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The Nome daily nugget. [volume] (Nome, Alaska) 1934-1938, November 08, 1934, Image 1

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Oldest Newspaper in Alaska. _ - Member of The Associated Press
DEVOTED TO THE BUILDING OF A BETTER NOME AND THE SECOND DIVISION^
NOME IS THE STRATEGIC WORLD FLIGHT AIR BASE—ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR COMMERCIAL AND MILITARY AVIATION
THE NOME DAILY NUGGET
vounm u. nTik ~ home. Alaska. Thursday, wov. 8th mm. p" Co|,r' 10 Ce°b
FI .FfTlONS VIGOROUSLY UPHOLD NEW DEAL
GREATER NOME RISING FROM EFFECTS FIRE
NEWER AND GREATER NOME IS
EMERGING FROM CHAOS OF
DISASTROUS FIRE SEPT- 17TH
♦ • _
Beginning today, The Nome Daily Nugget is publishing
its first edition since the fire of September 17th, in which
practically every business house in Nome was burned to
the ground. The publication is being printed on new mach
inery in its new plant located at the East end of Nome, near
the Federated Church.
During the time from the date of the fire no newspaper
has been published, but The Nome Nugget in connection
with the FERA Bulletin has issued daily news and reports
of the Federal Committee* which was handling the situation
of relief and re-organization.
Today, looking over Nome, a witness may see the enter
prising spirit and courage being displayed by the business
people and citizens of Nome. New business houses, homes
and work shops are springing up in all sections of the city.
Nothing finer can typify the enduring spirit and energy of
progress than the sight of the business district of Nome, ris
ing from the ruins of the old city. New, well-constructed
buildings are being built, many on the very same spot on
which they were, formerly located. Men are at work, dis
playing feverish activity in getting the buildings erected
and in condition for occupancy before the heavy blizzards
and cold weather sets in, which will put and end to working
out of doors during the stormy months of December and
January- _ !
Nome, which but a few short hours before the disastrous
conflagration, was making plans for one of its busiest win
ters and seasons during the past number of years, is now
growing into a finer, greater and much more desireable
community. During the interim when merchants awaited
their new stocks from the States and during which time
building could not go ahead because of lack of materials,,
plans were made for a better city, to be constructed along
safe, modem and economic lines. Streets were widened, av
enues cut through into arterials leading into, and out of
Nome. The thousands of tons of debris which lay in the
wake of the blaze were removed and levelling and const
ructive work laid out.
Concluding a most successful mining and business season
for this district, Nome was visited by the greatest disaster
in its history of thirty-five years. In many ways the razing
of old, time-worn, eye-sores, and the burning down of po
tential fire-traps, may be a God-send to this city. Fortunate
ly not a life was lost, and many were the thanks given Him
that the fire did not occur at night, when it most certainly
would have resulted in many being burned to death.
One great good to come out of the fire is the feeling
among citizens of Nome, that henceforth we are one great
family devoted to the building of a city of which we can
be proud; one, in which our children will grow up through
their years of school, and assist in the development of a
country, which has long remained unclaimed and unrecog
nized.
Regretable, of course, are the thousands and thousands
of dollars damage inflicted by the flames, which took person
al belongings from almost everyone, and which they could
‘ never hope to replace at any cost. Many were the heartach
es over lost articles consumed by the fire. The personal loss
is astounding. Together with business people, the citizens
.and home-owners of Nome suffered an appalling tragedy.
Undaunted, they have prepared during the final week of
(Continued on Page Two) !
French Cabinet
Is Dissolved
(By The Associated Press)
PARIS, Nov. 7, The political truce
in the cabinet of Premier Doumer
gue, was wrecked today, when six
radical members led by Herriot, de
serted at the request of the radical
socialist party. Doumergue’s resig
nation will be sent to the president
Thursday.
Gendarmerie were placed around
the Chamber of Deputies and For
eign Office; police and mobile guard
units are hiding in side streets and
several hundred more soldiers are
concentratedin Invalides Station, as
it is feared there will be another
^ bloody outbreak of political war
fare.
* WATCH FOB THB NEW BUSI
NESS directory or nome
, _y -. ■■
Forty Thousand
Dollars is Cause
Mother Shooting
(By The Associated Press)
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 7, Shot
by her mother, in what police said
was a quarrel over a forty thous
and dollar estate of an aged rela
tive, Mrs. Amy Warren aged 25,
wife of a graduate student at Stan
ford University, is reported to be
in a serious condition. Her mother,
Mrs. Edna Chamberlin, aged 45, a
former actress, is also ih the hospi
tal under custody and being treated
for hysteria.
Police said the shooting occurred
at Mrs. Chamberlin’s home when
Mrs. Warren came from Palo Alto
to discuss affairs of her ninety-year
old relative P. L. McClure, who re
cently transferred his property to
the mother and her daughter.
DEMOCRATS
GAIN SEVEN
SEN. SEATS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8, A Demo
cratic senate that promises to remain
so for a decade, barring an opposi
tion landslide, was returned in the
elections by the New Dealers, who
not only held all their old trench
es, but captured seven Republican
strongholds.
In defeating such Republican stal
warts at Fess of Ohio, who was as
sistant floo rleader; Hebert of Rhode
Islahd; Walcott of Connecticutt; Ro
binson of Indiana; Patterson of Mis
souri; Kean of New Jersey; and Hat
field of West Virginia; the Demo
crats won the .largest membership
of any party in history. Sixty-seven
seats in the senate are now sure,
and they may have seventy.
The liberal element in the Repub
lican party, is now equal to the re
gular group. Not a single leader of
the Old Guard of two years ago, was
left in his seat.
New Deal Is
Tremendous In
Consequences
(By The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8, The el
ection returns settled several of the
political questions including the sta
tus of hte New Deal, but left sever
al other serious problems, potential
ly of far greater significance, Wholly
untouched.
The obvious conclusions drawn
from Tuesday’s elections, is that the
vast majority of voters , are willing
to go along wiht President Roose
velt, but beneath the obvious, runs
a set of implications embodying
much deeper possibilities. ,
The margin of Democratic control
is so great, and the power conferred
upon that party, so sweeping, that
national destiny itself may depend
on what the voters do with their
victory.
Candidates of almost every con
ceivable twist of opinion were swept
into office with mental processes
ranging from conservatism to bor
dering on sheer radicalism.
The big question now, is “Can this
party remain one?, and Which wing
left or right wlil become the con
trolling element?”
These questions point directly to
ward the 1936 presidential election,
and leaves the president free to
choose which way the party will
turn.
President Happy
Mandate People
United States
(By The Associated Press)
HYDE PARK, N. Y., Nov. 7, Pres
ident Franklyn D. Roosevelt is hap
py at the mandate of the people of
the nation *10 carry on the New
Deal, and today turned his full at
tention to public affairs.
He made no comment as yet, but
heis already thinking about the na
tion’s problems, and departed for
Washington, D. C., last night by
special train, to be at his desk this
morning.
Government leaders held the con
viction that the end of the campaign
would lead to more normal progress
of administration activities.
The President, beyond a doubt,
has a well developed picture of
national conditions after a summer
and fall of study while politics was
bi^bbling.
WASHINGTON
DEMOCRATS
VICTORIOUS
(By The Associated Press)
SEATTLE, Nov. 8, Lewis B. Sch
wellenbach, world war veteran, who
was marching under the banner of
the new deal, led his Democratic
cohorts to a smashing Victory over
his Rpeublican, former comrade in
arms, Reno Odlin.
Odlin was overwhelmed in an av
alanche of votes similar to the Dem
ocratic landslide o f1932 which sent
a complete Democratic delegation
to Congress for the first time in
years.
Every Democratic candidate roll
ed up impressive majorities over
their opponents excepting Knute
Hill, who had only a small lead in
the Fourth District over John W.
Summers, former congressman.
There were early indications that
the Democrats would retain control
over the state legislature, which
they gained two years ago for the
first time since 1896.
Democrats were laso running very
strong for county offices, a situation
almost unprecedented prior to this
time.
The Roosevelt voters also approv
ed of the Bone Power bill and the
abolii tfonoN
abolition of the fish traps, and the
re-enactment of the Forty Mill tax
limit law, by good majorities, on
their fight for state income tax and
state supervision of taxes by small
er units fo the government.
Supreme court justices Walter B.
Beals and Bruce Blake were unop
posed for reelection. James M. Ger
^ghty of Spokane continued to
maintain a substantial lead over
Ralph C. Bell, with half the re
turns in.
Majority Senate
Highest History
Party Politics
(By The Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8, For the
first time since the Republican par
ty was organized, just before the
Civil War, the Democrats have ob
tained more than a two-thirds ma
jority in the Senate of the United
States.
The selection of Democrats in
Nebraska in Tuesday’s election, gave
the party 66 seats, two more than
two thirds.
Joseph Galley, Democratic can
didate for the Senate in Pennsyl
vania against Republican David
Reed, gained a lead of more than
one hundred thousand.
Only four Republicans were de
finitely elected, and they are in Cal
ifornia, Delaware, Vermont and
Michigan. Maine elected a Republi
can in September, which gives the
Republicans only twenty-three seats
in the Senate.
Twenty-three Democratic senators
were chosen, eight of them captur
ing Republican seats.
Republicans falling before the on
slaught in Connecticut^ Indiana,
Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey,
Ohio, Rhode Island and West Virgin
ia gave a terrific shock to the na
tion as the Democratic landslide
continued its way un-broken.
Both Robert LaFollette, Progres
sive candidate for reelection to the
senate, and his brother Phil, run
ning on the same ticket, for Gov
ernor, were victorious.
In the contest for representatives,
the Democrats elected 234, and the
Republicans, 70, a majority of x
Republicans 70:
WATCH FOB THB NEW BUSI
NESS DIRECTORY OF NOME
DEMOCRATS WIN SWEEPING
VICTORY TUESDAY ELECTION
NATIONAL AS WELL AS STATE
(By The Associated Press)
SEATTLE, Oct. 7, Overwhelming
new deal strength in Congress was
guaranteed in mid-evening returns
last night which showed eight Re
publican seats counted by Demo
crats as won in the House. Mean
while it was listed at one hundred
and fourteen Democrats to twelve
Republicans.
Astatement by Postmaster Gen
eral Farley said “sufficient returns
show tjiat the wonderful victory of
the famous Republican figures had
toppled into oblivion.’’
First California reports from six
ty precincts out of fnore than ten
thousand, gave Merriam for Gover
nor 1400 lead over Sinclair.
Lewis B. Schwellenbach, Demo
crat, stepped to the front with a
substantial lead over Reno Odlin,
Republican, in early Washington re
turns, with seven hundred votes as
a lead in forty-six of the state’s
2835 precincts. i
Merriam continued to hold a lead
of 35,000 in 2696 of California’s
10,720 precincts.
All announced candidates and
speaker of the House Byrnes of,
Tenn., Reyburn of Texas, Rankin of
Mississippi, Green of Florida, Bank
head of Alabama and Mead of New
York, were elected.
On the basis of early returns,
Florida voted out its prohibition
laws and Kansas and Nebraska vot
ed to retain theirs.
WASHINGTON
ABOLISHES FISH
TRAPS VOTERS
(By The Associated Press)

SEATTLE, Nov e. suhte Electors
approved the initiative measure de
signed for, and which abolishes fish
traps. The latest tally showed there
were one hundred and fifty-one
thousand, six hundred and six yes,
and seventy six thousand, four hun
dred and sixty-two no’s.
Supporters of the measure said:
“This measure will provide for the
perpetuation of the salmon fisher
ies and save Washington’s third
largest industry, thus allowing for
a rehabilitation run of king and sil
ver salmon in Puget Sound, as the
fish traps take the larger share of
these species.”
SINCLAIR
CONCEDES
DEFEAT
(By The Associated Press)
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 7, Con
ceding defeat, Upton Sinclair charg
ed in a radio speech, that President
Roosevelt had promised him that
their interview would be broadcast
to the nation “on the principles of
production for the United States.”
The major tenets of Sinclair’s ep
ic plan were also to be broadcast.
He contended that in some two hun
dred speeches in the past fourteen
months he said:
“If you have not suffered enough
it is your God-given right to suf
ter some more.
Sinclair also congratulated his op
ponents on their victory, near mid
night last night.
Schwellenbach was definitely el
ected, defeating Odlin by a substan
tial majority. As the night went
on, the margin for the New Deal
victory, increased with even Penn
sylvania and Connecticutt, two of
the five strongest Republican stat
es, who went against Roosevelt two
years ago, cracking and giving Dem
ocratic senatorial candidates sub
stantial majorities. -»
Missouri Democratic
.. Missouri bad turned out its Re
publican senator, Roscoe C. Patter
son, for Democratic senator.. Har
ry S. Truman.
Indiana apparently ousted its vet
eran senator Arthur R. Robinson,
for Democratic senator Sherman
Minton. T".
* The House standing in the early
mprning hours after election, show
NEW DEAL GETS
BIG VICTORY IN
TUESDAY VOTE
NEW YORK, Nov. 7, Democrats"*
commanded varying leads for ten
Eiwtesn senatorial f^ita held
by the GOP, at midnight in the
East with Guffey’s lead in the moun
tains over Read in Pennsylvania,
the biggest upset was on the West
coast, however, Merriam is steadily
pulling away frorii Sinclair with
eighty thousand votes in the lead
with 4,898 precincts reported. Even
Los Angeles, his home county, turn
ing against Sinclair.
In Washington State, each of six
democrast for congressmen, are lead
ing with only one being close, that
is between Knute Hill, Democrat,
and former Congressman John W.
Summers of the Fourth District.
U. Students Will
Fight To Retain
*_
Freedom Speech
(By The Associated Press)
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 7, Stud
ent liberals continued plans for “de
fense of freedom of speech” at a
number of California institutions,
despite over-ripe tomato attacks.
Another meeting at the Univer
sity fo California, protesting against
the suspension of four students at
U. C. L. A., for alleged radical act
ivities, was called for the Berkeley
campus, where a liberal group was
booed and roughly treated last
week.
Latest disturbances occurred at
the San Mateo Junior College, when
a group from Berkeley, attempting
to promote a protest demonstration
was pelted with over-ripe tomatoes
and were later escorted to the pol
ice station for protection.
LAST LIGHTER FOR
S. S. ARTHUR J. BALDWIN
TOMORROW MORNING
10:00 A. M.
ARCTIC
TRANSPORT COMPANY
ed 172 Democrats and 35 Republic
ans, with the new deal instead of
losing some seats actually gained
seven. ^_

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