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The Seward gateway and the Alaska evening post. [volume] (Seward, Alaska) 1917-1918, February 05, 1917, Image 2

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Slip §Piuari (Satproay
and THE ALASKA EVENING POST
Published Daily Except Sunday by The Gateway Publishing Company.
R. G. CHAMBERS, Business Manager. E. O. SAWYER, Jr., Editor.
Published Daily Except on Sundays and Holidays.
Entered as second-class matter September 2, 191F at the postof/ice at
Seward. Alaska, under the act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance.*-.$10.00
Per month, delivered..—.-... 1 ^
Ihe Alaska Weekly Post, by mail...-. 3,00
--- -—
I’KEMEM I VTED
Indications are that another week
or even less may bring us into war
with Germany.
Their rulers have weighed the cost
and figured that war by which they
would be able to sink as many of the
ships enroute to England with food,
and destroy as many munition factor
ies as possible is preferable to peace.
Efforts to get us involved with
Mexico, so that our munition factories
would have to stop making ammuni
tion to sell to the allies and make it
for ourselves, failed.
Germany knows that pressed to the
limit the United States will light
quicker to protect her rights at sea
than for r.ny other cause. For this
reason the Eagle screamed at Tripoli,
when we were a mere baby among
nations, and taught that bunch of
Mediterranian pirates where to head
in. Then we fought a second war with
England and raised a row with
France, although the French hail been
of material aid in beating otT the
British, all because they wouldn’t
leave our ships alone. And after the
Civil war we made England pay an
indemnity of $13,000,000 for helping
the Confederates ruin American com-'
merce with their privateers.
Germany cannot buy from us and
get it delivered, so with continued
peace all the advantages lay with the
allies. If she could by “ruthless sub
marine war” cut otF England she has
a chance to force favorable terms of
peace.
It’s a war to the end in Europe and
the German military chiefs being al-i
ready opposed by as many men and
as much ammunition as can be hand
les! along all the fronts have nothing
to fear from more soldiers even if the
United States could send an army
right away. And she probably tigures
that at the end >he could get better
terms of peace with the U. S. in. tor
we are a generous foe.
Hence, “ruthless submarine war
fare.” regardless.
KEEP THE FIRE Bl'KNlMi
Uncle Sam is taking vital interest
these days in the health ot his peo
ple ami under authorization of the U.
S. public health service the following
is published:
Consider the furnace. Theoretically
this is a machine for the enconontleal
production of heat. If the proper
amount of the proper kind of fuel is
properly put into it. if the ashes are
properly cleaned out, if the drat .3 are
pioperly managed, the chances a.e
that it will heat the house properly.
Perhaps the most important thing
next to putting in the fuel is to clean
out the ashes. If these are allowed to
I
accumulate in the ash pit, the grate j
bars mav be burned out.
Food is taken into the human body
for the purpose of producing heat.
The standard of its value is the man
ner of heat units it contains. If too
little fuel is taken into the . human j
body an insufficient number of heat
units to operate it are received and
it works inefficiently. If, on the other
hand, too great an amount of food is
taken, the hotly becomes clogged and
works just as inefficiently as if it had
received too small an amount. The
most important tiling is to remove
promptly all of the waste materials
remaining after the food hits given up]
its heat units. The elimination of.
these materials is one of the fune-j
lions of the intestinal canal. One of;
the requisites of good health is an
educated intestinal apparatus.
Man in our present state of civiliza
tion is oblibed to pay particular at
tention to functions which in a state
of nature took care of themselves. A
robust man engaged in active exercise
in the open air may commit deitarv
indiscretions which would be exceed
ingly harmful to a sedentary worker.
Kxercse as a part ol the daily life is,
however, absolutely necessary lor
both. Plain, wholesome food is just
as necessary for the brain worker as
for him who labors with his hands.
Above all, both must keep the human
furnace well shaken down and with
out accumulation of ashes and debris
in order that the fires of life may
burn brightly and steadily.
TOO MI CH LAW
The lieutenant governor of Penn
sylvania has been looking into the
legislative product of the various
states and of congress for the past
five years and finds that more than
60.000 laws have been enacted in that
period, by their very bulk a menace
tv> the business of the nation and the
welfare and peace of mind of its peo
ple. The United States and the vari
ous states are now so overburdened
with law, and much of it useless law,
that it amounts to a national handicap
Not only is the business of the
country bound with useless chains,
but it is bi-annually threatened
with a new stock of fetters, imposing
a constant sense of insecurity and
business incertitude.
Legislators now attending to their
duties can render no greater service
to their constituencies than by holding
down new laws to actual necessities.
Much revolutionary legislation was
enacted in the various states two
>curs ago. Some of the radical
changed in policies have not yet been
ruliy tried out. The past two years
nave been years of readjustment and
of experiment with the conditions ot
new legislation, and we are now not
Of Importance
to Men
We want you to know that our whole attention
is given to selecting merchandise of higher quality
that our many customers may he sure of complete
satisfaction when dealing with us.
EVERYTHING you will need in the clothing
line can be found in the complete stock we ha'e
selected for you and
THE PRICES ARE RIGHT—WHY GO
ELSEWHERE.
The Nliners' Store
Frank J. Cotter
HOTEL. SEWARD
FORTY ROOMS-OUT OF FIRE ZONE
J. 0. PATTON, Prop. Rates by Day or Month
Modern Conveniences Well Lighted and Heated J
-\ -ft Bjm
far enough along in many of our ex
periments to determine as yet what
further changes should be made.
In many states legislators are al
ready hoppering in hundreds of bills
for new laws, designed to change,
amend or repeal existing law that is
still in the experimental stage. The!
need for a little breathing time seems j
indicated with an opportunity for the j
people to catch up with legislation
and ascertain their needs more ac
curately.
Legislators, and especially young
legislators, should rid themselves of
the impression that they must fasten j
some new law upon the people to fully
serve them. Very often the ill a leg
islator does in this respect lives long
after him.
We suggest, without intention to1
disparage, that members of the legis- ’
latures of the various states who use
ordinary common sense in their work,
such intelligence as they may have,
to study the state’s needs, and *uch j
judgment as may be utilized in voting
intelligently, will have earned the!
public gratit tde, even if they add no,
new law to the huge bulk tnat now
retards the activities of the people of
the states.—(Seattle P. I.)
■ —■ ■ — ■ ■ 1 ■ ^ ■ —
WHAT ONE CENT WILL DO
According to figures compiled by |
engineers of the General Klectnc
Company one cent’s worth of electric
ity at the usual heating rate oi hree
cents per kilowatt-hour will derate:
A radiant toaster long enough to
make live slices of toast every morn
ing for a week.
An electric curling iron twice a
day for a month.
A radiant grill stove for half an
hour.
A four-inch disk stove for an hour.
An electric griddle for half an
hour.
A heating pad all night or twelve
hours.
A foot wanner for an hour and a
half.
A chafing dish 50 minutes.
Bring three quarts of water to boil
on a water heater.
An electric broiler half an hour.
An electric percolater long enough
to make three cups of coffee every
morning for three mornings.
An electric llatiron long enough to
press three suits.
Dave Terwilliger, old (rail blazer
and former internal revenue collector
in the days before there was trail
to Fairbanks, arrived on the Admiral
Evans.
Anderson & Nelson
THE
TERMINAL
RAINIER BEER
BEST BRANDS OE CIGARS
Try Us Once, then You be the Judge
THE RAINIER BUFFET
Ashland Block, corner of
Broadway and Railroad Ave.
WINES, LIQUORS,
CIGARS, ETC.
The House of Good Service.
Quality Goods Our Motto.
Broadway Cafe
W. H. LINDIO
A PLACE TO EAT
QUALITY, QUANTITY
S K K VIC K, CLK AN LI N KSS
Booths for ladies and party
rooms
Open Day and Night
SHOES ARE GOING IP!
COME BUY YOUR’S NOW
BEFORE THEY REACH
THE SKY
^mm
TWO NEW SHIPMENTS JUST
-IN-===
ELLSWORTH’S
SEWARD BAKERY
Phone Madison 82
Excells in Good Bakery Goods
Give Them a Trial
REP. HEID IS
DEAD, CAME TO
ALASKA IN '85

Counsel in Forestry Fund
Cases and Old Timer
Dies at Frisco
JUNEAU. — (Special) — Attorney
John (i. Heid, republican representa
tive elect, died on the morning of
January 25th at San Francisco after
a short illness. He was one of the
old residents of Juneau, coming north
in 1885.
During the past thirty odd years,!
in addition to the duties devolving up-1
on him as a lawyer he was engaged
in sundry mining enterprises.
Heid was national committeeman of
the Republican party, from Alaska,,
for eight years and was a delegate I
to the Philadelphia convention in 1900
when McKinley was nominated fori
president, for his second term. He;
also attended the Republican Nation-!
al Convention in Chicago in 1904
when Theodore Roosevelt was nomi
* i
nated for the presidency.
_ »
John G. Held was married to Missw
Henrietta Jensen, who had been a1
government teacher in Juneau, ini
July, 1888. Besides the widow there,
survive three grown daughters, Mrs.
V. NT. Dupuy, and Misses Gertrude ]
and Elizabeth all of whom now reside j
in the city.
At the time of his death he was in
San Francisco to argue on behalf of
the members of the Territorial legis-1
laturc of Alaska the case involving]
the distribution of the forest funds.
He left Juneau for this purpose early
this month with the intention of re
turning to Alaska about two weeks
before the next legislature meets to
which he had been elected a member
of the lower house from the First di
vision, by the largest plurality re
ceived by any candidate. He also
served as a member ol the previous
legislature.
Cheer Up Folks
THERE’3 MORE IN THE KITCHEN
Perhaps the Boy Was Bight
The teacher was trying to make his
pupils understand that all good comes
from one source. As an illustration
he told them of building a house and
putting water pipes with faucets in
all the rooms, these pipes not being
connected with the main in the street.
“Suppose I turn on a faucet and no
water comes, what is the matter ?”
He naturally supposed that some of
the boys would answer that the wat
er was not turned on at the main, but
they didn't. On the contrary, one boy
at the foot of the class called out:
“You didn't pay your water bill
A Pair of Shears
Customer (to clerk in hardware
store)—Show me a small, low-priced
shears.
Clerk (facetiously)—Perhaps you
mean a pair of shears.
Customer (severely)—I mean pre
cisely what I said.
Clerk (definitely, opening a speci- i
men article)—Are there not two j
blades here? And don’t two make aj
pair ?
Customer (triumphantly) — You
have two legs; does that make you a
pair of men.
The shears were done up in pro-j
found silence.
Yes, There Was Quarreling
Among the applicants for employ
ment in the service of a Jersey house
hold there once came a big, husky
Irish girl named Rosalie.
“What was your reason for leaving
your last place, Rosalie? asked the
mistress during the course of exami
nation.
“I couldn't stand the way the mast
er and mistress used to quarrel,
mum," was the reply of Rosalie.
“Dear, dear!" exclaimed the lady,
“Did they quarrel all the time?"
‘‘AH the time, mum," repeated Ro
salie, “and, mum, whin it wasn't me
and him, it was me and her."
Dr. and Mrs. Stanley of Knik and
S. L. Stanley who arrived on the Al
aska, left with A1 Chamberlain for
Anchorage at an early hour this
morning.
Catholic Church
Sundays—Communion Mass at 8:30,
Mass and sermon at 10:30 a. m. Sun
day school after mass. Rosary, in
struction and benediction at 7:30 p.
m. Week days—Daily mass at 7:30.
ALASKA COMPANY * $fftD
SEATTLE SAILINGS
NORTHWESTERN sails Feb. 11
MARIPOSA will sail Feb. 8.
Seattle Sailing of 8th, connects with Dora to West
ward.
Right reserved to change this schedule without
notice.
F. B. TRACY, A. H. McDONALD,
General Agent. Agent.
PACIFIC STEAMSHIPCOMPANY
ADMIRAL LINE
Sailings from Seattle to Seward and way ports 10th, 20th and
30th of each month.
Admiral Kvans, January 24; Admiral Watson, February 3; Ad
miral Kvans, February 15.
Sailings from Seattle to California, Mondays, Fridays and Sat
urdays—Steamers President, Governor, Queen, Admiral Schley, Ad
miral Dewey.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ROUTE Sun Francisco to 1/jh Angeles dully »*\
rept Sunday. San Francisco to San Diego. Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Steamers Harvard, Yale, President, Governor. Admiral Schley, Admiral Dewey.
For full particular# address.
WAYNE BLUE, Apent, Seward, Alaska.
HOTEL OVERLANI
E. L. WHITTEMORE, Proprietor
Headquarters for Minins Men
SEWARD, - - - ALASKA
For the benefit of those Interested in Alaska in
General and Seward in Particular an
INFORMATION BUREAU
has been established in connection with this paper, and all tho>e desir
ing information as to the value of real esiate and business opportuni
ties are requested to address their communications to
INFORMATION DEPARTMENT, SEWARD
GATEWAY.
Seward, Alaska.
The Seward News Company
GEORGE PHELPS
Iiooksellers, Newsdealers and Stationers
Charles Crawford
General Blacksmith
Horseshoeing
Wheehvrighting
Corner Sixth Avenue and
Railway Avenue
SEWARI), ALASKA
I
_ -
Seward Saw Mill Co
A. F. RASMUSSEN, Prop.
Good Rough Lumber of all
kinds $26.00 and up per
thousand, delivered.
Telephone Kenai 2
The Garstens Packing Go,
Wholesale and Retail
Beef, Pork, Veal, Mutton, Poultry,
Lard, Hams and Bacon.
Butter and Eggs
Orders from the Westward and Cook
Inlet Given Careful Attention.
BROADWAY AVE. SEWARD
PIONEER
HOTEL
F. B. CANNON, Prop.
Headquarters for the
Prospector, Miner and
Farmer
KNIK ... ALASKA
For a Good Haircut go to
JUNTE
Broadway Near Adams
JUST TO REMIND YOU
-of
Union Pacific System
Through Cars
between SEATTLEand Chicago
Kansas City, Denver
San Francisco, Los Angeles
Direct Connections for all
points East via theFamous
COLUMBIA RIVER ROUTE.
Trains protected all the way
—all the time—by Automatic
Electric “Safety" Signals. ^
H. L. HUDSON. A. G. F. & P. A.
SEATTLE
Women of Seward
Attention is directed to our
present showing of
NEW WAISTS
in the various favored baterials
for early Spring wear. Also an
exhibit of Novelty Sweaters^
Caps and Scarfs.
HALLER & SCOTT
JOE RENO
MILE 75 ROADHOUSE
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
GIRDWOOD
%*
Everything for Dog Muehers
and Travelers
Best Roadhouse on the Line
ALASKANS
may rest assured of perfect
work and service when orders
for Blank Books, Loose Leaf
work, etc., are sent to US! We
not only AIM to catch the first
boat but we DO it.
TRICK & MURRAY
Stationers and Printers
85 Columbia St.—Seattle.

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