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The Seward gateway and the Alaska evening post. [volume] (Seward, Alaska) 1917-1918, February 09, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87062015/1917-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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rr 7177 n I gold, coal
_ - X r-. Ni II I COPPER
OF THE LAST M jO | AND FISH
FRONTIER
and Alaskia Evening Post_
\ olume XI. Number 72 = SEWARD, ALASKA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1917 _ Ten Cents the Copy
ORDER MILLION FEET OF I
TIMBER FOR SEWARD END
OF THE U. S. RAILROAD
SEATTLE. Friday, Feb. 9.—An order for 1.
000,000 feet of bridge timber for use in repairing
and replacing the bridges on the Seward division
of the government railroad is being placed here
today by Purchasing Agent Dole lor the Alaskan
Engineering Commission.
This lumber is for early delivery, and it is
probable that the cargo carrier which takes it
north will also take the fifty ton locomotive pur
chased for the Seward division, as part of the
consignment.
Dole also opened bids today for 74 convert
ible ballast cars, for use on the U. S. railroad.
Rails ordered are already here.
RUSH ORDER FOR 52
ARTILLERY IATTERIES;
NAVY WANTS 25,000
WASHINGTON. Friday. Feb. 9—Sec. of War Baker
sent direct orders to the Bethlehem steel plant today, to;
cease work on minor orders for the war department and
concentrate all available men immediately on the produc-j
tion of 39 batteries of four-inch and 13 batteries of six
inch guns for the United States held artillery.
These guns will be built from designs completed as
the result of obse.\ ...:ons by military officials in Europe
during the present war.
The Bethlehem plant will also commence work at
once on a 9.2 inch field howitzer for the United States!
which it is declared will be a far more excellent weapon of
destruction than the 42 centimeter howitzers on which
Germany pinned many hopes at the opening of ihe present
conflict.
The total order is for nearly 400 pieces of artillery.
WANT 25,000 MEN IN NAVY
WASHINGTON, Friday, Feb.,9. — Navy recruiting;
agents have been instructed to immediately enlist 25,000
additional men in the U. S. navy, and urgent appeals for |
enlistments accompany the order.
DISMISS TEUTONS FROM CUTTERS !
WASHINGTON, Friday, Feb. 9.—An order was is
sued today for the dismissal from the coast guard service|
all enlisted men who are Germans.
_
WILSON WILL NOT ASK FOR WAR
WASHINGTON, Friday, Feb. 9.—President Wilson
today framed a definite course to be pursued in case Ger-,
many commits an “overt act” as mentioned in his address J
to congress. .He will not ask congress for a declaration of j
war but will do just what he promised, in the address and
“ask that he be allowed to use whatever measures he
deems neeessarv to protect American seamen and trav
elers.”
GERMANS TOLD NOT TO FEAR
WASHINGTON, Friday, Feb. 9.—Sec. Lansing said
today, “I am very loath to believe that the German gov
ernment intentionally is detaining Ambassador Gerard in |
Berlin for any excuse whatsoever.
Because of concern in some quarters over the safety
of money and property of German subjects in this country
the President gave his personal word today that such
fears are entirely unfounded. The state depart nine l al
"so issued a reassuring statement when it reported that
quantities of money sad been consigned to South Ameri
can ports by Germans living here.
BRAZIL TO HOLD GERMANY RESPONSIBLE
RIO DK JANERIO. Friday. Feb. 9.—Brazil’s reply to
the German submarine warfare note is a polite but firm
declaration of Brazil’s determination to hold Germany
responsible for consequences which may arise or result
from “unrestricted warfare."
NEW YORK, Friday, Feb. 9—Scandinavian line of
ficials declared today that they would not allow the liner
Frederick the 8th to sail with Bernstorff unless
Germany as well as England and France guarantees the
safety of both passengers and ship.
PROGRESS LOST
HER MAST AND
DORIES IN BLOW
Power Schooner Now on
Way to Seattle
For Repairs
KETCHIKAN, Friday, Feb. 9.—
Capt. Solness of the schooner Zapora
arriving here yesterday, from Seattle,
reported having met the power
schooner Progress in Milbank sound.
The Progress had lost her main
mast and some of her dories, but all
on her were safe. She was enroutt
to Seattle for repairs.
The Progress had not been seen
from the time she lost her tow, the
Harold Blekum, now reported safe at
Seward, off Cape Ommaney on Jan.
31.
TEN STEAMERS ON
ADMIRAL LINE’S
ALASKA RUN, 1917
SEATTLE, Friday, Feb. !>. — The
Pacific Steamship company will oper
ate ten vessels on the Alaska run this
season, according to an announcement
posted here today.
HOOTCH SLEDS
MAKE TRAIN’S
TRAIL SLOW
■ ^ * •
Since the order went into effect on
the government railroad, preventing
the shipment of any liquor consign
ments to the interior, sled travel De
tween here and Mile 40 has increas
ed to a remarkable degree.
So many sleds came and went be
tween trains during the thaw of two
days ago that the dogs and sled run
ners pushed snow on the rails which
froze over night making hard going
for the train next day.
EXPECT WORD
FROM RELATIVES OF
JOHN HENDRICKS
Commissioner Ennis has received
word that a letter is on its way from
the relatives of John Hendricks, who
was killed by Watler Stoker, near
Mile 12.
Hendricks had a large amount of
money on his person when killed, and
for a time it looked like this would
have to be turned ovqr to the terri
tory, because no one knew where his
relatives lived. Then Ennis heard of
a man living in Ballard, Wash., who
was an old acquaintance of Hend
ricks and a letter to this man brought
results.
MERCHANT SHIPS
MAY REPORT AT
I SEA IF DESIRED
SEATTLE, Friday, Feb. 9. — The
| navy department order respecting
wireless reports has been modified so
as to permit merchant steamers to re
port their positions if they desire to
do so.
CHURCHES UNITE !
! FOR PATRIOTIC j
TRIBUTE SUNDAY
Churches to Hold Union
Meeting on Birthday
of Lincoln
The pastors and congregation of
the Methodist and Community
Christian churches will unite in a
special patriotic service on next Sun
day evening, Feb. 11, the eve of Lin
coln’s birthday.
The service will be held in the
Community church at 7:d0. The ad
dress of the evening on the subject
“God's Providence in American His
tory,” will be delivered by Rev. J. J.
Patton of the Methodist church.
There will be special music and other
extra features which will make this
one of the very best religious services
of the year in Seward .
The young peoples’ meeting at 6:30
which will be ably led by Mr. Morford
will also be held in the Community
church. Surely no patriotic citizen
of Seward can spend next Sunday
evening more profitably than at $uct'.
a service. Everyone will be cordial!*/
welcomed.
OOLIKAN IN
STREAMS, SO
ALL’S WELL
No danger of anyone going hungry
for the next few weeks, regardless of
war, the high cost of living or weath
er—
The oolikan are running.
No, an oolikan is not a breed or
racing dog, it’s a fish. (This for the
benefit of the cheechakos.)
Good catches of the succulent
candle fish or “hooligan,” as this mem
ber of the smelt family is more com
monly known, are being made every
day, and if you have not had a mess
why not take a keg hoop and a
little mosquito netting and go after
some up at the head of the bay. >
INFORMATION ON
SHIPMENTS NOW _;
BEING WITHHELD
Uncle Sam’s law enacted after the
bomb plots aimed at shipments for
the allies, which prohibits anyone
from giving out or securing informa
tion concerning shipments handled by
any common carrier is being more
rigidly enforced.
Notices have been received by all
representatives of the steamship,
companies that no information must
be given out concerning shipments
which might in any way be a detri
ment to the shipper or consignee.
I OLD TIMER KILLED
I NEAR FAIRBANKS
_
FAIRBANKS, Friday, Feb. 9.—
(Special)—Joe Hanbury, an old timer
was killed in a logging camp near
here yesterday by a falling tree.
AT RATE DURING THREE
DAYS /ERY BOAT WILL
VANISH IN FOUR YEARS
%
WASHINGTON, Friday, Feb. 9. — Germany’s sub
marine campaign may actually bring England to her
knees, if it continues to be as successful as from Feb. oth
to 7th. This is shown in a graphic manner today in the
report by Lloyds that if the destruction of merchant ships
continues at the present rate it would clear the seas of
every vessel afloat in four years.
During the fifth, sixth and seventh days of the cam
paign the ships destroyed included a tonnage of 85,000.
#
“ADEQUATELY ARMED” SHIPS GET BY
MONTREAL, Friday, Feb. 9.—“Out of 78 adequately
armed vessels which passed through the submarine zone
up to Wednesday night, the German submarines were
only able to sink six,” was the reply of Wra. Hodge, mini
ster of labor when asked in the British parliament today
if the sub blockade would isolate England.
This information was received in a special dispatch
by the Montreal Star.
ORDER BRITISH SHIPS BUILT IN U. S.
SAN FRANCISCO, Friday, Feb. 9.—British firms or
dered three 10,000 ton freighters here today from local
ship builders.
This is the first time in 50 years that Great Britain
has sent orders abroad for ships.
LINER RYNDAM WARNED
TO “GO BACK” BY SUB
NEW YORK, F riday, Feb. 9.—Warned to turn back,
under penalty of destruction, the Holland-American liner,
Ryndam, is returnig to New York today after encounter
ing a German submarine on the border of the forbidden
zone of “unrestricted” warfare.
The Ryndam sailed from this port on Jan. 29th, with
the American consular agent at Luxemburg, and nearly
110 cabin passengers aboard.
Information of what happened was received in a
radio message sent to relatives here by a passenger.
There was considerable rejoicing in the local offices
that the submarine commander went out of his way to
give those on board a chance instead of allowing the ves
sel to steam on into waters, in which it would have been
his duty to sink her without warning.
25 MERCHANTMEN SAlF
UN 1 CONVOY OF FLEET
NORFOLK, Va., Friday, Feb. 9.—Loaded with war
munitions, cotton and general supplies for the Allies a
great fleet of, 25 freight steamers and sailing vessels fly
ing British, French and Italian flags left‘Virginia ports
today, and will be convoyed to Europe.
Twenty-five miles off shore a fleet of allied cruisers
awaited the sailing and will travel with the freighters to
prevent raids from the German submarines.
It is understood that the sailing ships will be towed
to keep them with the rest of the convoy.
A newspaper tug or two accompanied the fleet a
short distance and report that it appeared a veritable
armada.
■ ■ — |
SEEK “SAFE” TRIf ON CONVOYED BOATS
NEW YORK, Friday, Feb. 9.—A number of persons
who had engaged passage to Europe on American line
ships and other neutral vessels not armed cancelled their
reservations today and booked on ships flying the flags of
the belligerents. Some took passage on the French liner
! Espagne which sails Sunday.
They gave as their reason for this move that the un
I armed and unconvoyed boats were in far greater danger
of being sunk than the ships of France and Germanv, now
that the latter are being convoyed by armed squadrons.

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