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The Seward gateway and the Alaska evening post. [volume] (Seward, Alaska) 1917-1918, February 02, 1917, Image 2

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S’puiarii Qiatf-uiag
and THE ALASKA EVENING POST.
Published Daily Except Sunday by The Gateway Publishing Company.
R. G. CHAMBERS, Business Manager. E. 0. SAWYER, Jr., Editor.
Published Daily Except on Sundays and Holidays.
Entered as second-clas9 matter September 2, 191; at the postoffice at
Seward, Alaska, under the act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES .
One year, in advance.-.i
Per month, delivered....
Ihe Alaska Weekly Post by mail...-.. 3 00
■ - L . .-:
A LITTLE FROSTY
Seward is experiencing the coldest weather of the
year today. Not only the coldest of this year, but sever
al degrees colder than the cold snap ot ordinary winters.
Seldom do thermometers in the business section show low-i
or than six below zero but there was no doubt about its
being ten below even in the warmest sections ol town this
morning. Even the “banana belt thermometer” in front
of the drug store showed eight below and it was guar
anteed not to go below zero. In the northern suburbs and
out along the line it has been extremely chilly, and little
old Mile 29 took the palm away from Mile 34 for the cold
est spot on the peninsula yesterday, when the mercury
stood at 52 below.
ALASKA’S SHOWING FOR THE YEAR i
Exceeding a total of 8110,000,000 for the calendar i
year ended December 81, 1910, the total commerce of Al
aska is still soaring. The year just ended is the first
twelve month period, either fiscal or calendar, that the
total has reached 8100.000,000, and it is a remarkable
showing, not only in the tremendous increases over 1915,;
1914 and 1913, but in view of the fact that the total for!
1910 is more than fifteen times the amount the Unitedj
States paid Russia for Alaska in 1808, thus proving for all!
time that Seward's “icebox’’ is some producer.
The figures for 1910 calendar year were arrived at by;
taking valuations as announced by 1. S. customs officials,
covering the products of Alaska shipped south and the
value of merchandise and equipment shipped north.
Of the segregated items, the value of copper comes
first, which will be represented by a total of very nearly
$40,000,000. Second in importance will be the valuation of
the products of fisheries, reaching a total almost of $19,
000,000, and third, the gold production, which will be
about normal, or near $1(5,000,000.
In northbound shipments, iron, steel and manufact
ures of these products rank first, with a valuation of more
than $7,000,000, this being accounted for in the great min
eral and railroad development now going on in the north.
There is not the slightest doubt hut that the year 1917
will show an increase over the figures for this year as min
eral, agricultural and railroad development are now go
ing on in a systematic manner throughout the territory,
and the building of the government railroad will open up
a vast mineral and some agricultural areas.—(Cordova
Times.)
THE MAELSTROM
Now is the time for man and woman living under the
American flag to remember that the United States is a
neutral power in regard to this world war, and to read
again the president’s proclamation, urging us to avoid
any act which might embitter.
It is apparent that this war is about to assume a more
dreadful phase. The fight is to be to the death, and peo
ples struggling for their place in the world know no law
but might in the last analysis.
What matters the rules of war to the soldier who has
Of Importance
to Men
We want you to know that our whole attention
is given to selecting merchandise of higher quality
that our many customers may be sure of complete
satisfaction when dealing with us.
EVERYTHING you will need in the clothing
line can be found in the complete stock we have
selected for you and
THE PRICES ARE RIGHT—WHY GO
ELSEWHERE.
The Miners' Store
Frank J. Cotter
A
HOTEL SEWARD
FORTY ROOMS-OUT OF FIRE ZONE
J. 0. PATTON, Prop. Rates by Day or Month
Modem Conveniences Well Lighted and Heated
PEACE AND PROSPERITY.
___ - — ■ — ■
I’M NOT
WORRYING!
boon bayoneted in the thigh and is trying to kill his ad
versary before the dreaded two feet of steel can be driven
home again into his vitals? Can the bomb thrower listen
to the supplication for mercy fro mthe man who is down,
when three feet away another propped on iiis elbow is pot
ting at him with an automatic? What can the “liquid fire
thrower do to save the wounded from burning to death
when a charge of the living is hurled at his position across
the held where they lie—Nothing! He must roast all he
can reach, or lose his own life and possibly the battle.
War is frightful and carnage run riot — and only
tiiose who can, survive.
We as a nation have several alternatives;
If we don’t like what one side is doing we can dip in
on behalf of the other—and pay the price. _
If we determine to keep out of the struggle we can
let our merchantmen take their own chances in running
ine blockades maintained by both sides. _
If there is danger of all our merchantmen being lost
in blockade running we can refuse to allow American bot
toms to clear for blockaded ports, and let the warring
countries do their own sea hauling.
Or we can ldt her go as she looks, taking such pre
cautions as are possible and make the best of it.
One thing is certain. The war is so nearly world
wide, that all of the neutrals together cannot enforce their
edicts against both sides at once.
The situation presents so many dreaded possibilities,
however, that the best men of the nation are giving it
their cloest attention, and it is mete that the rest of us
should “Lose wild tongues that hold not Thee in aw.”
THE WORLD’S GOLD
Before the outbreak of the war the greatest single
aggregation of gold was in the bank ol Russift, valued at
$600,000,000. The next largest aggregation was in the
Denver sub-treasury—value $500,000,000. At that time
the United States had more gold than both Russia and
France. It had more gold than the combined nations of
Great Britain, Germany, Austria and Italy.
American experts estimate that the world’s supply of
gold is valued at $8,000,000,000. Of this approximately,
$2,000,000,000, has been used in industry, leaving $6,000,
000,000 in the vaults of the various governments, and of
this amount today the United States possesses approxi
mately two-fifths.
UNIFORM OF U. S.
NAVY MEN MUST BE
ACCORDED RESPECT
I
NEW YOKE.—Respect must be ac
corded the uniform of the American
sailor equal to that given to the civi
lian’s clothes, the Brooklyn court of
I special sessions held today in decid
ing that Henry Traub, lessee of a
Brooklyn theatre, had no right to ex
clude Adolph Gottman, a sailor on the
battleship Arkansas. Traub wa* fin
ed $250. Thomas F. Cuff, United
States assistant district attorney,
! prosecuted Traub at the request of
the navy authorities.
BUTTE PAYROLL FOR
MONTH REACHES
I $2,509,000 MARK
BUTTE.—The December payroll of
the Butte mining companies was the
largest in history, the total for all
mines aggregating $2,509,000. Min- j
___I
JUST TO REMIND YOU
-of
Union Pacific System
Through Cars
between SEATTLE and Chicago
Kansas City. Denver
San Francisco. Los Angeles
Direct Connections for all
points East via the Famous
COLUMBIA RIVER ROUTE.
Trains protected all the way
—all the time by Automatic
Electric “Safety” Signals.
H. L. HUDSON. A. G. F. & P. A.
SEATTLE
ers are being paid $4.75 per day. All
lines of labor in the city and district
here paid the total of $4,500,00 in
wages for December.
WE WANT TO HEAR
from you if you have any cans; for
dissatisfaction with our confectionery
service. Point to the candy that at
tracts you. It will surely prove en
tirely satisfactory, no matter which
\ariety or mixture you select Give
us a trial.
CANDY PICTURES BOOKS
PIPES KODAKS
CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCO
STATIONERY
HETTELS
The Home of the Kodak
Broadway Ave.
Phone, Madison 119.
The RAINIER BUFFET
Ashland Block, corner of
Broadway and Railroad Ave.
WINES, LIQUORS,
CIGARS, ETC.
The House of Good Service.
Quality Goods Our Motto.
Ns* •
S'
—Hodge in SfRJkane Spokesman-Review.
Mining Notes
Ihe Mother Lode Mining Company
shipped three cars of ore recently and,
have twelve more loaded at their j
platform at McCarthy awaiting cars |
to move it and will bring in two or |
three a week regularly. They have j
over four hundred tons in bunkers at
the mine and the mine is producing
high grade ore faster than the hunk
ers can handle it and as to the milling
ore, there seems to be no end to it.
The writer visited this mine recently
for the first time, and it looks like an
other Bonanza. They are working on |
the same mountain and the same lead.;
Wm. Longley has taken a contract
to handle the freight of the Dan
creek mining company this spring
and will begin to move the supplies j
from McCarthy late this month.
Preliminary estimates by D. F.1
i
Hewett, of the United States Geologi-I
cal Survey Department of the Inter-J
ior, show that tiie production of.
manganese ore in 1916 was about 27,-:
000 tons, the greatest since 1888 and
4
nearly three times that in 1915, which
was 9,709 tons. The estimate does
not include manganiferous iron ores
t
what contain Jess than 40 per cent of
manganese, but it is very probable
that the production of ores of this
class also was much greater than in
1915. This output has come largely
form seven states, and the order in
production will probably prove to be
as follows: California, Arkansas,
Arizona, Georgia, Virginia, Utah,
Colorado. This order is interesting,
because this is the first year in which
a Western State remote from the
steel-producing centers has contribut
ed the largest amount of manganese
ore. The activity among manganese
mines in California is due largely to
the market for ores provided by the
Xoble Electric Steel Co. at Heroult
The prices paid for manganese ore
adapted to the manufacture of ferro
manganese rose from a maximum of
$22.50 for 50 per cent ore in 1915 to
$22.50 in March, 1916. Ore adapted
to the manufacture of dry batteries,
(containing 80 per cent of manganese f
dioxide and less than 1 per cent of
iron) continues to sell for about $R5
a ton.
MINISTER SAYS
PEOPLE WILL NOT
VOTE “BONE DRY”
I
SPOKANE. — Rev. William* C
Hicks, head of All Saints’ Episcopal
cathedral, in his sermon Sunday night
said he believed that the people of
the state would not vote the state
bone-dry if the question were to be
brought to a vote right now.
A. J. Col low, who was admitted to
the Morningside Sanitarium from
Valdez in November, 1914, was re-J
cently discharged from the institution
and given over into the keeping of
friends who took him to Russia.
|
Long distance teieplione Dootb at
The Branch.
PROFESSIONAL
J. H. ROMIG, M. I).
Office on Broadway
Residence Third Ave.
Phones: Office, Adams 9!J; Residence,
Adams 48.
L. R. C. P. & L. R. C. S. Kdinburgh.
L. F. P. & Glasgow.
J. M. SIOAN, M. 0., C. M.
OVER GATEWAY
Office Hours, I to 3 and 7 to 8 P. M.
Pokmuhi.y or Nome.
DR. 0. J. KEATING
DENTIST
Office over Hours:
Bank of Seward 9 a. m. to 5 p. m.
Phone: Office. Mad. 7G; Res., Mad. r>8
DR. CHARLES DAGGETT
DENTIL OFFICES
Stull Building
Office Phone Residence Phone
Adams 111 Mudison 44
LEON C. BOOKER
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Bank of Seward Building
Phone Madison S4
ROBERT SIMPSON
Juneau, Ala>ka
Glasses Fitted Lenses Ground
Special Reduced
Prices on all
Goods
GEORGE
ajfffiLt#
St WARD. ALASKA
Women of Seward
Attention is directed to our
present showing of
NEW WAISTS
in the various favored baterials
for early Spring wear. Also an
exhibit of Novelty Sweaters,
Caps and Scarfs.
ItALLETT & SCOTT
PLACE
your orders with us and play
safe. Don’t experiment.
Printing, Paper Ruling, Loose
Leaf and Blank Book Making—
under one roof, one manage
ment, one responsibility.
TRICK & MURRAY
Printers and Stationers
83 Columbia St. Seattle
ALASKA COMPANY *spftO
SEATTLE SAILINGS
NORTHWESTERN sails Feb. 11
“ MARIPOSA will sail Feb. 8.
Seattle Sailing of 8th, connects with Dora to West
ward.
Right reserved to change this schedule without
notice.
F. B. TRACY, A. H. McDONALD,
General Agent. Agent.
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY
ADMIRAL LINE
Sailings from Seattle to Seward and way ports 10th, ‘20th and
30th of each month. i
Admiral Evans, January 24; Admiral Watson, February 3; Ad
miral Evans, February 15.
Sailings from Seattle to California, Mondays, Fridays and Sat
urdays—Steamers President, Governor, Queen, Admiral Schley, Ad
miral Dewey.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ROUTE—San Francisco to Los Angeles daily ex
cept Sunday. San Franciaco to San Diego, Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Steamers Harvard, Yale, President, Governor, Admiral Schley, Admiral Dewey.
For full particulars address,
WAYNE BLUE, Agent, Seward, Alaska.

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