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The bee. (Earlington, Ky.) 1889-19??, August 11, 1916, Image 1

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Tciesclay
Tuesday
AND.
AND
Friday
Afternoon
fridaij
Afternoon
TRADE WHERE YOU LIVE OR LIVE WHERE YOU TRADE
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
EARLINGTON, HOPK'NS COUNTY, KY.. FRWA). AUGUST 11, 1916
No. 63
CHAUTAUQUA
TENT NOW
ERECTED
And First Number Will
Given Tomorrow Even
ing, at 2:30 P. M.
be
LARGE CROWDS ARE EXPECTED
Everything is in readiness for Earl-
ington's first Chautauqua. The big
tent is up, comfortable seats placed,
and all arrangements for the comfort
of Chautauqua patrons. A large
number of tickets have been sold and
a great deal ot interest is being dis
played. Following is the program
for the three days.
First Day, Aug. 12
2:30 p. m. Opening Concert by the
Capital City ConcertOo.
3:00 p. m, Cartoon Lecture, Chas
F. Stalker,
7:30 p. m. Prelude Concert, Capi
. tal City Company.
8:00 p. m. Chart Talk by Chas. F.
Stalker.
1 Second Day, Aug. 14.
2:30 p. m. Angelo Minnetti, Piano
Accordionist.
2:50 p. m. Entertainment, Irwin,
Prince of Magic
3:10 p. m. "My Experience in Tur
key," Lieut Donald McQibney.
750 p. m. Piano ACcorion Concert
by Minnetti.
S:00 p. m. Magic Entertainment by.
Irwin.
8:45 p. m. "My Experience in the
French Trenches," illustrated with
stereopticon views by Lieut Don
ald McGibney.
Third Day, Aug. 15.
.2 AO p. m. Orchestral Concert,
Dickson
the
3:0O p. m. "The Golden Now" or
'The Small Town ChurchLecture
by D. Wm II. Kent.
7:30 p. m. Grand Concert by the
Dickson Orchestra.
8:15 p. m. Closing lecture by
W. H. Kent, "Building Up
Home Town.
Dr
the
HOW TO KEEP WELL
DON'T DRINK
Dr.
W. A. Evans, Medical
Editor of the Chicago
Tribune, Says that Tem
perance is a Health
Matter
Heading his article 'Alcohol Versus
Health." Dr. W. A. Evans, in the
Chicago Tribune of August 1st. says:
"No health authority anywhere
advocates the use of alcohol as a
medicine, food, or beverage. Until
a few years ago health departments
were silent on the subject. At the
present time a considerable minority
of the health departments are actively
campaigning against drinking. Among
this minority are some of the best in
the country."
The contents of the - May Bulletin
of the New York City Health De
partment in opposition to the bever
age use of alcohol, Dr. Evans de
dares, "proves that it is bad from
every standpoint." He cites the re
search work of Insurance men as
proof that "moderate" drinking has
a distinctly bad effect upon life ex
pectation.
"Veoetablo Wool" Valuable,
Torto Itlco's "vegetable wool" la
highly esteemed for filling pillows, up.
bolster uses and the llko. It la used
In England for the manufacture ot bata
irq
known as "castors." The 'wool
. .1.-
HrlM fiw hn,it tho Head of tha tree.
luo
The fiber looks and feels like wool or
fur. It is solt and silky.
TRAINMEN HURT
IN L&J. WRECK
Engineer Riordan and Fire
man Barnett Severely
Hurt When Train
S3 Ditched at
Slaughters
Several trainmen were injured, one
probably serious; four cars were de
molished and many passengers w6re
slightly bruised and shaken when L
& N. southbound train, No. G3, due
in Earlington at 4:30 a. m left the
rails at Slaughters early Wednesday
morning and plunged into the em
bankment. The accident was caused
by a broken guard on a switch just
north of the station.
The locomotive, after leaving the
track, plowed along the track tor a
distance of about 200 feet, tearing
down several telephone poles and
plunging into the concrete walk and
turning over. The next car to the
engine, a supply through mail coach,
telescoped into the rear of the engine
crosswise, while the second car jump
ed over the car and engine and piled
up about 200 feet in front. Four mail
clerks were in the car that jumped
anu it is a miracle their lives were
saved. The next two cars, an ex
press and a baggage car, crashed into
the first mail' car and engine and were
partially destroyed.
The most seriously injured train
man was-Fireman Chas. Barnett, of
Nashville, who was severely scalded
and suffered internal injuries. It is
thoutrht Harnett will die. The others
injured were: Engineer Riordan, Bag
gageman James Warren, Mail Clerk
Waldman, Loster, AldmonandLee
Harris, the last named living in Mad-
isonville. Of the latter, Warren suf
fered the most with a broken leg.
Arthur Hargrove, negro of Madison-
ville, a driver for John Long's Bak-
ery, was injured as was Oscar Reed,
negro, both passengers.
The negro passenger coach left the
track and bruised several occupants,
the white passenger coach directly
behind, also left the track. Only
slieht lars were experienced by the
occupants of the latter coach. Engin
eer Riordan was at first thought kill
ed, but was found on top of the en
gine where he had crawled through
after the accident. Barnett, the fire
man, was pinioned under the engine
for at least half an hour before being
released.
Lee Harris, of Madisonville, suf
fered a badly bruised leg and other
injuries and returned to his home im
mediately after the accident in an
automobile. The other badly in
jured persons were taken to the hospl
tal in Evansville.-
Two wreckers, one trom this city,
the other from Howell, arrived on the
scene about six o'clock. The only two
trains delayed were the Dixie Flyer.
No. 05 and No. 92. No, 05 arrived in
the city about 12 o'clock, carrying
part of 53's sleepers.
Dr. Frank Bassett, former presi
dent of the Kitty League, was a pas
senger on the train and assisted in
the rescue work. E. L. Wise, train
master, arrived on the scene early
and stated that in his 3 1 years' ex
perience with the L. & N. Railroad
on this division no passenger had ev
er been killed. This is quite a re
markable record.
BRICK SOUTH
WORTH RESIGNS
First Lieut. Brick Bouthworth, of
3rd Regt. K. N. G. has resigned his
fnmmlwnn. whlph has bn accnt-
. " " r-
I , ... ,. ..... . ,, .1 iilj.l.
uy wc wji wjmhuisih h u u-
lineton, and he will be home in a
few days.
THOSE THAT HAVE-GET w weston I
FOR THIS DESlGrt J 4k(v AfeR OA S
S.AUHEADV..-- gS2 2 SHE LP lljig
ATtmAi. C4rAt tViCg 6OA4ytCt
SOME OF THE
MANY INTER
ESTING THINGS
To be Seen on the Bee's
All
River Trip to the
Mammoth
Cave
LEAVING SATURDAY AUGUST, ,26
When the Bee's party about foriy
strong, leave Evansville on Saturday,
Aug. 26th, on the steamer Evansviil;
they will stare on one of the most in
teresting 412 mile river trips in this
country. Among other things they
will pass through six locks as follows:
Lock No. 1 at Spottsville, Lock No.
2 at Rurmey, Lock No. 3 at Roches
ter, Lock No. i at Woodbury, Lock
No. 5 at Massye Springs. Lock No.
6 at Brownsville. In addition to the
novelty of passing through these
locks the party will have the oppor
tunity of viewing some of the most
magnificent scenery on upper green
river there is to be seen anywhere,
the huge masses of rocks are piled
up 20O feet bigh along the banks of
.the river reminding one of some of
the old castles in England and Scott
land described by Sir Walter Scott
in Waverly Novels. The delightful
scenery is not all, one of the chief
pleasures of a river trip is to gather
on the upper deck after supper and
watch the passing scenery by moon
light while enjoying tlie cool river
breeze and listening to sweet strains
of music from the band below.
On these river trips everyone is al
lowed to do as they please as long as
they please to do right. Everything
possible is done for the comfort and
enjoyment of all and it is just like a
bis house party. If you wish to
shoot turtles off the logs, alright;
you wish to dance, music is furnished;
if vou wish to play "500"' eo to it
if you wish to read, take kodak pic
tures, go in the engine room or up in
the pilot house, watch the deck hands
ride calves and pies down the bank
into the river, you are free to do so,
and nothing is said or thought about
it, as the boat crew from Capt Wil
liams down, want you tohave a good
time. When you get to the cave
your baggage is looked after and you
have nothing to do but eat breakfast
and get on your cave suit preparatory
to taking one of the routes.
If you have ever been in
Mam
moth Cave you will never forget it
If you have never .been you will al
ways regret it. It is one of the great
eit of nature's many great wonders
TWO GOOD HOTELS
CONSOLIDATED
The "Old Inn and "Louis
ville Hotel" Now Under
One Managment
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN
Two of the best hotels in Louis
ville have consoiidated and are now
being conducted under one manag
ment and guests may stop at I he
Louisville Hotel on the 'American
or European plan. People who have
recently patronized this hotel under
the; A merican plan say they serve the
best meals this side the Ohio river.
The "Old Inn" is well known to
a. 1 t . 1
everyone, especially Kemucicy poli
ticians, and the cafe at the Old inn
is unquestionably the best eating place
in Kentucky. If you wish an extra
good steak or sea food of any kind,
pay a visit to the Old Inn ana you
will not be disappointed. Both ho
tels hot and cold water, telephones in
every room, and all other modern
improvements mat win aua io ic
comfort and convenience of guests.
If you stop at either the Louisville
Hotel or the Old Inn while in Louis-
vlile, you are assured of the very
best service at a reasonable price.
people come from all parts -of the
country and from across the ocean to
see this wonderful subteraneous cav
em and are astonished at its magni
tude and granduer. Mammoth Cave
lies at your very door and you will
have an opportunity to see it under
the most favorable tircumstances by
going with the Bee's party on Satur
day Aug. 20th. The cost of the en
tire trip with all expenses paid will
be $17.50 from Earlingtcn and $15.00
from Evansville. Anyone wishing to
take this trip may do so by sending
their name and $2 00 on or before
Friday noon Aug. 25th so their state
room may De reserved a special
coach will be put on Train 52 at this
place Saturday, Aug. 26th and on
Train 9 3 at Evansville Wednesday
night, Aug. 30th, for the accomoda
tion of the party. For further par
ticulars call on or address "1 he Bee'
Earlington, Ky.
Standing Browning
Brothers Contest
Hattie Polk Crenshaw 9,595
Thelmi West 5,395
. Margaret Hill 1,335
Mrs. Ed Hamer 0,38.0
Miss Frances McElfatrick- 0,445
Bessie Mae Burton ....9,825
Fern Nichols -,.8 249
A TREAT YOU
MUST NOT MISS
Will be The Pennyroyal Fair
at Hopkinsville on Aug
ust 29 to Sept. 2.
The Pennyroyal fair this year will
be held at Hopkinsville on Aug. 20
to Sept. 2, just a month earlier than
has been the case heretofore. This
is for the purpose of giving assurance
of better weather than has been ex
perienced in the past. Especially last
year the heavy and continued rains
seriously interfered with the attend
ance, at the fair and also with the out
of door features, so this year the
management decided to hold it earl
ier. The fair this time promises to
be the best yet given. Nothing has
been spared to make this the case
and all five of the days are expected
to be banner days. Every depart-
Jment will be filled to overflowing
with exhibits for the prize lists are
unusually generous and cover prac-
tically everything growrl on the farm
or made by the housekeeper. The
official catalogue is jnst off the press
and copies can be secured, by calling
on or writing to John W. Richards,
the secretary.
RESOLUTIONS
OF RESPECT TO
A. R, BAUGH
Whereas, Our Heavenly Father, in
his infinite love, has again entered
our Citadel and removed from our
midst our beloved brother A. R.
Baugh. Therefore be it
Resolved, That Earlington Com-
mandery, No, 525, U. O. G. C. has
lost a beloved and faithful member,
the wife a devoted and loving hus
band.
Resolved, That, out of respect to
him whose memory will ever be hon
ored for his loyalty to our order and
the good he has done for mankind,
that our charter be draped for .thirty
days, also a copy of these resolutions
be placed on our records and a copy
be sent to "The Bee" for publication
J. B.Wyatt
J. M. Kestner
Bertha B. Umstead.
Committee
RESOLUTIONS
OF RESPECTS
At a regular meeting of Earlington
Lodge No. 10 D. of H., the follow
ing resolutions were adopted:
Whereas, It has has pleased the
Supreme Ruler of the universe to re
move from our midst Brother A. R
Baugh. Resolved,'
That we bow in humble submis
sion to the will of Him who has giv
en and taken away, remembering we
too must soon answer the call of the
grim Reaper. Resolved,
That we tender our warmest sym
pathy to the bereaved wife in her
hour of affliction and exhort her to
seek solace from him, who alone can
comfort the broken hearted. Re
solved, In the death of Bro. Baugh this
Lodge has lost an exemplary member
his wife an affectionate husband, and
community a useful citizen and these
resolutions put on the minutes of the
Recorders Book, also placed in Eail
ington Bee and Review of D, of fl.
yZq. Walker
E. R. Barnett
Miss Lizzie Huff
Essay on Hermits.
A hermit ts always tbo center ot
much Interest, though no ono knows
vtbjr. It ho -wore really Interesting be
wouldn't ba a hermit Kansas CU7
'Star.
AGREES TO
MEDIATION'-
Brotherhoods Accent Offer
of Railway Managers
EDERAL BOARD OF
MEDIATION WILL SETTLE
THE CONTROVERSY
New York, Aug. 9. The
threatened strike of 400,000
railroad workers was avert
ed today when the represen-
tatives of the Trainmen's
Brotherhoods agreed to ac
cept the proffer of arbitra
tion of the federal board of
mediation.
New York, Aug. 0. Whether the
threatened strike of 400,000 railway
employes thruout the United States
would be averted through mediation
of the federal board of mediation and
conciliation depended today upon
whether the railroad brotherhoodsvo
were willing to accept the services oE-JJ
that body.
Thenational conference of railroad
managers today rejected the men's
demands and proposed that they be
mediated by the federal tribunal. The.
brotherhoods refusing to join in an
appeal to the tribunal, the railroads,
made an individual appeal.
The federal board, which is in ses
sion here, then offered jts services to
the brotherhoods and were awaiting:
their reply.
TRY IT! SUBSTITUTE-
FOR NASTY CALOMEL, , j
Starts your liver without mik
ing you sick and can not
salivate
Every druggist in town you
druggist and everybodys drnegis
has noticed a great falling-off in
the sale of calomel.
They all give the same reason.
Dodson's Liver Tone is taking
its place.
''Calomel is dangerous an
people know it, while Dodson
Lwer Tone is perfectly safe and
gives better result?," said a prom
inient local druggist. Dodson'ar
Liver Tone is personallp guar
anteed by every druggist wh
soils it. A large bottle costs G
cent, and if it fails to give easy
relief in every case of liver slug
gishness and constipation, yon
have only to ask for your money
back.
Dodson'i Liver Tone is a pleas
ant-tasting, purely vegetable-
remedy, harmless to both child
ren and adults. Take a spoon-1
ful at night and wake up feeling
fine; no biliousness, sick head
ache, acid siomacli or constipated
bowels. It boesn't gripe or causo
inconvenience all the'next day
like violent -calomel. Take a dnao
of calomel today and tomorrow
you will feel we&k, sick and nau
seated.
Dou't lose a day'd work! Taket
Dndson's Liver Tone instead and
feel fine, full of vigor aud am
bition.
Standing of Idle
Hour Contest
Elizabeth Long 18,510
Sue Wade Davis... 19,100
Gladys Whitford 710
Margaret Cowand. . . . v 100
Julia Fawcett 325
May me Foster 100
Beatrice Delaney ....100
Corrinne Ashby ICO
Lona Deshon 105
Guthbert Vinson..... 100
1
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