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The Nome nugget. (Nome, Alaska) 1919-1934, May 13, 1922, Image 3

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THE NOME NUOOET
AN INOEPBNOENT NEWSPAPER.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY—EVERY SATURDAY AFTERNOON.
• 10. B. NAYNARBi.. Sow Owiw PuMiehw.
L friths* — 9mm Manor. at ttw M«»» «t Nwa Ataif.
i Ait W MsmIi i. 1W».
SUBSCRIPT ION* PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
iwii.. ..................... .f^.* rffcr MO
tat dally teloSrnph boROOn mni iMMr aiWWhptr
J Ot UeiOn EMtlOM*
i Rib sister ■ Off or R Buy wit) notify «• oOw tiruiptty
I er ftresnlWhy l> He miner « Hair :
HiWW wAtBEHam
Safe
.PrSperty KlUtM. Sir Baa; per lam.
' iMUtl'a Bale, per tDM par lane.
f Hr Patau 9 lamp, par line.
Nets* m FPtMfeIre. atafle OlaM* 13 Untie.
PirSIKim Hatton. AMltUaal Watni, each.
StUr JUTSKEUns not specified. per. Itne, per. ieene..31
PV»r fdHber Information ut aOverttolna rate! laply at Nn**et offk

sss
Love your enemies and never misuse your rivals; excel other , but
do not exalt yourself; honor the honor in men that they may own you
as their brother.
MUST THINK IX TKKMS OF COMMUNITY WELFARE.
Men. in organizations banded together for the community weal,
must hold before themselves, at all times, that which redounds to the.
best interests of the community in which they live, if they wish to be
successful and obtain the support of the community.
For individual members of these institutions to think only of their
personal prestige and aggrandizement spells failure for the true interests
of the community.
Ulterior motives and vain-glorious flaunting of an overwhelming
ego do not coordinate with true community welfare. They must think
and act within less circumscribed terms and areas and practice what
they preach.
The Nugget stands ready and willing to cooperate with all organiza
tions which practice the true civic spirit and pride, holding as its slogan
"the greatest good for the greatest number.”
WHAT SEN. WAIM*WORTH FORESAW IN LKAttl'K OF NATIONS
It is announced that a delegation representing the Collfns-Griffith
party in Ireland is on the way to this country to secure support of Ameri
cans of Irish blood, and that another delegation representing the Do Va
lera faction is in hot pursuit with a view to securing the same backing
for the De Valerians. The two groups of delegates will doubtless makf
It interesting in this country as they argue their claims before, then
«ve^|n ^forum. Officially the United States will, of course, remain
neutral, but undoubtedly a number of members of Congress will bi
apprised by mail, by telegrah. and by personal visits of what is going on.
It is but natural that each side in the Irish dispute should seek suppoii
wherever it may be found, but it is hardly to be expected that either sidv
will demand such support as an expression of our foreign policy.
Nevertheless, the occasion suggests vividly what, would have hap
pened had this country been dragged into the league of nations, a situation
the possibilities of which were ably depicted by Senator James Wads
worth, Jr., of New York, in his attack on the Wilson league covenant. A
dispute might have arisen in Poland, or in Italy, or in a number of otbei
countries having a large representation in the United States, and imme
diateiy the dispute would have extended to~~the representatives in thin
country and would have been carried by them to Congress, or to the
Executive, and all the pressure of votes and the promises of campaign
funds would have been brought to bear to secure American support of
the one side or the other. Or. again, two countries each having a large
representation here, would quarrel over a boundary line—Austria, and
Italy, for example—and again the power of the United States would be
Involved to bring pressure to bear on the league to decide the matter in
favor of this or that party.
- The result would have been unceasing turmoil in our ^wn body
politic because the politics of Europe and the rest of the world had been
transfused into the political veins of the United States. Official action
would not have been hoped for, it would have been demanded, and as a
member of t,he league we could not have evaded commitment on the score
Of neutrality. That is one of the many things we escaped by refusing to
join the league.—Exchange.
Even though the United States is not to be at Genoa, there Is
nothing to prevent this country from endorsing any decisions that may
be arrived at by the participants, and aiding in every proper way in
carrying them out. Let the European nations get together and work out
a practical plan for their own rehabilitation. There will be found no
lack of cooperation in the United States, so far it may be extended without
doing violence, to American traditions and policies.—Exchange.
MOVING THE CAPItOI,
Much agitated indeed are the people of the western part of the
Third division, at Seward and Anchorage, relative to the moving of the
Capitol from Juneau to the westward. And yet it appears that if the
government ever should fall for their propaganda that the country out
there would be split asunder, with Seward fighting Anchorage and Anchor
age lambasting Seward.
All of tjhe candidates for the legislature in the Third division are
pledging themselves to work for the removal of the Capitol. It is a
popular vote-getter out there hud It is a certainty that no candidate not
iu favor of it could be elected from the Third division.
So. when the next legislature meets the drive will start and it is
possible, even probable that the Third will have a substantial backing in
the delegation from the Fourth division. The Second division ran make
no possible gain by the removal of the Capitol to th*; Third division, so,
the representatives and senators frOm the Bering sea section may he
Whipped into line with the first. At least, this seems the only hope of
avoiding adverse action by the legislature
There is a business, an economic tie between the First and Third j
division that does not exist between the First and Second or Fourth, j
■The industries of the First and Third are similar, fisheries, timber and hard j
rocM mining and it is deplorable that they should split over such a thine
;as a Capitol1 building.
So far as Kejchlkan is concerned, it makes little difference whether
•the Capital is at Juneau. Anchorage, Seward or Nome. Ketchikan derives
no financial benefit from the Capitol or the employes of the Capitol, so that
jlte views may be said to be those of an outsider1 and it can see no reason
Iwiiy the government should go to the expense of removing the Capitol
[or o{ having it atlll farther from Washington than it is at the present time.
• And, if Anchorage and Seward are determined to hove a Capitol
jit would appear that it would be to their interest in joining the First
division in an-attempt to divide the Territory, making the Panhandle one
and all the mainland of Alaska another Territory. In that way Juneau
could retain its Capitol and Anchorage or Seward could gratify the am
■bitlon of one or the other. It is a certainty that they are barking up
the wrong tree in their attempt to take away from one town in Alaska that
[which it already has.—Ketchikan Chronicle.
MR. Ml'L TRYING TO MARK WATER RlV I P-HIIJ.
Mr. Paul, in addition to urging that the abolishment of the fish
traps 5s necessary in order to provide the Indians with an opportunity to
make enough money during the brief salmon packing season to support
them for the remainder of the year, contend that it was very clear that
it was trap fishing that is causing the depletion of the salmon supply in
Alaska .
The thing that is causing the depletion of the salmon supply in
Alaska js the catching of too many fish.. It is not a question of how the
fish are caught but one of the quantity that are caught The salmon sup
ply would be exhausted if too many fish were caught hv seines or by troll
ing or killed with spears.
Let the people of Alaska have charge of the fisheries and they |
would find an equitable method of restricting the fishing unless the pack-1
era would do it before they could.
The suggestion that the restriction should be brought about by i
abolishing scientific and efficient methods of procedure is absurd. Sup
pose, for instance, when we had a paper shortage Congress had required •
the newspapers to put away their linotype machines and set their type!
by hand. This would have curtailed th< size of the newspapers and
conserved the paper supply. Instead the papers were required to reduce
their size but permitted to use their scientific equipment. Which was the
sane course to pursue?
The trouble with Mr. Paul is that he is trying to make water run
up hill. Union Labor discovered many years ago that it were worse
than folly to oppose the application of scientific methods and labor saving
equipment to industry.—Juneau Empire.
[KHi TEAM MAH/ SERVICE FOR WINTER ENDED.
TRAPPERS - TRADERS
SHIP "TO
GEORGE R. OOSHAW UK.
Dealer in Raw Furs
NEW YORK—127 W. 27th St.
SEATTLE—ALASKA BUILDING
Ship direct to Ney York for highest prices paid for Raw Furs.
Your'shipments are handled by expert graders and New York Market
Prices are paid on correct grading the day received. If desired, your
.‘hippneots will he kept separate in order that our prices m«y be ap-v
proved by you. Providing that our valuation does not prove satis
factory, the Furs will be returned to you, transportation charges pre
paid. Ship by Insured Parcel Post or Express. Ship in a dry con
dition. Always enclose an itemized list of contents with naie and
address. Also place duplicate list on the outside of package or bale.
Ad payments are made by check on the Seattle National Bank, or in
any other manner desired. Special instructions, if any. to accompany
shipment.
SHIP YOUR FURS TO U8 NOW
GOLDEN GATE HOTEL
MS. SWARTZELL. Prop.
Best Accomodations in Alaska
STEAM HEATED, ELECTRIC LIGHTED
BATHS IN CONNECTION.
SSSSSSXifiSX'fiirSSSS
» h. K. WK1TH *
» NOTARY PVTBL1C *
* AT MGOKT OI'FII E »
WMWlRill!SW!R!fi!ft!R!IS!R!RS9
JfUW AW CPTODAVI Offi UK)A*
itoN AND PROSPRCTOXO
Or ad* at the Sam Xagget 0#r*
ioli«cr!bc NOW for trie Non.* Nog#»t
NOTICE OF HALB OF
real property.
IN TpfR PROBATE COURT IN AND
FOR THE PRECINCT OF CAP^
NOSRE. eECONO tftnstOK TER
RITORY OF ALASKA.
In tKis matter of the Estate of
OAfffftL LINEMAN deceased
Notice fa hereby Riven, that in
pursuance of an order duly made by
the above entitled Court ou the 28th
day of April, 1#22, the undersigned
administrator of the above estate,
will sell at publtr auction to the
highest bidder for cash, subject to
the confirmation of paid court, on
Saturday tbp 3rd day of June, 1922.
at the hour of 12 o’clock noon of
said day, at the office of the United
States Commissioner for said pre
cinet and territory, in Nome. Alaska,
all the right, title and interest of the
said Daniel Linehan at the time of '
his death, in those certain placer j
mining claims located on the Kon
garok River, in said territory and I
precinct, known and described as j
follows:
That certain placer mining claim I
known and described as No.21 above
Allen's Discovery on the Kougarok ^
An undivided one-half (%) inter
est In placer mining claim known i
as No. 2 North Fork of the Kotiga
Terms and conditions of sale: j
2rtcj payable in rash to the under- i
signed on day of sale, and the bal
ance upon the confirmation of sale
by the above entitled court and do- ;
livery of deed of conveyance.
Dated at Nome. Alaska, April 28.!
1922. i
BARNEY GIBNEY. j
Administrator of the Estate of i
Daniel Linehan. deceased.
Publish April SO, May «, 13, 'MK 27.
NOTICE OF FINAL HEARING 1
IN THE PROBATE COURT IN AND ’
FOR THE PRECINCT OF ST
MICHAEL. SECOND DIVISION.
TERRITORY OF ALASKA.
dersigned Administrator of the
above Estate having filed his final
account therein according to law.
further Notice is given that the Final,
Hearing of said account and objec
tions thereto will be bad at the |
Office of F. P. Williams. U. S.j
Commissioner and Judge of Probate,
in St. Michael. Alaska, on Saturday.,
June 17th. 1922. at 2 o’clock p. m. !
Dated at St. Michael. Alaska, this
17th day of April, 1922.
ARCH MUIR.
j Publish April 29,May C. 13. 20, 1922
j MINERAL APPLICATION
NO. 0544
IT. S. LAND OFFICE.
NOME, ALASKA.
March 27th. 1922.
NOTICE IS IIEKEUr LIVEN,
that Alexander Z. Watson. whose
post office address is 39 W. Adams
Street. Chicago, III., has. through
.James M. St ree tea, his authorized
agent, whose address is Nome. Al
aska, made application before the
United States Land Office at Nome.
Alaska, for a United States Patent
[for the May Association placer min
;in*r claim, situate or and along the
L. L. of Anvil Creek aad north of
-Snake Htvcr t« the Cape Nome Min
fin* and Rerawdimt Distal'f. Terri
tory of Alaska, and designated by
the United States Surveyor General
of Alaska os Mineral Suirey No.
1283; the exterior boundaries of
which claim, according to th** plat
and fie«d t olea of said survey, now
on file *n said land office fwith a
variation of froM 17 deg. 13 rain.
E. to 1!» deg. 42 min. E.) being
ar. follows:
Beginning at Cor. No. 1. whence
IT. 5?. L. M. No. 13 hears N. 69
deg. 47 min. 7.1 ft., thence
N. 30 deg. 30 min. W.. 1997.1 ft.
to Cor. No. 2; thence N. 89 deg.
44 miif. E.. 424.9 ft. to Cor. No.
3; thence X. 17 ties. 4 4 min. E.,
517.1 ft. to Cor. No. 4; thence S.
81 deg. 11 min. E.. 906.4 ft. to
Cor. No. 5, identical with Cor. No.
3. Stir. No. 741. No. 15 Below on
Little Cieck; thence S. 21 deg. 19
min. E. 653.7 ft. to Cor. No. 6;
thence S. 86 deg. 24 min. E., 747.
ft. to Cor. No. 7; thence S. 81 des*.
2 min. E. 1388.9 ft. to Cor. No.
8; thence N. 69 deg. 4 min. E..
1299.8 ft. to Cor. No. 9; thence
X. 67 deg. 4 min. E. 870 ft. to
Cor. No. 10; thence S. 54 deg. 41
min. W.. 1647.7 ft. to Cor. No.
11; thence S. 2 deg. 37 min. K.
347.5 ft. to Cor. No. 12; thence
S. 26 deg. 32 min. W.. 614 ft. to
Cor. No. 13; thence S. 67 deg. 12
min. W.. 843. S ft. to Cor. No. 14;
thence N. S6 deg. 10 min. W..
2459.6 ft to Cor. No. 1. place of
beginning, containing an area of
The adjoining claims are; on the
N.. Nos 12. 13 and 14 Below on
Little Creek. Survey No. 742. and
No. 15 Below on Little Creek. Sur
vey No. 741. and Snyder Group No.
2 Tundra, Survey No. 740; on the
S., the Dover Association. Survey
claims unknown and unsurveyed.
U. S. L. M. No. 13 is a fir post
in earth mound, situate on the divide
between Little Creek and Snake
River, about l-Vj miles northwest of
the Town of Nome. Latitude 64
deg. 32 min. X. Longitude 165
JOHN SUNDBACK.
Publish April 1. S. 15, 22, 29, May
•WANTED—PmMoh by exper
ienced bookkeeper and stenogra
pher. .bldr««N Harci Oxeuder.
Box 173, Havre, .Montana, V. S. A.”
4 ct* a day will bring the W
Nugget to your horn*
A I, 1. TOGETHER X O W-1* U L L !
Spit on your hands, Ret a pood hold on the Seward Peninsula
bonds of affiliation, and pull 'em up closer. A chain may be
only as strong as its weakest link, BUT WITHOUT A CHAIN',
THERE IS XO STRENGTH AT AI.L. .Even a ptarmigan and
a timber wolf know there is power in E Pluribus Ununi.
For a long time the different localities of this District have
been backsliding into little hermit villages; there has been a
frightful lack of co-ordination. We have pulled at Congres
sional influence from every point on the compass, with the re
sult that we haven't gotten anywhere. We have been like
some dog teams we all know of: ‘Geeing’' aud '‘Hawing”
when the command was Straight Ahead.
The NUGGET wants a weekly news letter from every settle
ment in the District. It wants to print your activities, social
and otherwise, and it wants the feelings and expressions of
your community on the big issues confronting us all. It
wants your support by subscription. A larger paper means a
better paper. Buy it; read It, and send us yonr suggestions
as to how to better it. We would like to be a perfect mirror
of the Peninsula's thoughts and desires. This will require
teamwork.
Just laying back there in your cabin, grumbling and growl
ing to yourself wont l^lp any. Clear, constructive criticism,
though, when given the light of day may accomplish wonders.
Get together. Appoint someone in your community as cor
respondent and let the World know you haven't hibernated for
the winter. We might suggest that your local school teach
ers be interested in writing up your activities, and we wMl
make substantial remuneration for their literary labors.
Let's show them we are interested in ourselves.

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