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Buchanan County bulletin and guardian. (Independence, Iowa) 1866-1869, March 19, 1867, Image 1

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GUARDIAN, VOL. 10, NO. 52.
I K U I I E I N
J. I. 1,00IIl», KlUTOR pROPRItTOft.
Kpw
I Inditing,
«t" M'f (nut Stmt*.
RitM «r Advert
lalMgJI
ffelt SUt# u ton linea of solid krrvicr, HjuiTal*Lt
•f eight Uno* of minion, the ty|»«* of this paper.
BUSINKSS CARDS.
J. 8. WOOnWARP,
jrroii^*er .IT
M~MW,
G£NKUAL LAM)A(JI«NT,
Il«DKPR!(nK!('P., IOWA.
WF1CF. IN WILCOX' BLOCK.
Hwttealar attention (imto ewUeotioas, aad
nalttinm promptly mate.
n. n. iioi.nituxiK,
Mtrnm*}/
«ms4
Connsef*rMt Late,
N
otary
pust ir
ami
REAL ESI ATE AGENT
Will (ire especial attrntic* to Cullectioni
will |itjr tain, examine title*, collect rtali, and
Mil r*al *stat*.
ALSO, i.ii'KVPffrt
Gorfrnment Olnim igent.
Will prosecute and nil claim* agniTit-t
the including
Ptati'im,
Back
BOHUovemmeat,
nil/. t('\
Orrn
r.
i*
Bates
Myers' Store.
LICENSED Al'CTIOVF.E*,
Independence, Iowa.
Wofevery
ill Mil Real Kutftte and Personal Property
dewrlption. Batlafaetioa f«ar
anteed.
W. S.*' I. It. HONS' \\.
LAW. COIf EVAKC IXQ,
WAR CLAIM. INSURANCE,
Hkt
aud Em*6 .twenty OMtee,
{Office in Leytse'a New Brick Block.)
Independence. low*.
JED f-4
KG,
I 0 N E
AT
iiW,
NOTARY PL'BUC AND
k WU AOHIW
ImlejxndcHf^, loira.
.1. «J. iioi'si:,
M.
n.
KERIDEICE AMD OFFICE,
Cau»
op
MOT* AID CaATaAM Srum,
INDKPEXbESCK, iOW$
JOHN T. HANCOCK.
WHOLESALE TIROCER,
It,
AIN BTJ1EKT,
SutouQuo. low«.
BART,
L. W.
ATTORNEY
NOTARY
AT LAW
PUBLIC,
AMI
Okfn
k in
Wim'ox** Brick Block,
ISDSPKSnESCE, WW A.
AllMtlli, l'1«. [T-ly
MRS. II. H. TI'RXER,
Artist ia Hair Jewdry!
Ear Rinpp, nrem!"t Finsrer Hinjr*.rhain*,
Hearts, ('mim*?, lU^kcti, Necklacea of every de
•i^n. M'ijff. Switeh«*p, 'urN and Hraidn, ivtado t»
order. Lndios' Umir i urled or Friscd. Hair
wanted, for which reasonable price* will
Im
TAILORING
Of every I)cFor»jti« n 1 ne
a
-upcrior manlier.
Ia4epeadeace* Nov. 13» ISfift, [41 tf
O. K. GRIFFITH, U. D.,
EfLECTH I'HVSIfUN i HIRtiEOX,
with s ,Iam«ftin, Main Street,
INDEPENDENCE IOWA.
Dee. U6«. *7 ly
t. p. iA»rso*. e. v. sTKVBveoK
J. 1\ SAMPSON & CO.,
FURNITURE DEALERS,
Main Street, 4th Door East of lirid^c.
IXDWEXUHXCE, IOWA.
COY & HAMMOND,
DKAI.KtlS III
drtceries aai Prtvisitat,
MndepettfUnee, Mm*mi.
^MIKIIIEST CASH PRICK paid for all
kinds of cuan try produce.
A W'J' A hmy in Atlndmn—
0wdi
KRAFT & KONZ
W Uuletale and retail dealer* ia
CIOARS,
FINE COT, TLUO, AND SIIOKI10
TOBACCO. PIPES,
0ENTT1NK MEERSCHAUM PIPES,
RUBUKK. AND CLAY PIPES,
MMiAU WOOD PIPES.
fOUACCO BOXES,
SNUFF. MATCH SAFES,
ETC., ETC., ETC.,
Main Street 4 Doors East of Walnut Street,
INDEPENDENCE. IOWA.
B7Being agents for direct Manufacturer*,
without intermediate proflt*. *e will sell a*
ow a* any boua* we*t of Cliieago.
Acovitvi
i. o. «. T.
I'nity
PinilSHEn EVERY TUESDAY.
•ran: M,(IO per A«hb, In Advance.
Omur In Oxlnn'
Lod^e,
NO. 1«, |. (), |. T.. meets on
Friday evening vf each week, at 74 o'clock, in
Good Templars' llall, *raer of Main and
Stroets, Independence, Iowa. Transient
Templars in good standing cordially invited to
attend.
B. P. BAKKR, W. 0. T.
i.
6m Square, nne innertion, .......,$1 Aft
feah (uhaoqnent insertion..,. to
Okie squaro, thn* month*, 60
Itao 9i|uar«, nil months, 6 60
On* iquin, una year
lii fourth onluian, one JMT, ...!$ tO
(fee-hair column, one ji*krtlT« ...**.....,45 00
One column, "no }«*r, 95 00
Duainc* c*rd«. one 00
N. YOUNG, W. 8.
I. O. O. F.
Regular oommunicittion of IndependfBee
Lodge, No. 142, in 0M Fellow*' Hall, corner uf
Main and Rtreeti, on Monday evening
of each week at o'clock. Transient brethren
ia good standing are cordially tn\ ite«l to Attend.
E. A Al.KXANDKR, N. J.
T. J. MA
Th* leg*! p«|u*re «»f printed mnHer ib
KIN 18, Fee'y.
a. A. R.
Regular meetings of Post
31.
at the hall OT.r
Rich's Crockery Store, Main Street, Indepen
dence, on Thursday evening, at 7 o'clock.
Traveling comrades in good standing cordially
invited tu attend.
J. A. DAVIS,
P. A.
Rockford Nurseries,
J. 8. 8IIGARMAN, Prop r.
This is one «f the Tsar^eet and most Kxtenstre
Nurseries in the North«re«t, eoni|jrisingeYer
500,000 Standard and Dwarf Ap
ple Trees,
100,000 Choice 6rape Beets,
And a complete assortment of Nursery £tock,
among which are Shrub*, Grapes, Ra*|«herrie?,
I'M nek berries, »^trawherrics, Goosehcrries, Cur
rants, ltulha, Ac. Alio,
ad
Vug,
Cappal'* Niw
BLOCK,
mcnt of
ever
T. M. lU'NT,
Extensive Assort
FLQWERISQ ROOTS, rLASTS, At.
Mr. Fhearman. the Proprietor of the jattly
CeU'Krntrd R«ckford Nurseries, is well-known
throughout entire West.
Farn»r-. Fruit Growers And Ameteurs, of Bu
chanan County, send us your order*, and
H*« tfiU *iuarantff Sfttia/nrtitm in erery
The facilities for shipping are Unsarpasaed.
pit All Trees Packed in Moss and shipped
without delay.
Send fur Cattdogne md Prict List
Laaiaacrti At Bctta,
Canvassing Af'ts.
FARM FOR ALE.
TIIK
sul^cri^cr harinp removed to Daeotah
Territory, offers for sale his fhrm. situated
throe fourth* of a mile southeast of Littleton,
Ruchaiuin Co.. Tuwa. containing two hundred
acreo of lan], one hundred under improvement.
Said fens i« veil watered by a good fpainsr. a)»o
a good well. There is plenty of timber for Are
wood, also twenty Acre* of oak timber two miles
distant. I offer io »ell the farm and timber for
three thousand dollars, one-half cash, the re
mainder in annual paymen's to suit the purchas
er. For further particulars, inquire of E. B.
Cook, of Jeeup, or E. Little, near the premises.
T. K. I10VEY,
M-Sm] Vermillion, Dacotah Ter'y,
A BARN
14x20.
Enquire of
M-tfl WM. PCOTT.
Dr. J. KELLOaa
^uO0uf«
DENTAL SDB6E0N!
Wishes to sny to the inliabitanta of
Indcpendi n.'e. and surrounding country,
that he has come here to live, rind expects
to make lnde|«enlence his peruianeot home,
and having had over 20 yearn practice in sur
gical and practical dentistry, he feels con6.
dencc »u a.^uring the public that hi* operations
will be as well performed as can be done Kaet
or West. His charges wilt be rea»onnble, and
all wrk warranted. Office over millinery rooms
one door caM of Marquette A McKensie's Fur
niture Store, Main Street.
|«aid.
Roosf on Main Street, upi '^.tc Rowley's Store.
Nev. 11th. 186*. [21-tf]
JOHN J. DALY,
ATTORNEY AT LA*
Urturjf rwaiic,
AND
GENERAL LAND AGENT,
JESn', IOWA.
I\II
MUtm#\s rwimv
a» uiinn.
If u want any La.d in Ruckanan or
Rla'khawk Counties, write to, or Call nn Joan
J. Dtl.v, Jesap, Iowa. [30-lj
Dr.lLO. Baldwin,
JESVP, WWA,
DKALRR IN
Kurt.
FbidkiickC.
J. KIM*.
Notice*
To All Persons who are Destrotu
of Setting Fruit Trees,
Applet*, Pears, Pium*, I'hi'rrn i-, either Standard
or lwart. t'urrauts of all varieties. Grapes, Ev
ergreen?, riowerinif Shrubs, and in fnet every
thing in the line of the Nursery business, nay
le purchased by oalliue at the Niir.-ery. one
mile west of tbo city, »'on, and leuv inn orders
for tho same. As I aiu appointed an aj ent for
the »a|e of anj thinic in that lino by Mr Sliear
aim, of the Rin kfonl Nurseries, therefore every
body will liad it to tUeir *dvaatag« to call on the
subscriber before rurcbasin? elu whore.
3:(tfl
JOHN P. BOrCK.
DRUGGISTS SUNDRIES,
PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES.
to Deft'nr
Fret«/ Charyi.
Indeptndence, Jan* 5, 18M.
DYE-STUFFS,
PIKE WINKS AND LIQlOiS
For M*dieinal Purposes.
Fin* Ftrflntrr for tk* Haa4k«rahl«£
MANTUA HAKINO!
MBS. M. A. SHAW,
OVER
W*
S. WafgMer In C«'s
BOOK STORE,
Would announce that she is prepared to
do all
kinds of
DHBBS MAKTUA MAXXKOZ
AND
MACHINE STITCIIKO,
In the Very Latest Stylet!
And In a maanrr warrantad to please euaton
era.
T.1T- Shaw has reeently remstml from
Union
HIMrs.,
mI
to her preimt wore aceessabh,
rooms, thro* door* west of the Muntour llonss.
Sli 3iu
LEE A HEART,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
AND
REAL ESI ATE AGENTS.
orrici IN CAPPAU.*« i&OCE.
INDEPENDENCE\ IOWA.
Feb. 5,1867. [S» tf
DRDTH. GILL
Dental 8urgeon,
INDEPENDENCE, IOWA.
(Soeeestor to Dr. Nkkoleea.)
OAM la LsytM'a lfew Block, Up Mn.
KEFERENCES:
NCNUV •••HAtt, M. tlOwaMTY.
Baring re-fitted the rooms formerly ooetipfed
by Dr. Nicholson, he wishes to say to the inhab
itants of Independence and surrounding coun
try, that having had several yearn' practice in
surgical and practical Dentistry, be feel* confi
dent in assuring them that be can perform all
operations as well as can be done eUewhere, and
charges reasonable also, agrees to perform all
operations heretefore agreed tobr Dr. Nichol
•m, at the same rates.
All Operation* Warranted.
Dee. 18, I860. [It]
A RARE CHANCE
To get a fir«t-ct»sa dwelling in Independence*
Iowa. The subscriber being desiroas of remov
ing west, now offers his residence on corner of
Walnut and Mott streets, for sale. The lot is
10 rods square, with good barn, a good never
failing well, and a large cittern i» on the place.
The houpo in one of the best in the eity, 32x24
feet on the ground, two stories high, has a
cellar, has tix rooms on fir.-t floor and five
the second, all well finished. Any gentleman
wishing a nice residence would do well to exam
ine this property before buying. Terms easy
For further particular, enquire of the subscriber
on the plaee, er Ransom Bartle, Land Agent, In
dependence, Iowa oUce twodoois east of Mon
tour House. J.
f.
PURE WINES A LIQUORS
For Medical Parpo*** o||f.
DTE STUFFS,
PERFUMERY,
BRUSHES dc.,
••Id Cheap for C^ih.
PteteriptUmM Carefully Prtpani.
H. C. MAEEHAM.
Jan.
1,
IS#*.
[28-3D
BLANKS! BLANKS
We invite the attention of every Officer in the
County SCHOOL DIRECTORS. TEACH
ERS, JUSTICES, CONSTABLES A LAW
YEKS, Ac., that
AT OUR BOOK STORE
THET WILL FIND
Every Blawk They TVeed!
CALL AND EXAMINE MT STOCK.
J. P. SAMPSON GO.
Not.
20,1X66. [22 tf
HOUSE, LOT & BA&N FOB SALE
THELittleton,
subscriber offers for sale, in the Villa*,
of a large two story stone dwell
ing, containing four upper rooms, two large oaea
below, a large west wing, and a commodious cel
lar. The lower storv was formerly constructed
for a store room, but is now divided by a tempo
rary partition. Also a large barn on the same
lot. Any person desiring a place for a More
will find Littleton aa excellent point, and tkis
house large and convenient enough for a store,
dwelling or entertainment. The whole will be
sold for $HM. Who wants a bargain? Uo and
*ee for yomrselvMt Md k* quick or it may be
gone. S. M. KIER,
Wlatkrop, Iowa.
Feb. IS, 1M7. [34-tf
A CHOICE LOT OF
Valuable Farm Lands
AT REASONABLE PRICES,
AND
Term to Smt Pvrckaun, to-mt:
P't Section. See. Tr.
Sw 7 90 8
Bt... w
Sw IS
Seventy ow MM to W 8# 9
Se*e
S
S *w
Fine Hair Oils aad Pomades.
May** A«kroil far 6rey Hair.
Laurd's Rlooa of Youth, aad
ALL PATENT MEDICINES.
STOCK ALWAYS COMPLETE AND
GOODS PCTBS.
Nov. A, ISM. [eMf
89 9
S
Sw *e
89 9
I,
89 9
Nhnwf, W 89 9
Nw ne 11 89 9
Twentf Timkris 19 89 9
Three and acrea in 35 89 9
Thirteen hundred acre* 1^ mQei frooo
Winthrop Station.
Three hundred and twenty aeree one mile,
and two hundred and fo^y acres adjoining Ma
sonville Station.
Northwest of the Southeast of tection 39,
in township S9, range T.
The above lands comprise only a small por
tion ef the valuable land
bow
being offered for
sale by the undersigned, and among which
will be found many choice farm locations, well
adapted to either grain or grating purpoae*,
well watered, and eonvenieat to market. Al
so, a few Choice Village Lot* in Independence
and Winthrop.
34-tf LEE A WEART.
DAVIS & SON,
Dealer, in All Kinds of
PINE LUMBER,
LATH, SHINGLES, D00R8, SUB,
EAST OF IlKPOT,
INDEPENDENCE JOWA.
WALL PAPER
i at
Waggoner & Co's.
ND
LYON.
Dec. 11, 1**6. (2Stf
BUY TOU*
SCHOOL BOOKS
or
Waggoner ft Co-,
Where nay b. found the Beat Itsek of Be.k
aadStationeryneoaaty.
Winthrop in the Field.
NEW BRIC STORE.
The subscriber would respectfully inform the
people of Eastern Buchanan County, that he ha*
fitted up the store recently oeewpied by Mr.
Beeeher, and offers a stock of pure
Drugs & Medicines,
Personally Mlected, aad kaewa to be pan
and fresh. Also,
Or
THE CMtSlNCi RiCKE.
cr r. avciABa* a*an.
[The fullewing is pronounced by tM Wft
minstrr Htiew
to be unquestionably th^finest
American poem ever written]
Within the realms ef leafless trees,
The russet year inhaled the dreamy air,
Like some tanned reaper in his honr
When all the fields are lying brown and fcre.
The gray barns looking from their hasy Ills,
O'er
the dun waters in the vales,
Kent down the air a greeting to the mps
On the dull thunder of alternate flaiK
All sights are mellowed, and all sounds subdued,
The hills seemed further and the^f ream sang low,
As in a dream the distant wt*»dman hewed
His wintry log with many* luuJBed blow.
The embattled forest, srewhile armed with gold
Their banners bright with every martial blue,
Now stood like some «ad, beaten hosts of old,
Withdraw
u
aiar ia Time s remotest bine.
On sombre wings the vulture tried his flight
The dove searce heard his sighing mate's com
plaint
And, like a star slow drowning in the light,
The village church vane seemed to pale and (ant.
The M-ntinel cock upon the hill-side crew
Crew thrice—and ail was stiller than before
Silent 'till some replying warder blew
His alien horn and then wu heard no mn.
Where erft the jay, within the elm's tallereit
Made garulous trouble around her unfledged
young
And where the oriole hungBer swaying testy
By every light wind like a censor swung.
Where sung the n*/isy martins of the eavM*
The busy swallows circling ever near—*
Foreboding, as the rustic mind believe^
An early harvest aad a plenteous year*
Where every bird that waked the verntl
Shook the sweet slumber from its wingf
To warn the reaper of the rosy east
All was now sunless, empty and forlorn.
Alone,from out the stubble, Piped the quril
And eroaked the crow thro' all the dreamy gloom,
Alone, the peasant, drumming in his vale,
Made echo in the distant cottage loom,
There was no bud, no bloom npon the bowers.
The spiders waved treir thin shrouds night by
night
The thistle down, the only ghost of flowerf,
Sailed slowly by—passed noiseless oat of sight.
Aad atl this—in this most dreary air,
And where the woodbine shed upon the porel
Its criui-cn leaves, as if the year stood ffcflS*,
Firing the air with its inverted touch*
Amid all this, the center ef the scene,
The white-haired matron with monotontmf ttmd
Plied the *wift wheel, and with her joyoua mem,
Sat like a fhte and watched the flying tread.
She had knowa sorrow. He had walked with her,
Oft supped, and broke with her ashed crvat,
And in the dead leaves still she heard the Itlr
Of his thick mantle trailing ia the dust.
While yet his cheek was bright with summer
Her country summonad and she gave her all
And twice was bowed to her in sable plea**—
Re-gave the sword to rwst upon the watt.
R*-gave the sword, but not the hand that draw
And struck for liberty the dying blow
Nor him, who to his sire and country tra*,
Fell 'uiid the ranks of the invading foe.
Long, but not l.ud th. drooping wh**l Mat oa,
Like the low ataruirr of a hive at Boon,
Long, but not l.ud the memory of the goo*
Breathed through lips a sad aad tremulous tone.
At last the thread was snapped—her head was
bowed
Life dropped the distaff thro' her hands serene
And Iwviug neighbors enjoothed careful shroud,
While death and winter closed the autumn scene.
H*w XNk Ita Feet.
We believe there is
do
where men and women walk as much as
here. The size ol the city, its peculiar form,
tic overcrowding uf cars an stages, the very
habit* of the people tend tu make popular
the exercise of walking. The necessary (ly
ing about during business hours, each day,
cover, more miles than all the walking done
in a dozen counties in the interior. A New
York merchant, broker, banker, lawyer, edi
tor, takes, as bis ordinary walk, a promen
ade, which makes hi* country cousiua dead
lame. And a New York b/lle will walk
more miles in a day, and blush to find it
fame, than any non-professional from the ru
ral districts. La4ies in the country ride, ai
the more the country i* in excess, the
less thev walk. In the rural districts proper
they walk not at all, except to an occasional
summer picnic, a half mile away. In the
villages, to go a single mile would be to
double the length of all the streets. In some
cities a mile takes one to the suburbs. Here
ladies thiuk nothing of doing tbe distance
from Murray Hill to Canal street, a good two
and a half mile*, and repeat, to say nothing
of crossing and re-crossing four or five ave
nue*. Look at Broadway on any day, and
at Fifth avenue on Sunday, with their cease
leu tide of promeuaders. If tbe commer
cial and professional men of New York go
home by car* aud stages, who are they that
crowd Broadway from to t» o'clock in the
"afternoon Any one familiar with the faces
of our citizens can pick out the solid men by
thousands, while the stage* go by filled with
tbe stranger* at hotels, people in a special
hurry, tbe lame and the lazy, and those who
hare already walked till they are tired, and
altogether a mere fraction of the ptoaiena
dcrs.
It is the common remark of visitor* in
New York, from any other part of the coun
try, that their triet:Js here "walk them to
death." They take naturally to a car or a
stage to go from Wall street to the St. Nich
olas, or from Niblo's to Union Square.
Few New Yorker* would think of such a
waste of stamps, or of riding a single mile
when it was possible to walk it. Central
Park u burdened with promeuaders. It is
no short walk to go from the entrance to the
Terrace, or the end of the Bamble and re
turn, yet this i. a common exercise of park
visitor*, and many of them have walked to
the park from their homes. The absence of
car and stage routes across town" is
an ab
solute bar to riding in that direction. Yet
the cross streets have their walking popula
tion at all hours. It is impossible to live in
Mew York and not walk. Few there are,
who leave their houses at all, who do not
walk at least two miles a day, and those who
do sedentary work" are the first to glove
themselves for the loug stretch up town. If
they live in Brooklyn they must walk to the
ferry, and thev have a further walk on the
Other side, whea the theatres close, the
streets are again crowded and onlv a small
portion find stage or car room. The large
majority take to their trotters.''—Commer­
cial Aarrrther.
Plaix
XT I
a
*«L
Trad* I* Llttlt Dall."
We find the following «t»icy little sketch in
the Boxton
Commercial JlutUtin.
it
SrKtx'H.—On a trial for an assault,
at the assizes, some years ago, a medical
witness, in giving his evidence informed the
court that on examining the prosecutor, he
found him Buffering from a severe contution
of the integuments under the left orbit, with
great extravasation of blood, and erchymo
sis in the suiroundinr cellular tissue, which
was in a tumefied state. There WM also
considerable abrasion of the cuticle.
Judge.—" You mean, I suppose,
Judge.—" Then why not say so at oaea 7"
Id youth we lore and enjoy the
moat ill-choacn friend* perh&|* more
than in old age the best oboseo.
Tt forci­
bly illustrate* tli«? (net that trade if a little
dull," and also that that portion of the buai
nes* community known a* drumuur*,' or
commercial travelers, despite their almost
inexhaustible resource# and inversion, are
often obliged to )ield to the pressure of these
Stagnant times. The
VulUlin
say?
rf,l' ^'jr
hi«tle. Bros.A Co.,
of this citv,
1''1
"how a very la%'« exhib­
it of order
10
balance the liberal exm-n^e
accoun*allowed him by the firm, anl Mr.
Thi""H looking over his return, said
Mr. Rataplan, I am afraid you did not
approach the dealers in the right »aj I
used to be very successful in this line. Now,
just suppose me to
Ik:
Mr. Uigher, of Sellout,
HI., and show
me
tbe way you introduce the
house."
Accordingly, Mr. Rataplan stepped out of
the counting room and re entered, hat in
hand, inquiring, Is Mr. Higher in 7"
That s my name," said Thistle, urbane
b-
My name is Rataiilan, sir: I represent
tbe house of Thistle, Brothers A Co., of Bos
ton."' Thistle, in his character of Western
merchant, here rose, offered the salesman a
chair, and expressed his pleasure with see
ing him.
I am stopping with Overcharge at the
Stiekem House, and have a fine unbroken
lot of samples, which I would like to show
you think we can offer you some special ad
vantages, etc." And Rataplan delivered
himself of a neat speech in professional
style.
Very well, very well," said Thistle I
don't see but that you understand the way to
at customers.
Kxcuse me, Mr. Thistle," said Rataplan
I am afraid you don't understand the style
of Western merchants just now suppose you
exchange places with me ani repeat this re
hearsal."
Certainly," said Thistle, and picking up
his hat he stepped out. Returning, he found
Rataplan with the chair tilted back, hat
cocked fiercely over the right eye, bis heels
planted on Thistle's polished desk, and a
lighted cigar between his teeth.
Thistle looked a little staggered, but nev*
crtbeless he commenced—
"Is Mr. Bigher in?"
"Yes, be is, responded Rataplan,blowing
a cloud of pure Connecticut into Thistle's
eyes, Who in are you
I represent tbe house of Thistle, Bros. A
Co.," said the astonished employer, cough
ing out about a quart of smoke from Lis
throat
The biases yon do an you one of that
concern 7"
No, sir, I an not," said Thistle.
Well, it's d—d lucky for you that you
are not, for I're had two drummers to one
customer in my store for the last two mouths,
and if I could get hold of one of the blasted
fools that send 'em out here at this time I'm
durned if I wouldn't boot him clean out of
the town of Sellout."
That'll do, that'll do, Mr. Rataplan,"
said Thistle 1 have no doubt you did tbe
best you could for the interests of the house.
Trade
a little dall."
city in the world
A VwUcata ittask!
Court was in session, and amid the multi
plicity of business which crowded upon the
iheriff, he stopped at the door of a beautiful
vidow on the sunny side of tbirtv, who by
tie way, had often bestowed melting glances
an the aforesaid sheriff. He was admitted
and the widow appeared. The confusion
and fright which the arrival of her visitor oc
ctsioned, set off to great advantage the cap
tivating charms of the widow Her
eleeks bore the beautiful blended tints of the
apple blossom her lips resembled the rose
luds, upon which the morning dew yet lin
gered, and her eyes were like quivers of cu
pd and the glances of love aud tenderness,
wth which they were filled, resembled ar
rtws which only invited a beau" (pardon
tie pun to do lull execution. After a few
cammon place remarks, Madam,r said the
natter-of-fact sheriff, I have an attachment
far you."
A
deeper blush than usual mantled the
cteeks of the fair widow while tbe glance
ot her downcast eyes were centered upon
ber beautiful foot, which half concealed bv
flawing drapery, patted the floor. She with
equal candor, r. plied
Sir, the attachment is reciprocal."
For some time the sheriff maintained an
astonished silence, and at length said
Madam, will you proceed to court?"
Proceed to court," replied the lady, with
a merry laugh, then shaking her heaJ, sbe
said no, sir, though this is leap year, I
will not take advantage of the license there
in granted to my sex, and therefore I greatly
prefer that you should proceed to court."
But, madam, the justice is waiting."
Let him wait: I am not disposed to hur
ry matters in so unbecoming a manner be
side, sir, when the ceremony is performed, I
wish you to understand that I greatly prefer
a minister to a justice of tbe peace."
A
light dawned upon the sheriff", brains.
u
Madam," said be, rising from his chair
with solemn dignity, "there is a great mis
take here my language has beer, misunder
stood tbe attachment of which I speak was
issued from the office of Squire and
commands me to bring you instantly before
him to answer contempt of court in disobey
ing a subpoena in tbe case of Smith versus
Janes."
Waaala wllfe c.atrl»al*t* •, i**h
Itlllafs.
No notis will be took—from this date af
terwards—ov letters that haint got a postage
stamp onto them.
Don't write onlv on one side of the manu
script, and dou't write much onto that.
Don't send a manuscrip unless you can
read it yourself after it get- drv.
We pay, all the way up hill, from ten cents
to oue dollar for contributions according to
tbe heft.
And settlements made promptly at the end
of next ensuing year.
Poetry and proae pieces are respectfully
solicited.
The highest market price padc for awful
•raleroad smashes, aud elopements with oth
er man's wife.
No swearing aloud in our paper.
Isaac—Your article on frogs is received.
It made tue laff like lightning.
Your idea that frogs might be incnased
by propogashun," is bully.
our idea that frogs was discovered by
Kristopher Columbus, in the year 1492," has
slipped ray memory.
u also say that frogs grow more bob
tailed as they grow older. This is too good
to be entirely lost.
Noah—we very humbly dekline your essa
oa the flood.
Your remarks might possibly lead one
more man to think as you do, and we don't
want our columns to be held responsible for
increasing the number of phools.
that the
man had a black eve 7"
Witness.—" Yes."
The world has already got more phools
than there is any need
at.
There aiu't uo doubt in mi mind but that
the flood was a perfect success, and I have
thought that another just such a one would
pay well in some section* of the country.
COUNTY BULLETIN
N.
INDEPENDENCE, IOVA, TUESDAY MARCH 19, 1867. BULLETIN, VOL. 2, NO. 39,
Kuperlnteudent of Public Instruction.
Gov. Stone has appointed Trof. D.
Franklin Wells, ol Iowa City, to the office of
Superintendent of Public Instruction, r«c
Mr. Faviile, reni/ncd. Prof. We 1U has been
loug identified with the educational interests
of Iowa, aiid was for several years Professor
of the Theory and I'racticc of Teaching in
the State I'nivr-rsity."
We find the above in the Davenport
zette
One of these gentV-nien, who has recently
returned from
Journal,
labored effort in reply from Senator Ross,
the leading spirit in the removal. The State
Teachers' Association, at its next meeting
condemned it aud appointed Prof. Wells its
agent for tl e State, and now Gov. Stone en
dorses the Professor in the most practical
manner passible by placing him at the head
of the whole common school system of the
State. Although the State University loses
his invaluable services the cause cf educa
tion in the State secures a successor to Gov.
Faville able to
Jilt
his place in the most effi­
cient manner. Prof. Wells is an enthusiast
in his profession. He »ill labor solely for
the best interests of the cause. We trust he
now enters upon duties which he will long
be called upon to discharge.—/ova
p'Mican.
Anticipated
Little Coiktesies.—How much
of meaning, of refinement, aye, of
Christianity itself, there is in those in
cidental attentions, and politeness,
which go a great way in making up
the beauty of life!
We have known a great many peo
ple—good, warm hearted, and gener
ous—who were capable of almost any
act of self-sacrifice and abnegation,
who would never have condescended
to raise their hat to a lady, or offer a
glass before drinking themselves.
This is frequently the fault of a
coarse-grained nature, but, perhaps,
most often the result of early educa
tion. Indeed, we always think the
man's manners are the living eptstie,
known of all men," of his moth
er's training. Habitual politeness can
only make a through gentleman—a
woman, a true lady. And this is
most easily acquired in one's own
household. If a boy be respectful
and courteous to his sisters, he will
be so to all women, so long as he
lives but if his intercourse with
them be course, careless, abrupt, not
soft and refined with a thousand name
less attentions and graces, he will be
rough, awkward—not fulfilling always
the beautiful injunction of the apost
le, Be ye courteous to all men."
Then, too. outward character for it
is a law of our being that express
ion intensifies the emotions ana feel
ings."
But this work, after all, lies with
every mother in the had—in the
world and we can only hope that
these hints may influence some one to
consider it.
THE
WINNESHIEK.—The
A WOMAN OF OOOD TASTE.
You sot) tiiis lady turning a cold
eye to the assumnces of shopmen and
the recommendation of milliners.
She cares not how original the pattern
may be, if it be ugly, or how recent a
shape, if it be awkward. Whatever
lawn fashion dictates, she follows a
law of her own, and is never behind
it She wears very beautiful things
which people generally suppose to be
fetched from Paris, or, at least, made
by a French milliner, but which as
often are bought at the nearest town
and made up by her own maid. Not
that her costume is either rich or
new on the contrary, she wears
many a cheap dress, but it is always
pretty, and many an old one, but it fo
always good. She deals in no gaudy
confusion of colors, nor does she ef
fect a studied sobriety but she eith
er refreshes you with a spirited con
trast, or composes you with a judicious
harmony. Sot a scrap of tinsel or
trumpery appears upon her. She
puts no faith in velvet, or gilt buttons,
or taisted cording. She is quite
aware, however, that the garnish ia as
important as the dress all her inner
borders and headings are delicate and
fresh and should anything peep out
wbich is not intended to be seen, it is
quite as much so as that which is.
After all, there is no great art cither
in her fashions or her materials. The
secret consists simply in her knowing
the three grand unities of dress—her
own station, her own age, and her
own points. And no woman can
dress well without it After this we
need dot say that whoever is attract
ed by the costume will not be disap
pointed in the wearer. She may not
be handsome nor accomplished, but we
will answer for her being even temper
ed, well informed, thoroughly sensible
and a complete lady.—London Quar
terly Review.
da-
of Monday and have no doubt it is cor
rect. Gov. Stone has done himself credit in
this appointment. He has not looked ep a poli
tician for reward for party servii-e, but has
appointed a man solely for his qualifications
for the position, an
Iwutnr,
»hoae whole
life has been devoted to the work and who is
as thoroughly familiar with the subject of
education as any man in the country. Tbe
board of trustees of the I'nivi r.-iity knew not
what they were doing when they removed
Prof. Weils from the Normal Department of
tb* l.'uiversity. That action has been con
demned by the educational men of the .State.
Gov. Faville, Sufx.-rii.tendent of Public In
struction, condemned it very severely in the
School
so severely as to call out a
City Jit-
nion of
Spatx
axd
Portugal.—OnUtbe
8tb of Decem­
ber, the Queen of Spain accompanied
by the King Consort and her son and
daughter, set out from Madrid on a
visit to the Kingrwd Queen of Portu
gal. The visit of the royal family of
8pain to their royal neighbors at Lia
bon, says a foreign journal, is an un
prueedent event, and one which.in the
present state of affairs in the Penin
sular, is calculated to arrest attention.
Tiie Spanish Court is aware that the
revolution which appears to be pend
ing in .Spain will, probably, if sucess
ful, assume a dynastic form, a desire
being widely spread among the Span
ish Liberals, for "a nulification" of
the Peninsular under the House of
Hraganza. The House of Bourbon is
to be deposed from the throne of
Spain, and the King of Portugal is to
become King of the Peninsula. Such
views unquestionably find favor
among the influential portion of the
Spanish people, and it is doubtless in
connection with this circumstance
that the King and Queen of Portugal
are honored with a visit fram their
royal neighbors. There is also a ru
mor that the royal visit is meant to
pave the way for a matrimonial alli
ance, as a good means of obviating
any violent or immediate change in
the royal politics of the Peuinstua.
TJW New Paper Mitt.
Among the various manafbettning
enterprises which have sprung into
existence in Northern Iowa during
the past three years, none have been
established on a better basis, nor en
tered the field with more brilliant
prospects, than the Iowa Manufactur
ing Company, which was organized
in this city about a year affo, and has
since erected a Paper Mill, which is
now ready for ita machinery on the
north fork of the Maqnoketa, near
Worthington. The mill is a frame
structure, having heavy 6tone founda
tion walls which enclose a deep base
ment, and consists of a two-story
main building flanked by two one
story wing*, the whole being 160 feet
long by 40 feet deep. The mill was
erected under the supervision of Mr.
Harger, and of course is well built
It presents a really imposing appear
ance, its general out*ide work partak
ing far more of solidity and ornate
ness than is possessed by any other
mill in the West.
The water-power is furnished by a
race-way eight feet wide and ten feet
deep, and two hundred feet long.
Its sides are of stone, and it is arch
ed with the same material. This race
cost ,000, exclusive of excavation.
The company intend to devoU the
mill, for the present, to the manufac
ture of priut paper. Yesterday a
ponderous paper machine, of the la
test and most improved kind, with all
its accompanying machinery, was tak
en to the mill. It was purchased at
a cost of 19,500, at Beloit, Wis.
The Company has also purchased
for their niArhino. Jones Vnrrjua
harson's patent for bleaching paper
pulp by hydrosta*ic pressure. It is
a new and most successful process,
which expedites the conversion of fi
brous material of all kinds Used in
paper-makiug into pulp in a far more
expeditious manner than was thought
possible until it appeared. This
right cost the company nearly $6,000.
Mr. WM. Marshall, of this city, is
building the boiler shaped apparatus
used io the bleaching process. It
will cost $1,500.
Rouse k Dean have nearly finish
ed th# castings for the mill, and are
doing their work in a very satisfac
tory manner, of course.
"the company intend to commence
the manufacture of paper in a few
weeks. Already letters have been
received by the Secretary from par
ties who use print papers extensively,
and wish to make arrangements for
a supply. The mill's capacity will
enable tlie company to furnish Dubu
que and several other cities with all
the print paper that they will want.
The company has a paid up capital
of $50,000, and the constantly
increasing demand for paper must
make the paper-mill Investment a
verv profitable oue.
*fhe following are the naatetof tho
officers:
Winne­
shiek Insurance company, of Free
port, has been raising quite a com
motion in the ranks of its policy hold
ers. The officer* of the Winneshiek
are either a little deficient in good
common tense, or they opine that
their policy holders are very deficient
of those qualities.
A
short time since
the Secretary of the Company sent an
assessment to each of the policy hold
ers, some of which were foi the wlioic
amount of the premium note.
A
paid this assessment, and a great
many did not. To those who did not
respond to the first call, a second and
corrected assessment, was s^nt,
which was paid by a small percen
tage of those who' had not paid the
former assessment
A
third and
fourth assessments were subsequently
sent, and were paid by a few. One
of the members of the company esti
mates that it hat rc&clveti over vlOO,
000 from the assessments made with
in the past few weeks. The whole af
fair looks like a hug swindle, That
the concern is of the "wild cat"
species don't admit of a doubt.—Hen
ry Co. (IU.) Cronicle.
Great men direct the events of
their time, wise men take advantage
of them weak men are carried along
ill their currrcnt.
We pause sometimes in a path to
scan our own foot-prints when it is to
1
late to remodel or retrace them.
I'reaiJent—W. W. Luke.
8 perinterulent—M. Harger.
Secretary—James M. McKinlay.
Trtimirtr—W. H. Clark.
The company own a flouring mill,
situated not far from the paper-mill.
Their entire property is very valua
ble. It could be sold to-day for a
much larger sum than was paid for it
few
Energetic, active business men,
who have iufluense at home and
abroad, own most of the stock, and
before many mouths the Iowa Mann
factoring Company will be rren«pi»
»Mwa^ ctfrponuon, aad its
manufactures sought after.—Dub.
Time*.
"Lame!" sighed Mrs. Partington,
here I have been suffering the big
mies of death three mortal weeks.
Fust I was seized with a bleeding
phrenology in the left hemisphere of
the brain, which was exceeded by a
stoppage of the left veutilator of the
heart This gave an iuflamation in
the borax, anil now I'm sick with the
chloroform morbus. There is no
blessiu' like that of health, particularly
when vou'er sick."
ADVICE TO THK LADIFJB.
Hall's Jf/urnal of Health contains
the following very sensible advire
Ladies, walk more take 1 ng
walks get tired, no matter how tired
muscles in any well woman, from
eighteen to forty-eight, "nlv proven
they need to be used flabby muscle#
also prove that the system lacks tone.
They are liLc a violin with the keys
loose—the strings are without vibra
tion and the instrument is dea^.
Wear the best of ealf half boots,
ladies exreise with them till you M"?
well enough and brave ?aongn to go
out, will clad, in all weather. Wear
no rubbers, if you can avoid it. They
are bad for the feet. If you need to'
paddle in slush and soft snow of
spring, put on rubbers, for the feet
muft be kept warm ami dry, but use
hem as little as possible. Wear,
when out of doors, solid shoes. Take*
all the open air exercise you can by'
walking, and you will be in your old
age, as fine looking as you are now:
and, moreover, the next generation'
will be as proud of you as the yotm«!
fry of Old England are of their state
lv mothers. We have seen in Hyde
Park, London, on a fair day. hund
reds of grandmothers fresh and really
handsome and scores of mother*
with marriageable daughters, which,
had we been in the marrying line our
selves, we should hardly have known
which to |have popped the question
to, so dazzling was the real besrtty
and worth of both. Our American?
ladies can possess these charms, and
carry them into the age ot three
score, if they will walk more into tha
open air, and inhale daily the hearth
giving properties which can be obtain
ed in wearing out a couple of pairs of
tip top ten dollar gaiters per year.
We hold that one ten dollar pair of
walking shoes will save twenty doc
tor's visits at five dollars eaeh. Take
your choice, ladies.
The lageaalty af tfee Ja|sas—•
They are bold, courageous, proud
and eager after ever kind of knowl
edge. A gentlman gave a workrui
a Bramah lock to pnt on a bo* it
was not discovered until some time
afterward, aod only then by the ab
sence of the name, that the lock had
been imitated, and, as the workman
confessed, the original kept as a pat
tern. There is a steamer (paddle,)
which used three years ago to ran
between Nagasaki and Jeddo. 600
miles, whose engines and boilers, and
every part of her machinery, were
made of copper. She was built by a
doctor in Jeddo,whose only guide was
a Dutch description of a stejfm en
gine, translated into Japanese. An
American gunnery officer was sent
over in 1859, in the Powhattan, to
teach them gunner}-. He was court
eously received, and then taken over
to the arsenal at Jeddo. He returned
to the ship, saying he had been
taught a lesson instead of having to
teach."
In many of the arts and manufac
tures they excel oa their beautiful
castings in bronce would puzzle the
most experienced European workmen.
Specimens have bet-n shown to clever
workmen who have confessed they
could not imitate them though they
do not kuow how to blow glass, there
are samples which would rival in bril
liancy anv made in England. The
French Minister had a large ball, so
clear, and of such perfect color* that
he believed it to be a gigantic sap
phire, and bought it for a good round
CI1*» Tk.U

ItUlMdVUS VA
leather are perfect their paper wat
erproof coats are bought by the cap
tains of ships for their exposed boats'
crews their own clocks are good,
and they have imitated our watches,
they walk about with
44
pedometers
I
n
attached to their belts, and they are
not backward in copper-plate engrav
ing and perspective. Their china is
far superior to the Chinese.
The country abounds in coal,
though they only use that found ck)M
to the surface but even that, a sort
of bituminous scale, is good. In gold
and silver they could almost rival
Mexico and Australia iron, copper
and tin are found in profusion. An
Englishman at Yokohama gave a
Japanese a piece of English cotton
shirting in a few days the man
brought back two pieces, and the for
mer nad much difficulty in saving
which was his,
bo
cloeely had ft
initmatod.
A funny story going tbe rounds
in Paris A lady in the first society
recently was oblige to dismiss her
nurse oa account of an excess of fire
men aad private soldiers too often re
peated. After choosing as a success
or to this criminal a very pretty girl,
the lady, explaining why the first was
sent away enjoined it on the second
not to do likewise. Shu admitted that
she shouldn't. I can endure a great
deal," said the lady, but soldiers in
the kitchen I teonU endure." After
a week or eight days, the lady came
one luoriiitig in the kitchen, opened a
cupboard and discovered a youthful
military character. Oh, ma'm!"
cried the girl, frightened, I give you
my word I never saw that soldier be
fore in all my life, he Bust have been
one of the old ones left over by the
other girl!"
A dinner was given near Paris the
other day, of which the principal dish
es were shark, horse, dog and rat.
Sentimental youth—"My dear girl,
will you share my lot for life
Practical girl—" How many acre*
are there in your lot, sir t"
1 will extend no other mercy ta
you, said a prince to a jester, who fcr
a fault was condemned to death.
except permitting you to choose
what kind of death you will die. Dc
cide immediately, for I will be obeyed,
—I adore your clemency said the
jester, I choose to die of old age,'*

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