we have suffered the blame for their
outrages.
"IVe are strictly American in spirit We are sworn to uphold the Con
stitution of the United States."
Admiral of the Fleet
All Norway Loves Olaf
Of all the royalty of Norway, the
favorite with the Norwegians is Crown
Prince Olaf. His popularity is im
mense. He was eighteen years old
last July and recently passed the ex
aminations for entrance to the uni
versity. He now has the right to at
tend meetings of the cabinet, but has
no vote. From childhood he has re
ceived typically Norwegian training
and has developed Into a genuine son
of the country of the vikings. He Is
to1!, handsome and an excellent
sJl'irtsman, having won a number of
prizes in ski jumping and sailing con
tests. In the annual Norwegian der
by, the liolmenkollen ski jumping
competition, the crown prince is a reg
ular participant.
The marquis of Milford Haven,
formerly known as Prince Louis of
Battenberg, who died suddenly the
other day, had just been promoted to
be admiral of the fleet, a tardy recog
nition of his great work in preparing
the British fleet for war, and his mas
terly strategical disposition of it
when the conflict with Germany began.
Soon after his achievement a cam
paign was started against him in the
admiralty, in which he was first sea
lord, on account of his German origin
it was taken up by the jingo press
apd his dismissal was demanded. But
the public attacks were the least part
of his punishment for his offense. He
received a thousand anonymous let
ters of the foulest description from
his British fellow subjects in return
for his services, and finally Winston
Churchill, then first lord of the ad
miralty, reluctantly accepted his res
ignation. Battenberg was placed on
half pay and his German property was confiscated by the German govern
ment.
Since then he had been In quite poor circumstances, living In a small
villa at Weybrldge. Before the war competent judges pronounced him a
naval commander of real genius. It Is sometimes wondered whether, if he
had been retained In command, the British fleet wouldn't have given a better
account of itself than It did.
Being forced out of the profession he- loved broke him down and his pro
motion was no amend for his treatment.
CW
He attended a private school
where he was treated on an equal
footing with the other pupils, and he
Is wholly free from any tendency to
self-importance. When he finishes a
course at the Military Academy of Norway the crown prince will enroll as a
student in the technical high school at Trondhjem to be educated as an
engineer..
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Eddie Foutch, 10-year-old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Foutch, Imogene,
died of infantile paralysis recently.
Official check of attendance at the
Iowa state fair, which was completed
recently, shows the total attendance
at 295,103.
Ed Sullivan, 60, was killed by a
premature explosion of dynamite be
ing used in blasting rocks on his
farm. He leaves a wife and five chil
dren.
William Koch, a retired farmer1 of
Burt, killed himself in the basement
of his home by shooting himself
through the head with a .22 calibre
rifle.
William Willet, proprietor of the
"Budweiser bar" at Lake Manawa,
was slugged by an unknown assail
ant who called him to the door of his
cottage.
A special session of the grand
jury wa3 called to hear evidence
against Bruce Henry, 19, charged
with the murder of Crip Hamilton,
taxi driver of Centerville.
Miss Kathryn Rosenbaugh of
Greenfield was badly cut about the
face when an automobile skidded into
a ditch. Twenty stitches were taken
in Miss Rosenbaugh's face.
John H. Carter, 35, lineman for the
Citizens' 'Gas and Electric company,
Council Bluffs, was instantly killed
when a "dead" wire on which he was
working became crossed with a "live"
wire on high voltage.
Santo Crachiolo, 55 of Centerville,
died of injuries sustained when he
and 10 others were burned when a
slack dump fell on them recently.
Two others are expected to die.
Bert Kinsinger has been indicted
for rape on the person of Myrtle
Bloxam. Both persons are residents
of Grundy Center. Kinsinger's trial
will probably be held in December.
Quick action saved the life of the
2-year-old son of Charles Feller of
Greenfield. The baby drank part of
a bottle of formaldehyde with which
his mother had been cleaning clothes.
William Burgess, 80 of Iowa Falls
pioneer stage driver is dead. He
drove between Decar Falls and Ft.
Dodge long before the Illinois Cen
tral was built. His wife and several
children survive.
Ellery Rhoades, 25, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Isaac Rhodes of Shenandoah,
is dead of injuries received in an ex
plosion in the government chemical
works at Baltimore, Md. He had
been employed there for four years.
Word has been received of the
death of Mrs. C. W. Sears, pioneer
Iowa woman and mother of C. A.
Sears, manager of the Mississippi
River Power Company and Alden J.
Sears, superintendent. Her sons are
both residents of Keokuk.
With the letting down of the gates
on a one-mile stretch of new paving
north of Rudd recently, a 25-mile con
tinuous stretch of paving was com
pleted. This is thq longest paved ru
ral road in Iowa and one of the
longest in the middlewest.
Mrs. Alfred Rupp o£ Waukon is ac
cused of the kidnapping of her son
from the Farley School in a petition
for divorce filed by the husband. The
Rupps separated some time ago. The
question of custody of the boy and a
girl will be contested in court.
Another oil boom has failed. Hun
ters finding an oily substance on the
surface of Blockhouse creek near Du
buque had visions of a "strike". The
excitement subsided when it was
learned that a bridge had fallen
throwing the. oil into the creek from
a tank.
Graceland College is inspired by
the new $90,000 classroom building
dedicated at the celebration of the
silver anniversary of the institution.
The building is the first of four which
will form a rectangle about a gymna
slum and administration hall accom
modating 2000 students.
Abie Kaplan of Avoca, has filed a
petition against the Manhattan Oil
Company, asking for damages of
$75,000, for injuries sustained when
the old tanks of the company caught
fire in October of 1920. Kaplan
claims that at the direction of the
company's agent he assisted in re
moving property from the place and
that while doing so one of the tank
trucks burst into flames burning him
about the face, hands, neck and body
to such/ a.i extent that his facial fea
tures are almost unrecognizable.
In these times of poor sales, the
success of the George Gruber Poland
China sale in Shenandoah is good
news to stockmen and farmers. De
spite a record breaking rainstorm the
night before a large crowd was at
the sales pavilion. Thirty-four head
of sows were sold at an average cf
'$'57. The top price for a boar was
$150 paid by Earl Howard and he
also paid the top price for a sow,
$140. A litter of seven prize win
ners shown at the Shenandoah fair
brought $632.
The Iowa Public Welfare league
will maintain a home for working
girls who are not yet self-supporting,
it was announced to the Public Wel
fare bureau. It has purchased a $25,
000 home in Des Moines which will be
remodeled at once, and will have
rooms for thirty girls.
A sturdy line pole saved a number
of people from death who were rid
ing on the Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and
Northern Railway recently. The car
jumped the track at a crossing and
half turned when it struck the pole
which was strong efiough to hold it
while the passengers got out.
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WONDERFUL GAIN IN
WEIGHT REPORTED
Voung Woman Only Weighed 79
Pounds—Now Weighs Over 100
and Is Gaining Every Day.
"Before I began taking Tanlac I only
tveighed 76 pounds, I now weigh over
one hundred and am gaining every
Say," said Miss LaRue Davis of Chat
tanooga, Tenn.
"I bought my first bottle of Tanlac
at Gas City, Ind., and it helped me so
much that I continued using it. I have
always been very delicate and suffered
a great deal from stomach trouble and
rheumatism. I rarely ever had any ap
petite and simply could not relish any
thing. I fell off until I only weighed
76 pounds and was so thin I looked
perfectly awful. This is the condition
I was in when I began taking Tanlac.
"Oh, I feel so different now. Even
my complexion is improved. My appe
tite is good and I can hardly get
enough to eat. Tanlac Is simply grand
and I can truthfully say It is the only
medicine that has ever done me any
good."
Tanlac Is sold by leading druggists
everywhere.—Advertisement.
No Argument.
"Do you deny that we are descended
from monkeys?"
"If you want to claim that descent,
old man, I won't dispute you.. Why
should I argue with you about your
family tree?"—Louisville Courler-Jouir
nal.
If You Need a Medicine
You Should Have the Best
Have you ever stopped to reason why
it is that so many products that are ex
tensively advertised, all at once drop out.
of sight and are soon forgotten? The
reason is plain—the article did not fulfill
the promises of the manufacturer. This
applies more particularly to a medicine..*::
A medicinal preparation that has real .'
curative value almost sells itself, as like%
an endless chain Bystem the remedy it
recommended by those who have been
benefited, to those who are in need of it.
A prominent druggist says "Take for
example Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, a:
preparation I have sold for many years
and never hesitate to recommend, for in
almost every case it shows excellent re-'
suits, as many of my customers testify.
No other kidney remedy has so large ai
sale."
According to sworn statements and'
verified testimony of thousands who have
used the preparation, the success of Dr.
Kilmer's Swamp-Root is due to the fact,'
so many people claim, that it fulfills al
most every wish in overcoming kidney,
liver and bladder ailments corrects uri-
nary troubles and neutralizes the uria
acid which causes rheumatism.
You may receive a sample bottle of
Swamp-Root by Parcels Post. Address.
Dr. Kilmer & Co., Binghamton, N. Y.,'.
and enclose ten cents also mention this
paper. Large and medium size bottles
for sale at all drug stores.Advertisement
The Dog and the Cat.
"Has your wife any pets?"
"Yes, but I'm not one of them."—•£
Detroit Free Press.
Ci
ppfSff
Of course
you know
the reason
why millions
like
Lucky Sttjke
Cigarette
because
it's toasted
which seals
in the real
Burley taste
j?
SQUEEZED
TO DEATH
When the body begins to stiffen
and movement becomes painful it a
is usually an indication that the
kidneys are out of order. Keep
these organs healthy by taking
COLD MEDAL
immEHa
Thfc world's standard remedy for kidney)
liver, bladder and uric add troubles.
Famous since 1696. Take regularly and
keep in good health. In three sizes, all
druggists. Guaranteed as represented.
Look for the name Gold Medal on evuy bol
and accept no imitation
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