OCR Interpretation


The Buchanan County guardian. (Independence, Buchanan County, Iowa) 1858-1864, September 02, 1858, Image 4

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Cj)£ $ousc anil $aim.
Plant White Tarnips.
We repeat olir advice to you, farmers,
to plant turnips. You will need all your
spare corn—you that have any to spare—
to feed your hogs and horses for the oat
crop will amount to nothing. A vast
amount of hay has been damaged your
straw will be of an inferior quality, and
what substitute have you, except turnips
By all means plant iu drills, and we would
recommend the white varieties. Broad
cast sowing does not pay. Haifa pound
will seed an acre. Those who have not
already planted their turnips, should
choose a piece of mellow ground harrow
it thoroughly, make furrows from twenty
to thirty inches apart, and cover with a
brush—letting the horse walk between
the rows. Shortly after turnips come up
they are liable to be attacked by flies and
bugs. Ashes sprinkled upon the plants
is a pretty good protection. Light prairie
soil, especially if new, is excellent for
turnips. As corn is generally thin, it
would be well, when there is no other
vacant ground, to drill turnips between
the rows. They may easily be covered
with a garden rake. In gathering the
crop, let one person go ahead with a sharp
hoe and cut off the tops, and another fol
low with a good spade and dig them out.
Gather and lay them away the same as
potatoes. They will stand considerable
frost but should be gathered when you
gather winter apples.—Prairie
Amp. 6th.
Farmer
Beets and Carrots*
THOSE
farmers who raise these crops
for winter feed for stock, if they have
continued the practice for a number of
years, need no arguments to convince
them of the economy and value of root
crops. The yield per acre of either beets
or carrots when put in at the proper sea
son on ground rightly prepared and suit
ed to their wai.tj, is enormous, wheu com*
pared with most other crops. As fc~d
for farm houses in winter—a season when
tbey are comparatively idle, we would
pui fer to feed on half carrots, to all oats
or corn, and as with proper culture 500
to 1000 bushels per acre of carrots can
be raised on any soil that is rich, deep
and light, the saving to the farmers will
be at once perceived. We speak from
long experience when we urge upon farm
ers the importance of paying more atten
tion to tbis crop, every where else more'
highly valued than at the West. Ani
mals are as much benefitted by eating
such vegetables in winter as are human
beings their health is always improved
by change and variety in their daily diet.
The great reason why so many farmers
are dissatisfied with their attempts to raise
these and like crops, is mainly the result
of careless culture. To raise fine crops
of beets or carrots they should be careful
ly thinned out and the cultivator run
through the rows once a fortnight at least,
from the time the rows can be seen until
frost comes. In a season of drouth it will
pay to double the dose. Let us hear from
the few farmers who do grow these crop®
successfully.
OTEK THE CELLARS.—Yes, let the cel
lar have a good airing in every corner—
root bins and every spot where vegetable
matter of any sort may have been. If
there is a damp or mouldy spot anywhere
clear it out keep up a ventilation several
days and then whitewash it, sill and post,
side wall and ceiling. The cellar is gen
erally the part of the house where the
master of the house will hold undisputed
sway, and here he ought to set an exam
ple of neatness, cleanliness, and order,
that will not only bo comfort in itself but
a practical lesson. How often it is other
wise A heap of leaves thus dropped
from the decaying cabbages, rotton vege
tables of various sorts, rotten boards and
nails, old barrels, rusty brine, fish and
pork casks, and a thousand and one
things are too apt to crowd the corners,
and skulking in darkness breed disease
in the household, afford nests for vermin,
and are no more touched than would be
a nest of bumble-bees. Don't let this re
main so another day, go with barrow
and shovels, and brooms, and finally with
whitewash, and make a renovation.
PICKLED TOMATOES. Take siilafl
smooth tomatoes, not very lipe scald
them until the skin will slip off easily,
and sprinkle salt over them. After they
fetand twenty-four hours, drain off the
uice, and pour on a boiling hot pickle,
compose*! of one pound of 6ugar to ev
«ry quart of vinegar, and two tea-spoons
each of eitniamon and cloves. Drain off
the liquid, scald it and pour it on them
again, cvciy two days for a week, and
(Wr will require no further cure.
CCSTAHU IN CUPS.—Boil one pint of s
rich milk with a small portion of ciuna
mon in it when cold, mix in four eggs I
AVOII beaten—and spices and sugar to
vour liking. Mix •li veil together, and'
bake in cups.
IXDCATIejXS OF HORSE'S DISPOSITION.
—A long thin neck indicates a good dis
position,. contra wise if it be short and
thick. A broad forehead, high between
the ear*, indicates a very vicious dUpoai-
DUBUQUE-
Fulton City Dubuque & Minne
apolis
PEOPLE'S LINE,
F^ROM
Chicago to Upper Mississippi via
Chicago, Fulton City and Minne-seta Pac
ket Co. Steamers, affording to the traveling pub
lic a quick and re-liable transit to till points on
the routes, and rendering Convenience unsur
passed ly any other Lino. The advantages of
Transporting Merchandize
Over this Route is manifest, viz avoiding the
Frequent Delays
Of handling. so usual by other lines, and giy
ing more satisfaction to owners and cousignees,
by landing Goods on
OXJH, T.ir'.y J=UB.
The rates of freight are equally satisfactory.
The Boats composing this lino are commodious
and commanded by experienced and gentleman
ly officers.
For information respecting the arrival and
departure to and from Dubuque, inquire of the
agents.
Murk Good* Care People's Line, via Fultou
City."
1). P. POWRR
HUDSON BURR,
WILLIAM W. JOMtPtty
A1.SO
S o a e o w a i n
AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Levee, bet. 2d 3d 8tS.,
JDTTIRTTQ.TXIE v IOWA
je27'5i -ly
TO THE PRINTERS
THE
N O W E S
Typ« «M4 Press Famishing Depot.
W. -A., ADAJ^S,
GENERAL FURNISHING AGENT,
No. 50 Main st. Nonpareil Office, bet. 3d 4th
DUBUQUE, IOWA.
IS
now fully prejwretl to furnish tlie emfl pne
others with every article required in print
ing office, from the justly celebrated foundry oi
L. Johnson fe Co., Philadelphia, or from N. Ly
mail's Buffalo Foundry.
Those wishing to purchase .iew offices entire,
or to refurnish old ones, can procure theirsup
plies from me
AT FOUNDRY PRICES,
And thus saT» all risk to tbis point.
I keep on hand an assortment of
PLAIN & ORNAMENTAL
K 8
A* assortment on hand of the best manufacture.
HAND AND POWER PRESSES,
From New York and Philadelphia. Also
RUGGLES' PRINTING MACHINES,
Of all kinds, at as reasonable terns as they can
be got anywhere in the West.
Being a practical Job Printer of some years
experience, Printers can depend upon getting a
good article, as I am determined to furnish the
best of everything and do all business in a way
that must-be entirely satisfactory,
I keep Specimen Books, and sheets of the la
test styles of TyjH-, Ornaments, fcc., and an im
jiortant item of saving can be made ly all wish
ing to purchase.
WAREROOMS AT THB
Nonpareil Book & Jcb Printing Estab
lishment,
No. 5G Main
Sireet. Dubuque,
it
Sc.
CO.
Forwarding A Commission Merchants,
Jy«7-t0 No. 30 Levee, Dubuque.
J. gTEWART LOVE,
i.
GORGAS BULLOCK.
BULLOCK,""JOSEPH' & CO,,
Successors to G. W. Burton fc Co.
PRODUCE & PROVISION,
JOB
WICKS,
TYPE
BORDERS, CUTS, LEADS, FUR
NITURE, CASES, CHASES,
BRASS AND
WOOD RULE,
(fee.
Also on hand a large assortment of
WOOD TYPE,
From the establishment of D. Knox fc Oo., Oh jo
These Type are well finished, and will be solo
in Dubuque at New York Prices, and warranted
perfect..
Iowa.
P. w7be BERARD & C0~~
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Drugs, Medicines, Paint*, Oil-, Window
UlaftK, Groceries, Dried 1'i uils, utit fee.
No. 6 MAIN ST., DUBUQUE, IOWA,
my&'l-1 y
E. MULLKR,
BOOKBINDER, RULER
ANJ»
lib AN K HOOK MANUFACTURER.
Port-Folios, Boxes, and all kinds of Fancy
Work manufactured at the sign of the Big lilanu
Hook. Cor. Mr:n and Sixth street., Dubuque,
Iowa.
German Book*, Mu«ic, Drawing & Writ*
ing Paper For Sale*
N. B.—Persons who left work with F. A
Busseiner may liikd it at tbis place. dec!3ly
o s e n S
OF THE
Dubuque Daily, Tri-Weekly &
Weekly Times.
The j.ul'lieation of the DUBUQUE DAILY
TIMES—an Evening Paper—will lie com
menced on or liefore the iirst day of June next.
It will IK- printed on a large, ciglit column sheet,
of the best piality of paper, and with new type.
In Polities it will be Indeptitdrtil Rpublican, and
will contain till the latest political, Commercial,
Local and other News.
The TRI WEEKLY TIMES will be issued
on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday evenings,
and will contain all the News ana Editorial
matter of the Daily.
General Intelligence and Editorial matter of the
Daily, it will embrnae a condensed summary ol
the events of interest, and the Agricultural pro
gress of every county in the State that can be
heard from, arranged under the heads of the rc
sjective Counties. It will also contain a large
amount of Miscellaneous reading, adapted to
the Family Circle, aud ospocialljf ja tb« v*Bts
of the Farming community.
The WEEKLY TIMES will be issu"d every
Wednesday morning, and will lie a hiiih-toncd
FAMILY NKWSI-AI'KB. In addition to the latest sieians in this country and in Europe have been
I 8
DAILY, $7 per annum, in advanct.
TH I WEEKLY, 4
WEEKLY, 3
Or ufter six month*.
BALDWIN'S HOTEL,
Cor. of Gtrovo & 2d Street,
FAVBItAMi, IOWA.
N. ti C. A. BALD WW, Proprietors.
•lye
AVER'S
CATHARTIC PILLS,
(SUGAR-COATED,)
ARE MADE TO
CLEANSE THE BLOOD AND CUBE THE SICK.
Invalids, Ftathrrw, illotherS, Phynl
IMiiliiutliropifelH, naA
their i ffect!.aiidjiiri^e
of llirir 1 irtucs.
FOE THE CURE OF
Headache, Kirk licadachdi Ifoul
MolllSK'tl.
PITTSBIIUI, PA., May 1.1855.
0
J. AYER. Sir I have been repeatedly
Da. J. C. A YER
eared of the
by a dose
from a foul stomach, whtch tbey cleanse at once.
If they will cure others us tliey elo me, the fact is
worth knowing.
Yours with great resrcct, ED. W. PREBLE,
Clerk of Steamer Clarion.
Billions Disorders and Liver Com*
lluiiits«
SIB:Ihave used your Pills in my general and
hospital practice ever si net- you made them, and
cannot he-sitnto to say they are the best cathartic
we employ. The regulating action on the liver
is quick and d'vided, consequently they are an
admirable remedy for derangement-- of that or-
fMous
an. Indeed, I have seldom found a case of
disease so obstinate that it did not readily
yield to them.
Fraternally yours, ALONZO BALL, M. D.,
Physician of the Marine Haspi ta
Sjrienterr, Relax, and Worms.
Lry. Co. Micu., Nov. l(i, 155$
Da. AyEH: Your Pills are the jierfeetion of
medicine. They have done my wite more good
than I cm tell you. She had been sick and pin
ing away for months. Went off to be doctored at
great expense, but got no better. She then
commenced takiug your Pills, which soon cured
her, by expelling large quantities of worms
(dead) from her body. They afterwards cured
her and lior two children of bloody elyrenterv.
One of our neighbors had it bad, aud my wife
cured hini witii two doses of your Pills, while
othei.- around us paid from five to twenty dollars
doctor.:' bills, and lost much time, without be
ing cured entirely even then. Such a medicine
as yours, which is actually good and honest,
will be prized here.
GEO. J. GRIP FIN, Postmaster.
ladifetlion and Impurity of tbe
Blood.
From Rev. J. V. Himes, Pastor of Advert Church,
Boston.
Da. ATE*:I have used your Pills with extra
ordinai y success in my family andrmong those
I am called to visit in distres. To ivgulnte the
organs of digestion and purify tie blo.nl they are
the cry best remedy] have known, and lean
i confidently recommend tlieiii to aiy fi i nds.
Yours, J. V.1I1ME8.
WARSAW, WYOMIXO CO., N. Y.( Oct. 21. 1&55.
DE \A SJU I am using your Cathartic Pills in
practice,, and find them an excellent purgative
to cleanse the system and purify the fountain of
the blood.
JOHN G. MEACHAM, M. D.
Erysipelas) Scrofula, King's Evil,
Tetter, Tumors, and Salt HHrum.
Fn ,iu a Forwarding Merchant of St. Louis, Feb.
4, i«:,G.
Dr. AYER Your Tills are tbe paragon of all
that is great in medicine. They have cured my
little daughter of ulcerous sores upon her hands
and feet that had proved incurable for years.—
Her mother had been long grievously alllieted
blotches and pimples onherskinand in her hair.
Af^er our children was cured, she also tried yonr
Pills and they have cured her.
whatever.
Prepared by DR. J. C. AYER,
Practical and Analytical Chemist, Lowell, »V
PRICE 25 Cm PER Box. FIVK BOXES FOR FL.
BOLD BY
E. W. WHITNEY, Qnasqncton.
R. W. WRIGHT, Independence.
HEKVKY BROS Dubuque,
J. H. Ri i i Co., Chicago. l"Iesale.
And by agents in even' town in the IJ. S.
Dr. Wm. HALL'S
BALSAM FOR TH E 1.1 .VIS,
FOR THE CLUE OF
Consumption., recline, AatKtw*,
Wastirg of Flesh, Night Sweats, Spiitinf
of Blood, Hooping Cough, Difficulty of
Breathing, Colds, Coughs, Infltwn
ia, PhiLisic, Pain in the Side,
and all Diseases of the
Lung3 is unequalled.
IT CONTAINS NO OPI I'M, CALOMEL OR
....... ^iiifiM
ASA MARGRIDGE.
Rheumatism, Nctaralgia, and Clout.
From Res. Dr. Jfoirkes, of the Methodist Epis
Church.
PCLAKI IJOUKE,JSAVANNAJI. Ga., Jau.G. 1^56.
Honored Siu I should be ungreatful for the
relief your skill has brought me if I did not report
my case to you. A cold settled in my limbs and
brought on excruciating neuralgic pains, which
ended in chronic rhuinatism. Notwithstanding
I had the best of phj sieians, the disease grew
worse and worse, until by the advice of your ex
cellent agent in Baltimore, Dr. Mackenzie, I tried
your Pills. Their effeets were slow, but sure.—
By persevering in the use of them, Torn entirely
well.
SENATE CHAMBER, BATON* ROLUE,
The Only Safe Preparation
That doe* not Dye, bat will restore
GBAY HATS!
TO ITS OHIOINAL COLOR, BY NATlRK's
i OWJi PROCESS, 18
Frof. O. J. WOOD'S Celebrated
HAffi EESTOEATIYE.
IN
proof of the above assertion, niul the fol
lowing testimony from distinguished per
sons from all parts of the country.
HON. SOLOMON MANN, Ann Harbor,
Mich., says his wife, whose hair had become
i ,, Mien., says ins wite-, whose nair nan rieeome
ver
te worst headache any lwdy c:in have
DrrAKT.Ml-NT OF THK l.NTKRlOR.)
Washington, D. C., 7 Feb., I£56 $
POST OKFICK, IIAUTLANH.I
y thin, and entirely white, was restored to
,rjgin.,i
brown
color,
or tAt o of your 1 ills. It seems to arise |K.COI)K1 beautiful and glossy upon and entirely
BECAUSE
LA.,5Dec.,'57
DR. AYER I have been entirely cured by your
Pills of Rheumatic Gout—a painful disease that
had afflicted me for years.
VINCENT SLIDELL.
For Dro?**y Plethora, or kindred
Uoii: plaints, requiring an active purge, tliey are an
exctllc.iL r.
For toslivcnrsnor Constipation, and
ns a USiiurr 1*111, tlic.v are .i-ree.il.lc .tmi e:le.:ual.
Fil.. 1'araijkis, lutlitm
mu I ioi», ami i'\ c!
i DrafnesK, t*artinl
VI mines*, li:tel.cen e in.il '. y the Aticru'.lvu action
ot Uitse l'ii!s.
M«st of the Pills in market contain ereury,
which, although a valuable remedy in skillful
ihands, is dangerous in a ]utlic pill, from the
dreadful consequences that frequently follow its
nea utious use.
mineral substr*'
Mineral Poixon |K „r. ^.F„„ully
ACCOMDINti TO DIRECTIONS,
For twenty-four cr forty-eight hours, and not
entirely satisfied with its merits,
may return it and
Receive Back their Money 11
IT HAS EFFECTED CURES
In mimereius ceses, where' the most skillful phy-
employed, »ind have e'xereised their skill in vain
Cases which they pmnounecd incurable, and
surr''ndoreel as hopeless beyond a doubt, leaving
their patients without a single ray to enliven
thi-m in their irloe in, have bttn currd by
Dr. Hall's Balsam,
BOLLElS, iSMITH & CO., Proprie
tors, 14 South Water street, Chicago, to
whom all orders should be addressed.
PRICE.—81 00 ner bottle, or 81* bot
tles for $5 00.
C. H. MILL*,
AGENT FOE THE SALE OF ALL KINDS
OF
(Drnaiiuntal fltarbU iUork,
jQUASQUETON, BUCHANAN OO,IOWA
marS-Gut
And is Safe for the most delicate Child! j«17-17-3m) I'ROF. O. J. WOOD.
Dr. Kail's Balsam 1 lion, 01, io. Sold by nil good Drug
Strikes at the root of the disease at once, and i gists.
such is its sjidedy effe ct, that anyone using it!
freely,
and had thickened and
glossy upon and entirely
over the head. Others of my family and friends
are using your Restorative with the happiest
effects.
HON. JUDGE BREESE, Ex-Senator of Il
linois, says: "My hair was prematurely gray,
but. by the use of Wood's Restorative, it
"has re
sumed its original color, and I have no doubt
permanently so.
HON. H! L. STEWART, says: "My hair
was very gray, but after using two bottles, it
restored it to its origin id color.
REV. J. K. BRAGG, Brooktield, Mass., says
it has removed from my head inflamation, dan
druff, and a constant tendency to itehi,.f, and
restored my hair, which was gray, to its origi
nal color.
J. W. DAVIDSON, Monmouth, 111.,says my
hair was two-thirds gray, or rather white, but
by the application of the Restorative as direc
ted. it has resumed its original color.
DR. G. W ALL1S, Chicago, says, after using
a great many other preparations, all to no
effect,
1
used one bottle of your Hair Restorative, which
has cured a humor in my head of two year's
standing.
BENJAMIN LONGUTDGE, 254 Seventh
Avenue, Kew York, says, having lost my hair
by the ettects of the erysijxdas, when it began
to grow instead of black, as heretofore, it was
well mixed with gmy. Having tried ninny
preparations to restore the color without effect, I
was induced to try yours, and in spite of all mv
doubts it hns had the desired effect.
H. L. WILLIAMS, M. D., Peck ens ville, Ala.,
says, 1 have u-' .t your Rcstorativc, and find it
all it is recommended to be. I have tried it for
Tetter, and find it a certain cure.
AY.il. WOOJJWAIip, M. 1 Frankfort, Ity.,
snvs lie recommends it in his practice as the
be:1-preparation i* the hair now in use.
EDWARD WALCOTT, says, three months
ago rny hair was very gray, it is now a dark
brown, the original color, smooth and glossy, all
by the use of Wood's Restorative.
WILSON KING says, one month's proper
application will restore any person's hair to its
original color and texture.
J. I). H'JES sa\*3, a few applications fastened
my hair tirmlv, it began to grow out and turn
black, i* original color.
BETSEY SMITH, Northeaat Pennsylvania,
s."y,3 that her heir lir.d for a number of ye&rs,
been
perfectly
white, but now it is restored to
it* youthful color, soft and glossy.
DR. J. W. BOND, St. Paul, says tliat his
hair ic strong, thick and black, although a short
time since Tie was both bald and gray. The
people lure saw its effects and have confidence
in it.
MORRIS GOSLING., M. D., St. Louis, says
that after trying many other preparations, all to
no effect, he used two 1
1
Kittles,
which covered his
head with a new and vigorous growth of hair,
and invites all to come and see it.
SARAH J. BROWN says her hnir was not
only gr.iy, but so thin she ten red its entire loss,
but after using two bottles it has restored both
the bolor and growth.
Prepared by O. J. WOOD A CO., 114 Market
street, Saint Louis, and 312 Broadway, New
York, and sold by all Druggists and Patent
Medicine dealers also by all Fancy and Toilet
Goods Dealers in the United States and Canada.
jel7-17-3m
WHY IS THE DEMAND 80 GREAT FOR
DR. MANN'S
AGUE BALSAM i
it will, in all eases, safely and ef­
fectually cure that much dreaded scourge
of tiie Wes —Chills, Fevtr ami Ague—without
tail, and in eases will counteract the poison of
Malaria, of which fact thousands do testify
and, unlike all other nostrums, it is only recom
mended for one class of diseases, and as a tonic
it is unsurpassed. We will offer a few eviden
ces of its worth, by men of influence and high
standing.
PRINCETON, III., Pep. 20, '57.
DR. MANN—Dear Sir: For several years
past Thave used your Ague Balsam in my daily
practice, and have closely observed its effects in
hundreds of cases, ami in no ease has it failed
to produce the most, hnppy effect. I can most
chc rfully reeominend it as a certain specific for
chills, Fever and Ague, and Malarious diseases
Truly yours, H. AUSTIN, M. D.
MARSHALL, Mich., Feb. 11, '57.
DR. MANN & CO.:—I have sold a large
amount of your Ague Balsam in this vicinity,
... and from my personal knowledge of it, I believe
i liese contain no mercury or if tha best remedy for chills, fever and ague that
has «V3Pfet*»-«o1d iu our State. Yours,
O. A. HYDE.
C.T" ASHTABULA, O., January 1, '58.
MESSRS. S. K. MANN & CO.—Gents
In canvassing the States of Ohioand Michigan,
fir the sale of the different remedies of which we
have control, our attention has been called to ob
serve the great name that your Ague Bnlsam
has gained for itself in every place w here sold.—
It really seems to be the people's own ruiwdy, and
its sales more rapid than all others. It is des
tined to supercede all other Ague remedies in
the market. V«y Truly Yours,
A. fc S. HENDRY.
NKW YORK, Feb. 23, '58.
MESSRS. S. K. MANN CO.—Gents :—I
have at our house in St. Louis sold your Ague
Bronchitis, Balsam some three years, and have carefully ob
served its effects in rrmxo, and must in all can
dor say, 1 do not believe its equal exists in all
the world of medicines. To my personal know
ledge it has cured permanently eveiy time, and
I have known it. used, after all other reruudies
had been tried in vain, with the most happy re
sult. And what is more remarkable I have never
known a case but what rummied cured for at
k:ist (hat saison. I have no hesitation in eom
monding it ns a perfect triumph over chills and
fever. Respectfully
v
I 8.
„u„.
K. MANN fc CO., Proprietors, Ga-
Beusona for taking the Dubuque Express
and Herald.
BECAESB it publishes more reading matter than
any other paper in the North-west.
BCOAUSE it publishes a greater variety of mat
ter than any other paper in the North
west.
BBCACSX it publishes more news than any other
paper in the North-west.
BECAUSE it uniformly contains later news than
any other paper.
BECAUSE it is a pajH-r well printed and always
readable.
BfagAtng it is better printed than any other pa
per.
BKCAUSK it always contains the best local re
ports.
BECAUSE it always contains the best teb'gniphic
despatches.
BECAUSE its intelligence is reliable.
BECAUSE it contains more information relative to
the Western oountry than any other
painr.
BECAUSE it is independent,and under the con
trol eif no clique or faction.
BKCAIJK it seeks to promote public and private
welfare, by disseminating knowledge
anl information on all subjects among
the people.
A11 Postmasters are our agents to receive and
forward subscriptions, to wliom money can be
raul or forwarded to the Proprietors.
J. IS. DORR & CO.
It Dubu^ae, Iowa.
Prosiirrtii* of'the Kcpublic.
A sufficient time has elapsed since the inau
guration of Mr. Buchanan, to dispel the hopes
entertained by many who did not support his
election to the presidency, that his administra
tion of affairs would be "so, moderate and con
servative ns to give repose to a country too long
agitated by exciting collisions of opinion and
interest. On the contrary, it has leen so far
marked by a violence of measures, which is
without precedent, even in the administration
of Mr. Pierce.
In Kansas it has given all its patronage, not
merely to a faction detested by the ]»_ople of
that Territory, but to tbe most odious men of
that faction, some of whom have participated
directly in the scenes of violence and bloodshed
while it has concentrated the entire disposable
army of the United States at Fort Leavenw orth,
under the command of a man of known violence
of character, for the manifest purpose of intim
idating our fellow-citizens there into submis
sion to a foreign usurpation, and if intimidation
fails, of desolating them with lire and sword.
In foreign lifiVirs it does not disgni-e its pur
pose to take immense sums from the Treasury
to lie ex]tended in the purchase of new Terri
tories, while it threatens us with comvlieatioiis
nud wars fatal to commerce, in the sole interest
of an institution deemed temporary ntid excep
tional by the founders of our Government, but
which now aspires to an eternity of duration
and to universal dominion.
The purj o.-e of Mr. Buchanan's Administra
tion clearly is to keep up tlmt agitation of the
Slavery Question, which was delilierately enter
ed upon as n matter of political calculation in
lf-54, as the bas is of a new party then formed
to control the destinies of the country that agi
tation to which Mr. Buchanan owes his own
election, and to which those who surround him
now look confidently for the perpetuation of
their own aower.
1 here are large bodies of our countrymen, in
all parts of the Union, who
deplore
this organi­
zation of a sectional party at the South,
bottom­
ed upon the revolutionary proceedings of 1854,
and still maintained by violent acts, appealing
to sectional passions who perceive that it os
tracises the moderate and conservative portion
of the eitixens of the slave holding Strifes
from
participation and influence in public affairs
and who see in this geographical arrangement
of parties the greatest dangers of all kinds, in
cluding dangers to the peculiar institution, the
sensitiveness of which is so recklessly appealed
to by political gamblers.
It is ^proposed by the undersigned to estab
lisha Newspaper at the city of \Vaahin_rton, in
which the views of those oortions of our coun
trymen may be reflected. This newspaper ill
lie styled The Republic, and will endeavor to
maintain a nationality and comprehensiveness
of views worthy of its "name.
Esteeming as the most imminent, and pressing
nalional danger, the attempt to maintain a gt'»
graphical jmrty hy pand. ring to the passions of I
the slavery propaganda, The Rrj.ullic will reso
lately oppose an Administration which has de
termined to perpetuate itself bv keeping up a i
form of party so drngerous and so odious.
An inflexible attachment totheUnion, a rev
erence for the Constitution of the United States,'
ns the highest achievement of human wisdom'
a general conformity as to doubtful ceuistnic- i
tions of the Constitution, and as to principles
of public administration, to the school of politics
illustrated by the genius of Mr. Jefferson pence
andjustiee in our foreign relations the eonsoli
nation of our civilization at home, rather than!
needless, premature or dangerous enlargements
of territory the- dedication of our present pub
lie detmain ns a theatre for the proa|eroi: indus
try of fre emen, anil, with that view, the prohib-!
it ion of its transfer except in moderate qnanti
I ties to actual settlers. Such, briefly, are the!
i principles, feelings and objects which will give
tone to The Republic
It will lie one of the aims of The Republic to
co-operate in reducing the expenditures of the
I Government, which have been swoh n to seventy
millions per annum by the extravag. nee and I
corruption of the party in power. The revenue s
of the country are mainly contributed by its
free laltor^rs, while its disbursements, of' late!
years, have IK-CU made with very little reference I
to their interests. Public employments, mili
tary, naval and civil, have become more and
more engrossed by a peculiar class, which bears I
little of the public biu-dcas, and which has thus
had a double motive to augment salaries and ex
peiiditures. i
The publication of The Republic was com-!
nienced in September last. The prices and
terms of subscription an* given below. It is ex
pccieel that a daily pubpeation will be added,'
to commence with the next session of Congress.
DAMI:L R. GOODLOE, of North Carolina, has i
been engaged to assist in the e di'orial manage
ment of The Republic, end other additions will
be made to its eoips of political and liten.rv
Terms of Subscription.
WEEKLY.
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20 copies, six months, 12 50
SEMI-WEEKLY.
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2 eo[ ies, six months, 2, 50
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It will not be required that the names of a
Club be all sent in at eiuc time, or the papers to
one pos(office. The paper will be mailed sep
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Persons volunteering to act us agents will
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Washington, D. C.
Consolldatioi
OF
EMERSON'S MAGAZINE
AMD
PUTNAM'S MONTH IA
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rl
HE Publishers are happy to announce that
.A. in the union eif these' favorite Magazines,
the best, literary and artistic tah'iit of both pub
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ive features of each will be- retained in the con
solielatcd work.
It will aim te present in its jmges the choicest
productions ef American thinkers anel writers,
ami the be'st efforts e»f American artists.
We shall e'ndeavor, by u sagacious use of the
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make a Magazine, that, in the richness of its
literary conte nts, and in the Ix'auty anel pro
fuseness of its pie-toriul illustratieins, shall emt
rival any publication eve-r before} proeluce-d in I
this count ry.
The new issue commences with the OCTO
BER numbe r, which is now ready. It is filled
with tlie choicest productions of some eif the}
most brilliant writers of tlie day, and is emlel
islicd with forty-four splendid original engrav
ings. It appears in a new dress, embracing an
elegant classical eb'sign on the cover, and the en
tire work presents the inest attractive appear
anee. It is pronounced by all who have s«*en it
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Price 25iviii.i—$3 a year.
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TY LARGE BOUND VOLUMES is presented
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j?-
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J. M. EMERSON «fc CO., Publishers.
371 Broadway, York.
Tlie Independent,
V
WEEKLY RELIGIOUS AND FAMILY
NcwBjMpcr, edited by eminent clergymen,
assisted by the following distinguished
REOl'l.AR CONTIUBUTOBS.
REV. GEO. B. CHEEVER, D. D.
REV. HENRY WARD BEECHES.
MRS. H. BEECHER STOWE,
and many others. The Independent is a largo,
double-sheet family newspaper, handsomely
printed on clear paper, and with large type', is
sued weekly and circulated in all parts of the
land—part icularly in New England, the Middle
States and the West.
Its columns are enriched and diversified by
contributions from writers of the first charac
ter and celebrity, on n wiele? range of
interesting not only to the home circle and fire
side, but also to the business, the literary and
the religious world.
Every successive nninber of the paper is de
signeil to give a weekly digest of affairs loth in
the church and in the world, ami also a great
amount of miscellaneous reading matter, enter
taining, instructing, and stimulating, for both
the young and the old.
But the chief aim of the paper is to be a
moral lower in the world—and, with this in
view, it seeks to promote every pure re form
that is now struggling for success. It is a friend
of the slave, and an advocate of his freedom,
and will use all its influence agninst every ex
isting institution ot.d every proposed public
measure which denies the humauity and the
rights of men. In seeking to promote the pro
gress of Christianity, it will inculcate the doc
trine that tin? principles of human freedom are
part of the Gospel itself.
Abo a full summary of Religious and Ger
eml Intelligence is given. Also, Weekly, an
article on the Money market and Commercial
News. Full and complete Reviews of the
Flour and Produce Market are written weekly
by an experienced man, expressly for this pajicr.
Our Prices Current are- also corrected up to the
day of publication, and may be confidently re
lied upon for correctness.
TERMS—$2 a year (in every ease) by mail
$2,50 by carrier—payable always in advance.
Specimen numbers sent gratis.
New and old subscribers will please remit at
our risk. Direct to the publisher, as we have
no agents for whom we are responsible.
Advertisements—Twenty Cents per line for
each infertion, with a discount on large bills.
JOSEPH H. LADD, Publisher,
THE
Office 22 Beekman street New York
AfSreat and Good Book for Every Fain
ilv.
NEW ILLUSTRATED HYDRO
PATHIC ENCYCLOPEDIA—A com
plete system of Hydropathy and Hygiene, in
one large volume/ Embracing Outlines of An
atomy, illustrated—Philosophy of the Human
Body—Hygienic Ageneies,aiiel the Pnse-rvation
of lien
1th—Diet' tics and Hydropathic Ceiokery
—Theory and Practice of Water Tr. atment—
Special Pathology and Hydro-The-rapeutics, in
eluding the Nature, Couses, Symptoms and
Treatment of all known I)isea« s'—Application
to Surgical Diseases—Application of Hydro
pathy to Midwif.ry and the Nursery—with
Three Hundreel Engravings and nearly one
thousand pages, including a Glossary and table
of contents, and a complete Index. P»y R. T.
THRAI.I., M. D. Published
ly
FOWI.PK WI:LI.S,
In the plan of this work, the wants and ne
cessities of the jeople have been steadily kept
in view, while r.lninost every topic of iuterest
in the Departments of Anatomy, Physiology,
Pathology, Hygiene and TherajH'utics Is hrictly
presented, those of practical utility are always
put prominently forward. The prevailing errors
whims, aiiel conceits of the day and afire* are ex
posed ami refuted. The Th-oiies and hyi*.
thesis upon which the pejpular e'rug practice is
predicate-el, are controverted, and tlie why and
the w horeloiv of their fallacy clearly demon
stin
ted. The following fs a brief analysis of its
contents
History of Medicine, Bathing and Medicated
Baths.
Anatomy, illustrated by 120 engravings.
Physiology, illuslrateei—comprising the .Ra
tionale of Muscular Action—the Nervous Influ
ence—Philosophy of Mimi—Me smeric Phenoni
eiin—Functie'iis of l)ige-stioii, Circulation, Re-s
piration, Absorption,
ii'iitiition,
Secretion, Ex-
cretiem, Calorification ami Temperaments—The
Race: of Man and Theory of Population.
Hygii lie, embracing all the il lations of Air,
Litrlit, Drink, Food, Temjx-rature, Exercise,
Sleep, Clothing, Bathing, and the Passions, to
the giowih anddevelopmantof Body anei Mind,
the Preservation of Health and tlie attainment
ejf Longevity.
Dietetics, comprising the Bile, Anatomical,
Phyniologiesal, Chemieul and experimental evi
dences concerning tlie natural dietetic character
of man.
Hydropathic cooking, with special direction*
for tlie preparation of fetoel.
Philosophy of Water Cure, with illustrated
explnnatiens of all the Water Cure Appliances,
a Philosetphical Expedition of the modus eipcr
andi of Water Treatment, and the rationale of
Drug Treatment.
Dietarie s, containing the Therapeutic Dis
tinctions of Diet for Invalids.
The Nature, Symptoms, uud Treatment of all
known Diseases are e xamined, and the ill-suc
cess drug practice exposed, and the preiper
Medication lveiouimeneleel and sjieciticd.
The Treatnie nt of Surgical Diseases Illus
trated, and directions for the miuor operations
given.
The management of Lying-ia Women and
tlie Treatment of children, Ac.
The work is intended to be plain. Intelligible
and a sufficient guide fer Domestic Practice er
Home Treatment, in all orelinary Diseases, cm
bracing the whole range of subjects connected
with the Philosophy ef Life, the Preservation
of Health and the Treatment of Diseases.
This great work may IKS had in one large vol
ume, hetund iii Library style. Price, pre-paid
by mail to any peist-omce in the United States,
only Three Dollars.
All letters and Orde-rs should be directed to
FOWLER A WELLS.
No. .'MI8 Broaelway, N.Y.
KT Agents in every lie-ighborhood will le
supplieel iu packages eifa dozen or more copies,
by express or as freight. Single copies by
mail. Every family should have a copy.
Editors ceipyingthi- above a fe *.v times, inclu
eling this nate, and calling attention to the
same, will be entitled to a copy of the work, de
liverable to their order, at Mtt Broadway N. Y.
CIRCULAR TO LAWYERS.
PUBLISHING HOUSK OF LUSE, LANE A Co.,)
Davenport, Iowa, Aug. 1857.
\\7E ARE ABOUT TO PUBLISH A LAW
BOOK which we think will be a neces­
sity to every Lawyer in the- State. It is to in
brace the orgiiiiie1nwofWiscein8in,of Iowa, the
old arol new Constitutions eif this State, the Code
and all General Statutes inelueiing tliewe t« be
Ileferencts
tasscd at the next Gene ml Assembly. Marginal
will be made te ivpoited de-cisions of
the Supreme Court e.f tlu- State of Ie.wa, on all
sections of Statutes which have receive con
struction and iu aeblition, where Code: Sections
relate te Practice- alone, anel ure similar, or sub
stantially like the se of New Y*rk, en- any either
State copious notes of decisions in such State,
as we-11 as this, will be subjoined. It will be
•aen that tbis plan is comprehensive—tlie Book
sere to be ve-ry valvable—yet we think we shall
be able tost-11 it feir Five Dollars. That the work
will lie- well and thoroughly demo we are entirely
satisfie-d, ns it is to be prepared by Hon. JOHN
M. BRADFORD, recently Judge' in the County*
of Ontario, Kew York, but now a resident of this
State. Yours Respectfully,
LUSE, LANE A CO.
DUBUQUE CITY MARBLE WORKS
N E I K
KKA1.KR IN
AMERICAN 4 FOltEIG.V MARBLE,
Sixth Bt. bet. Main & Iowa, Dubuque, Iowa.
FAIIKRT¥ & -R W
FORWARDING, COMMISSION
And Liquor Dealers,
Iowa street next door to the corner of Third.
a y 3 U U U E O A y
7.TT7
I
v'
I U A
State Historical Socici
OF IOWA.
THE
subjects,
SOAR!) OF CURATOKS- OF
Suite Historical Society of Iowa invita
your attention to its objects, condition and pros
pects. The Legislature o»" this State, at its lsat
session, in the true spir: i enlightened legfiN'
lation, granted the Seeictv an annual appropri
ation of $250, to aiel iu collecting Works and
Dex'uments, anel spreading iuforinotion relutiva,
to the* histeiry and progress oi Irwa. This fund
although small, places the society on a firm ts
sis, and will ensure the commencement of tiM
ceill etion of a Library of Western History
which we may feol proud.
Our State is in its infancy, but no State htt
the prospect of a brighter or more glorious fu
ture. Let us commence m»w to collect and pus
se-rvc whatever may ttmd to elucidate its history
anel progress. Indeeel, what is m»t seion secto
red will in a few years le beyond our reach/—w
The jast is rapidly receeling, which admonishes
us tolie-gin at once, if we would preserve a faith
ful reeerd ef passing events, and keep alive the
memory of the meritejrious men who have COGL
tribute-el or may he-rcafter contribute to moutdT
the rising destinies of Iowa. .!
We le sire, therefore, to procure, preserve and
constantly augment a public collection of Books,
Manuscripts anel either memorials of the hi»tory
of this whole re?gien, and especially of onrovit
State. As this demand is urgent and import
ant, we earnestly appe al to our fellow-citizens
of this State and literary friends abroad, for
their liberal anel generous ceuitributions to 0W(
library and collections. The various kinds of
materials wanted are— it
1. Manuscript statements of pioneer settiod^
old letters ana journals, relative to the eailjr
history and settlement of the State bieigrapldeH
anel notices of eminent citizens, deceased and
facts illustrative of euir Indian tribe s, their his
tory, characteristic sketches of their promineAt
Chie fs, Orators and Waniors,
together with coa»
tributions of Indian implements, dress, orna
mentsnml curiosities.
2. File* of e.hl newspapers, Books, Pamphlet^
College Catalogues, Minutes of Ecclesiastic
Conventions and Synods, and other publications
relating to the early history of the State*.
3. Information respecting any ancient cofefeS
orother curiosities found in this State. Draw*
ing« and descriptions of any ancicnt mounSli^
or fortifications are re-spectively solicited.
cns
i
,j
4. Indian geographical names of streams
localities in the State, and their signification,
5. Books of all kinds, and especially such M1
relatw te American History, Travels and Bidfr
raphies in general, anel in the West iu particu
lar family geru-alogies, old magazine's, paniph"-'
U'ts tilts eit newspapers, maps, historical maa-j.
useripts, autegraphs e.f distinguished persons,
coins, medals, paintings, portraits, statuary utitf
engravings. ,,[
6. We solicit from Historical Societies ajyi
other learned lxdies, that, interchange of 'Bevjlr'f
and either mate rials by which the usefulness of.
Institutiems of this nature is so much enhanced,
pledging ourselves to repay such contributions
by acts kind to tlie extent of our ability, JS'C
7. The SeK'icty particularly begs the
and compliment of publishers ana authors,
present., with the ir autographs, copies of tMult
resjuetive works for tlie Library.
8. Editers anel publishers of newspapdTi,
magazines anel reviews, will confer a lasting
favor on the- Society, by contributing their pub
lica'-iems regularly to its Library—or, at least,
such numlieTs as may contain articles bearing
upon leiwa history, biography, geography and
antiquities all of which will be earcfuliy prs
serveel tor binding. 'v
We ivspeel fully re quest that all to whom this
circular is addressed, will be disposed to glT*
to our appeal a generous response. Donors to
the Society's Library anel cedlcctions will ^be
placed on the list of exchanges, a id receiva
equivalent publications of the Society, the II
sue of whicli will soon be cornmeneeef and reg
ularly continued. It is xtry desirable that all.
doners should ferwarel to the Corresponding
Secretary a specification of books and articles
st-nt to the Seieiety.
We are making preparations for a picture gal
lery, unel have alivuily secured some valuable
pictures from extinguished men. We have also
many promises of valuable articles for our cabi
net of historical curiosities. The Board of Ctt«
rators meet in the Seciety's rooniB, em tlie first
Tuesday evening of each month.
Hem .1 AMES W. GRIMES,
Hon. S. J. KIHKWOOP,'
Htm. F. H. LKK,
Hon. II.
W. GRAT,
PRESIDENT.
Vies Pmideats*
Hon. C. F. CLAMOW,
Hon. E. PRICE.
Jou.v PATTEE, Librarian.
REV. C. BILLINGS SMITH, Cor.S«4
THOMAS HUGHES, Recording See'j
J. P.
WOOD, Treasurer.
Hons. John Shane, D. I?. Palmer, D. W.
Chas. N«*gus, W. F. Cendbaugh, S. H. LaBf
worthy, F. W. Ballard, M. B. Ceichran, H. D.
Downey, E. K. Hugg, Wm. Vogt, T. S. Parvin,
W. Penn Clarke, S. C. Culbertson, G. D.
in, G. W. McOlcary, Le
Wood-
Grand Byington, &.A
Winchister, Curators.
Iewa City, June, 157. MJy
PROSPECTUS OF THE PBAIBIE FABMgJk
FOR 1868.
I^HE
Prairie Farmer is the leading Agrieul^
tural )aper published iu the NorUiwsM.
It hedds that honest labor is tlie foundation of
oil lasting preispe^lity, and that the working
man should be enlightened, honoreel and r«
warded. The labors eif the Prairie Farmer^ars
divided inte three deportments.
I. It strives to te-neli the best methods of in).
proving tho farm,its soil, its buildings, itsjpao*
ducts, its live stock, its conveniences andl ito
comforts.
II. It believes that fair prices for farm pro*
ducts are just as essential to tlie farmer's pros
perity as large crops and fat cattle. It labors
to lie"ip him to secure the best market for his
products, and to prevent the middle xnaa fpon
taking too much toll for his services.
III. It lalieirs to enlarge his stock of
to improve his understanding, and while
ing
ideas,
avoid­
partisan politics, to teach him true political
economy.
In addition to a vast amount of agricultural
information, tbe columns of the Prairie Farmer
give the- ne-ws ef the' day, both home and foreign.
The variety is such, that a family need take no
either city patytr, and yet U- well informed oa
the current e-vents anel tojiies of the day. The
art of condedsing is practised, by which a great
deal can be give:n in a small space.
One jHirtion of tbe Prairie Farmer eliscussce
farming u se-eonl gardening u third mechanics
a fyurtli household economy a fifth the market*!
very full anel ae-eurate a sixth lex'nl news, and
news by tele-graph anei mail a seventh devoted
to interesting literary matter, and an eighth to
educational topics for the young to all of which
is added a large number of excellent, practical,
and instructive commuiiicatieins, on various
teipies, each week. The Prairc Farmer hat a
larger circle of contributors than any other agri
cultural pa}*r in the United States.
TERMS OF THE PRAIRIE FARMER.
1 copy 1 year in advance, 9,00
3 COPIES! 6,00
4 »:•. *91 -'©,00
0
I •?*. *5.00
A 1 to one address, ^5,00
K7* The Prairie Farmer will be sent TWO ysars
to one subscriber for $3 in ael vance.
ID* And eild subfcribcr tending OJT* MW
name and $3 in advance, will reoeive two eopiss
—one for himself and one forhis friend.
IP' The Prairie Farmer will be sent on Uial
for thre'e months for 25 cents.
Address PRAIBIK FAKMEH," Chicago,
Whole-sale
efc Retail Dealer in
HARDWARE, CUTLER*,
Farming Tool* ft Housekeeping Goods, -•.
Affrnt for Little Uiaatt Lswdi
Wire Fencing.
NO. 145 MAIN STREET^
1 #l
MVSC^TI N£, IOWA.

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